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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

Street Fighter X Tennis: Facepunch Reveal Deuce:

The revelation that Facepunch Studios were not working exclusively on Rust, but daring to prototype new games like Riftlight too (spoiler: this happens literally everywhere), sent some people on the Internet into a bit of a tizzy. “They are probably going to be even angrier to find out that we have three other prototypes being worked […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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The Devaluing of Game Design and the Market Impact - by Ulyana Chernyak:

The video game market has been steadily declining over the last few years which may be good for consumers, but paints a serious problem for game developers. Today’s post examines why this is happening and why it is a problem. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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The Most Dangerous Word In Software Development:

“Just put it up on a server somewhere.”

“Just add a favorite button to the right side of the item.”

“Just add [insert complex option here] to the settings screen.”

Usage of the word “just” points to a lot of assumptions being made. A few months ago, Brad Frost shared some thoughts on how the word applies to knowledge.

“Just” makes me feel like an idiot. “Just” presumes I come from a specific background, studied certain courses in university, am fluent in certain technologies, and have read all the right books, articles, and resources.

He points out that learning is never as easy as it is made to seem, and he’s right. But there is a direct correlation between the amount of knowledge you’ve acquired and the danger of the word “just.” The more you know, the bigger the problems you solve, and the bigger the assumptions are that are hiding behind the word.

Take the comment, “Just put it up on a server somewhere.” How many times have we heard that? But taking a side project running locally and deploying it on real servers requires time, money, and hard work. Some tiny piece of software somewhere will probably be the wrong version, and will need to be addressed. The system built locally probably isn’t built to scale perfectly.

“Just” implies that all of the thinking behind a feature or system has been done. Even worse, it implies that all of the decisions that will have to be made in the course of development have already been discovered—and that’s never the case.

Things change when something moves from concept to reality. As Dave Wiskus said on a recent episode of Debug, “everything changes when fingers hit glass.”

The favorite button may look fine on the right side, visually, but it might be in a really tough spot to touch. What about when favoriting isn’t the only action to be taken? What happens to the favorite button then?

Even once favoriting is built and in testing, it should be put through its paces again. In use, does favoriting provide enough value to warrant is existence? After all, “once that feature’s out there, you’re stuck with it.”

When you hear the word “just” being thrown around, dig deep into that statement and find all of the assumptions made within it. Zoom out and think slow.

Your product lives and dies by the decisions discovered between ideation and creation, so don’t just put it up on a server somewhere.

via A List Apart: The Full Feed

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Getting Back To Coding: New submitter rrconan writes I always feel like I’m getting old because of the constant need to learn a new tools to do the same job. At the end of projects, I get the impression that nothing changes — there are no real benefits to the new tools, and the only result is a lot of time wasted learning them instead of doing the work. We discussed this last week with Andrew Binstock’s “Just Let Me Code” article, and now he’s written a follow-up about reducing tool complexity and focusing on writing code. He says, “Tool vendors have several misperceptions that stand in the way. The first is a long-standing issue, which is ‘featuritis’: the tendency to create the perception of greater value in upgrades by adding rarely needed features. … The second misperception is that many tool vendors view the user experience they offer as already pretty darn good. Compared with tools we had 10 years ago or more, UIs have indeed improved significantly. But they have not improved as fast as complexity has increased. And in that gap lies the problem.’ Now I understand that what I thought of as “getting old” was really “getting smart.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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One cop in Seattle issues 80% of city's marijuana tickets:

An internal investigation revealed that the officer “flipped a coin when contemplating which subject to cite,” and that he called Washington’s legal marijuana law “silly.”
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Updated Qi 1.2 standard makes wireless charging more wireless:

Phones and chargers will no longer need to come into direct contact. via Ars Technica

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Art movements in video games, Justwalkingism - by Oscar Barda:

We established previously that games are an artistic field in which art pieces can exist, let’s now look at the first art movement in this article series : justwalkingism. What is it, how and where does it exist, what games were birthed from it? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Big Data, Big Problems: A Mathematician’s Take on the Current State of Game Analytics - by Tom Matcham:

After performing an extensive analysis of the games industry’s use of data science, mathematician and middleware developer Tom Matcham gives some insight into what studios can do to improve their game analytics. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Game Screenshots that sell on the Apple App Store - by Alexandru Bleau:

An overview of what to pay attention to when making screenshots for the App Store so they help sell the game. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Min/Max Mastery in Game Design - by Josh Bycer:

Min/Max is a popular term for hardcore gamers and represents playing a game in the most optimal fashion. For today’s post, we’re going to examine this phenomenon and what it means for game designers. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Where literature and gaming collide:

Game narratives tend to drink from a narrow pond; they swig space operas and Tolkien, swish them about their mouths and trickle them into rows of polished glasses.

There’s nothing wrong with science fiction and fantasy, just as there’s nothing wrong with escapism. But there is something wrong with lazy writing, with cynical pandering to an assumed audience. It’s a good thing then that games are deepening, diversifying; that there are now game developers who draw on increasingly complex sources to inform and shape the works they make. Literary fiction has seen a growing presence in game design. While story often exists in order to thread together puzzles or rooms of enemies, some games are letting their writing spill out of pure functionality, instead taking inspiration from works which do more than push an easy plot. Take Kentucky Route Zero, whose creators - Jake Elliot and Tamas Kemenczy of Cardboard Computer - point to literature and theatre as sources of inspiration.

"Some of our first points of reference when sketching and imagining Kentucky Route Zero were in fiction - the magical realism of Gabriel Garcia Márquez and the southern gothic of Flannery O’Connor," say Elliot and Kemenczy. "We also looked early on at theatre scripts. That ended up being extremely important to us, in characterisation and dialogue and also the environment design and treatment of space, lighting and movement."

Read more…

via Eurogamer.net

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Leaderboards - the original and best social feature ... - by John Griffin:

Leaderboards are an incredibly effective social feature that can be easily added to a game. They are primarily used to increase a games retention and engagement but can also be used to drive up player acquisition. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Morgan Freeman narrates a Juggalo documentary [NSFW]:

Here’s what happens when you add Morgan Freeman’s narration for March of the Penguins to American Juggalo. via Boing Boing

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What's original? Cloning games versus making games:


Raph “Theory of Fun" Koster has a wonderful, readable, theory-rich article that helps unpick the discussion about when a game is a clone of another game, when it’s a skin, when it’s a variant, and when it’s a new game.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Great video explainer: Vint Cerf on ICANN and NTIA:

The “father of the Internet” explains why the Congressional posturing and global freakout about the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration stepping back from management of the Internet domain name system is misplaced.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Platforming brawlers vs Anxiety? - by Eske Knudsen:

Could you successfully improve people’s ability to focus and concentrate by playing challenging side-scrolling platform brawlers? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Toto Temple Deluxe: Sacrificing Fun To Remove The No-Fun - by Yowan Langlais:

Making a game is rarely a straightforward process, and if so odds are the maker did not care enough. Game design is much like an ecosystem; we can see the birth and death of many ideas through the evolution of the design. Here are examples. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Senator John Walsh plagiarism, color-coded:

John Walsh plagiarism

John Walsh, the U.S. Senator from Montana, is in the news lately for plagiarizing a large portion of his final … via FlowingData

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Hokuto Musuo (Sale) > PS3:
Hokuto Musuo (Sale)

Title : Hokuto Musuo (Sale)
Publisher : Koei
Game Type : Action
Console : PS3

Price : £9.99

Immortalised by the line ‘You are already dead’ and Kenshiro’s lightning fast attacks, the post-apocalyptic world of North Star was one of the first animes released in the West. Think of a cartoon Mad Max where you meet adversaries and more often than not, their heads explode. Koei gets nasty and heads roll with their multi character mechanics working a treat in a top, top license.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Heavy Metal Thunder > PS2:
Heavy Metal Thunder

Title : Heavy Metal Thunder
Publisher : Square Enix
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : PS2

Price : £6.99

3D fighting game set to a heavy metal soundtrack as you may well have guessed. The metal overtones don’t stop there though with an o.t.t. announcer and in your face visuals. Combat takes place through selecting a move, often resulting in a clashing together of the two pugilists. When this happens two electric guitars appear for a frantic bit of strumming to be the first to build up the power meter to max. That’s when it all starts getting a bit weird as truly immense specials kick quite literally in. Be it to the backdrop of white cranes and an ancient temple or a Hokusai style sea painting, the opponent really cops it bad - no more so than being turned into a motorbike and ridden down the motorway to the pounding soundtrack. Visually splendid in fitting with the full on gameplay.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Radirgy Precious (New) > PS2:
Radirgy Precious (New)

Title : Radirgy Precious (New)
Publisher : Milestone
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PS2

Price : £22.99

Milestone covert the Dreamcast blast to the PS2 with a new special mode exclusive to the format with more bullets, less continues and a different way to rack up the multiplier for a top ranking score. Cel shaded sprites are not too everyone’s tastes, but given the chance this should satisfy the most demanding of shmup aficionados. The mobile phone reception multiplier adds that extra element to appease the hardcore shmup vet too. Sometimes spelt Radilgy.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Kingdom Hearts II (Best) (New) > PS2:
Kingdom Hearts II (Best) (New)

Title : Kingdom Hearts II (Best) (New)
Publisher : Square Enix
Game Type : RPG
Console : PS2

Price : £11.99

A smashing series that shows that big budget collaborations can bare succulently sweet fruit when in the right hands with a dream collaboration between Square Enix and Disney. Succinct gameplay and scintillating visuals with delicately balanced mechanics.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Five nightmares of a modern Game Designer - by Svyatoslav Torick:

The Game Designer is the only person who is utterly and completely in charge of the game experience, so to make the impressions seamless and thorough they have to meet compromises and make sacrifices. Here are five basic working issues we experience. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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The "Just In Time" Theory of User Behavior:

I’ve long believed that the design of your software has a profound impact on how users behave within your software. But there are two sides to this story:

  • Encouraging the “right” things by making those things intentionally easy to do.

  • Discouraging the “wrong” things by making those things intentionally difficult, complex, and awkward to do.

Whether the software is doing this intentionally, or completely accidentally, it’s a fact of life: the path of least resistance is everyone’s best friend. Learn to master this path, or others will master it for you.

For proof, consider Dan Ariely’s new and amazing book, The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone – Especially Ourselves.

Indeed, let’s be honest: we all lie, all the time. Not because we’re bad people, mind you, but because we have to regularly lie to ourselves as a survival mechanism. You think we should be completely honest all the time? Yeah. Good luck with that.

But these healthy little white lies we learn to tell ourselves have a darker side. Have you ever heard this old adage?

One day, Peter locked himself out of his house. After a spell, the locksmith pulled up in his truck and picked the lock in about a minute.

“I was amazed at how quickly and easily this guy was able to open the door,” Peter said. The locksmith told him that locks are on doors only to keep honest people honest. One percent of people will always be honest and never steal. Another 1% will always be dishonest and always try to pick your lock and steal your television; locks won’t do much to protect you from the hardened thieves, who can get into your house if they really want to.

The purpose of locks, the locksmith said, is to protect you from the 98% of mostly honest people who might be tempted to try your door if it had no lock.

I had heard this expressed less optimistically before as

10% of people will never steal, 10% of people will always steal, and for everyone else … it depends.

The “it depends” part is crucial to understanding human nature, and that’s what Ariely spends most of the book examining in various tests. If for most people, honesty depends, what exactly does it depend on? The experiments Ariely conducts prove again and again that most people will consistently and reliably cheat “just a little”, to the extent that they can still consider themselves honest people. The gating factor isn’t laws, penalties, or ethics. Surprisingly, that stuff has virtually no effect on behavior. What does, though, is whether they can personally still feel like they are honest people.

This is because they don’t even consider it cheating – they’re just taking a little extra, giving themselves a tiny break, enjoying a minor boost, because well, haven’t they been working extra specially hard lately and earned it? Don’t they of all people deserve something nice once in a while, and who would even miss this tiny amount? There’s so much!

These little white lies are the path of least resistance. They are everywhere. If laws don’t work, if ethics classes don’t work, if severe penalties don’t work, how do you encourage people to behave in a way that “feels” honest that is actually, you know, honest? Feelings are some pretty squishy stuff.

It’s easier than you think.

My colleagues and I ran an experiment at the University of California, Los Angeles. We took a group of 450 participants, split them into two groups and set them loose on our usual matrix task. We asked half of them to recall the Ten Commandments and the other half to recall 10 books that they had read in high school.

Among the group who recalled the 10 books, we saw the typical widespread but moderate cheating. But in the group that was asked to recall the Ten Commandments, we observed no cheating whatsoever. We reran the experiment, reminding students of their schools’ honor codes instead of the Ten Commandments, and we got the same result. We even reran the experiment on a group of self-declared atheists, asking them to swear on a Bible, and got the same no-cheating results yet again.

That’s the good news: a simple reminder at the time of the temptation is usually all it takes for people to suddenly “remember” their honesty.

The bad news is Clippy was right.

In my experience, nobody reads manuals, nobody reads FAQs, and nobody reads tutorials. I am exaggerating a little here for effect, of course. Some A+ students will go out of their way to read these things. That’s how they became A+ students, by naturally going the extra mile, and generally being the kind of users who teach themselves perfectly well without needing special resources to get there. When I say “nobody” I mean the vast overwhelming massive majority of people you would really, really want to read things like that. People who don’t have the time or inclination to expend any effort at all other than the absolute minimum required, people who are most definitely not going to go the extra mile.

In other words, the whole world.

So how do you help people who, like us, just never seem to have the time to figure this stuff out becase they’re, like, suuuuper busy and stuff?

You do it by showing them …

  • the minumum helpful reminder
  • at exactly the right time

This is what I’ve called the “Just In Time” theory of user behavior for years. Sure, FAQs and tutorials and help centers are great and all, but who has the time for that? We’re all perpetual intermediates here, at best.

The closer you can get your software to practical, useful “Just In Time” reminders, the better you can help the users who are most in need. Not the A+ students who already read the FAQ, and studied the help center intently, but those users who never read anything. And now, thanks to Dan Ariely, I have the science to back this up. Even something as simple as putting your name on the top of a form to report auto insurance milage, rather than the bottom, resulted in a mysterious 10% increase in average miles reported. Having that little reminder right at the start that hey, your name is here on this form, inspired additional honesty. It works.

Did we use this technique on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange? Indeed we did. Do I use this technique on Discourse? You bet, in even more places, because this is social discussion, not technical Q&A. We are rather big on civility, so we like to remind people when they post on Discourse they aren’t talking to a computer or a robot, but a real person, a lot like you.

When’s the natural time to remind someone of this? Not when they sign up, not when they’re reading, but at the very moment they begin typing their first words in their first post. This is the moment of temptation when you might be super mega convinced that someone is Wrong on the Internet. So we put up a gentle little reminder Just In Time, right above where they are typing:

Then hopefully, as Dan Ariely showed us with honesty, this little reminder will tap into people’s natural reserves of friendliness and civility, so cooler heads will prevail – and a few people are inspired to get along a little better than they did yesterday. Just because you’re on the Internet doesn’t mean you need to be yelling at folks 24/7.

We use this same technique a bunch of other places: if you are posting a lot but haven’t set an avatar, if you are adding a new post to a particularly old conversation, if you are replying a bunch of times in the same topic, and so forth. Wherever we feel a gentle nudge might help, at the exact time the behavior is occurring.

It’s important to understand that we use these reminders in Discourse not because we believe people are dumb; quite the contrary, we use them because we believe people are smart, civil, and interesting. Turns out everyone just needs to be reminded of that once in a while for it to continue to be true.

[advertisement] Stack Overflow Careers matches the best developers (you!) with the best employers. You can search our job listings or create a profile and even let employers find you.
via Coding Horror

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Understanding Microtransaction Pricing - by Ulyana Chernyak:

As more developers turn to free to play or monetization for their games, it’s important to understand the thought process that should be going into deciding pricing on this type of content. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Viral Installs - Getting Users to Share and Rate Your Game - by Yaniv Nizan:

Everyone wants more organic installs and the way to get them is to make your game highly shareable. By inspecting games that succeeded in becoming viral and comparing them to other game, the slides in this post offer a recipe for game virality. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Starsector: A Story of Indie Development Done Right - Interview with Alex Mosolov - by Mihai Cosma:

In this article i interview Alex Mosolov, an indie developer and lead of Fractal Softworks, lead dev of one of the most well-designed and properly-managed indie games that you most likely don’t know about, Starsector. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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The Visual Guide to Multiplayer Level Design - by Bobby Ross:

An infographic tutorial series on designing team based, multiplayer, shooter maps. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Gunspike > Dreamcast:
Gunspike

Title : Gunspike
Publisher : Capcom
Game Type : Action
Console : Dreamcast

Price : £34.99

Really wild take on a shoot ‘em up bringing fisticuffs into the mix. A dream combination for fans of Capcom in this productive link up with Psikyo. Known as Cannon Spike in the West.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Psycho Chaser > PCEngineHuCard:
Psycho Chaser

Title : Psycho Chaser
Publisher : Naxat Soft
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PCEngineHuCard

Price : £11.99

Replaces the standard spaceship with an android warrior in this vertically scrolling shooter. Four weapons to choose from that can be rotated mid mission and can also be powered up with energy points. You may get deja vu with the bosses on the last level, but this shooter is made of solid stuff like the androids exoskeleton.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Space Cruiser Yamato > PCEngineSuperCDROM:
Space Cruiser Yamato

Title : Space Cruiser Yamato
Publisher : Human
Game Type : Simulation
Console : PCEngineSuperCDROM

Price : £7.99

Known as ‘Starblazers’ in the West, this space simulation is based on the true classic, which even has its own exhibitions in Japan and its own distinct feel in an over crowded market place. Yamato is a flying naval ship and also the believed to be the essence of the Japanese spirit. The game captures the romantic overtones of the original anime.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Unity Optimizing For Mobile Using SubTile Meshes - by Mark Hogan:

Making your Unity game run smoothly on low end devices can be tricky, particularly if you’re using the indie version. This post shows a way of authoring your 3D to reduce drawcalls while still making use of tiled textures. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Video: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Teaches You How To Write A Screenplay:

  Before I started /Film, I was an aspiring screenwriter (and later an aspiring filmmaker). Screenwriting has always been a love of mine, and I have tremendous respect for writers in this world. I think most people who go to the movies think films are written like novels — How to write a screenplay? A writer […]

The post Video: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Teaches You How To Write A Screenplay appeared first on /Film.

via /Film

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Watch ‘More Than A Game’: A Documentary About ‘Street Fighter’ Gaming Championship:

More Than A Game is a 2011 documentary by Thomas Hewett and Jack Abbot following competitive Street Fighter video gamers who are training and traveling to Las Vegas to compete in the United States Championships. Every year, thousands of players from all over the world will descend upon Las Vegas to find out who is […]

The post Watch ‘More Than A Game’: A Documentary About ‘Street Fighter’ Gaming Championship appeared first on /Film.

via /Film

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New App Doesn't Let You See Your Photos Until 1 Hour Later:

We’ve all done it. Our food arrives, we instantly pull our our smartphone to get the perfect shot and then spend about 10 minutes selecting the perfect Instagram filter and hashtags, completely ignoring the friends we’re with in the meantime. In an attempt to stem this social faux-pax, a new app called 1-Hour Photo lets you take photos as normal, but doesn’t actually let you see them until one hour later, much like the old “1 Hour Photo” film developing services.

Continue Reading… via HUH.

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TED: Joi Ito: Want to innovate? Become a "now-ist" - Joi Ito (2014):

“Remember before the internet?” asks Joi Ito. “Remember when people used to try to predict the future?” In this engaging talk, the head of the MIT Media Lab skips the future predictions and instead shares a new approach to creating in the moment: building quickly and improving constantly, without waiting for permission or for proof that you have the right idea. This kind of bottom-up innovation is seen in the most fascinating, futuristic projects emerging today, and it starts, he says, with being open and alert to what’s going on around you right now. Don’t be a futurist, he suggests: be a now-ist. via TEDTalks (video)

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TED: David Kwong: Two nerdy obsessions meet -- and it's magic - David Kwong (2014):

David Kwong is a magician who makes crossword puzzles — in other words, a pretty nerdy guy. And for his next trick … via TEDTalks (video)

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TED: Nicholas Negroponte: A 30-year history of the future - Nicholas Negroponte (2014):

MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte takes you on a journey through the last 30 years of tech. The consummate predictor highlights interfaces and innovations he foresaw in the 1970s and 1980s that were scoffed at then but are ubiquitous today. And he leaves you with one last (absurd? brilliant?) prediction for the coming 30 years. via TEDTalks (video)

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UXD: It's all about location, Part 3/3 Design for the real world:

UXD: It’s all about location, Part 3/3 Design for the real world

This episode of User Experience design for Developers will cover how to create awesome location-based smartphone apps for users on-the-go. This is the 3rd episode of a 3 part series, which…

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Google Developers

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UXD: It's all about location, Part 1/3 Design for the human hand:

UXD: It’s all about location, Part 1/3 Design for the human hand

This episode of User Experience design for Developers will cover how to create awesome location-based smartphone apps for users on-the-go. This is the first episode of a 3 part series, which…

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UXD: How to capture your user's attention, Part 2 / 2:

UXD: How to capture your user’s attention, Part 2 / 2

This episode of User Experience Design for Developers will cover how to capture your user’s attention to create compelling user experiences, by looking at how human memory works. This is the…

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