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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

7 Expert Monetization Tips - by Kyle Waring:

Hybrid Ad + In App Purchase (IAP) business model. Focus #1 on the player. Free 2 play (f2p) over Paid apps. Tracking. IAP Best practices. Best ad networks via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Dealing with Android resolutions - by Prafful Sahu:

How I dealt with the fragmented resolutions of Android on Unity via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Revolutionizing Free To Play - by Darius Alexander:

Sony announced that Sony Online Entertainment (SOE) would focus on creating FTP games. Ok great! We can expect more FTP games from Sony in the future, but whats this?! Capcom is entering the FTP market as well? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Cartoony Visuals for a Silly 3D Destructive Feline Game - by Chris Chung:

A few people have asked me how I get the art in Catlateral Damage to look the way it does, so I wanted to give an overview of my workflow using Blender and Unity. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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How Control Schemes Standardized Gameplay - by Josh Bycer:

An underrated importance of video games becoming mainstream was the standardization of control design and today’s post examines how this came to be with some lessons for new designers. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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PRETEND IT MATTERS: LUDUM DARE 30 - by nicholas ralabate:

making LUDOPHAGIC TIMEWAVE SOUND HYPERWHISTLE made me think of different things via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Mobile vs. PC and Microtransaction Psychology - by Josh Bycer:

Microtransactions have become important marketing tools for both PC and mobile titles. However despite having the same purpose, there are unique considerations that must be taken into account based on the platform. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Monetizing a Mobile Game (Part 1) - by Michael Sadowski:

What game monetization approaches are mobile game companies using, and which ones work? How can game makers strike a balance between annoying users and collecting some cash for their good work? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Branching Conversation Systems and the Working Writer, Part 1: Introduction - by Alexander Freed:

For decades, branching conversation systems have been a powerful tool in game narrative. In part one of a series dedicated to the art of branching dialogue writing, we define terms and discuss what kinds of games benefit most from such systems. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Learning to love free-to-play:

via Polygon - Full

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Optimizing Mobile Games In Unity - by nabeel saleem:

Good performance is critical specially for mobile devices.To give you some important techniques and info about making better performance we made this guide. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Spend A Quiet Few Minutes With Loop:

I have learned one very important thing from Loop: all games should have an ambient rain slider in their sound options. I’ll be contacting our John to get it on his next list. It is that most tranquil, serene of things and matches this simple puzzle game marvellously. You move hexagonal pieces around until lines […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Levolution is just a theory... - by Michael Barclay:

Designing for possibility, not inevitability. An excellent story has been a fundamental part of many great video games, but are there more ways for developers to create stories in collaboration with players? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Understanding High and Low Level Game Design - by Josh Bycer:

Understanding Game Design requires both an abstract and literal thought process and today’s post examines these two and how you can use them when trying to create a game. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Gamification: The users perspective - by Andrzej Marczewski:

What we need to to is step back from time to time and say “How will this actually impact the user”. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Titan Souls trailer showcases terrifying bosses, lovely scenery:

Pretty much every game these days not aimed at children wants to compare itself to Dark Souls, because, well, Dark Souls is awesome. But few manage to actually capture the sense of palm-sweating dread and majestic wonder that catapulted From Software’s experimental action-RPG series into an industry mainstay. Titan Souls may do just that, if this early trailer is any indication.

Developed by Chroma designer Mark Foster and his two cohorts at Acid Nerve, Titan Souls has one of those concepts that’s so bloody simple it’s a wonder no one has thought of it before. It essentially takes the premise of Shadow of the Colossus - wherein you must track down and slay several gigantic creatures in an otherwise uninhabited world - only the combat system is quicker, more reflex-driven, and much, much less forgiving.

Like Shadow of the Colossus’ obvious inspiration, Punch-Out!!, Titan Souls’ combat is extraordinarily simple to grasp, but difficult to master. You’re only granted one hit point and one arrow as you embark on your foolhardy quest. Thankfully, it’s a magic arrow and you can hold a button down to have it magically return to you. The downside is you can’t move when you’re summoning it, so you need to be very, very careful with your timing and positioning.

Read more…

via Eurogamer.net

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How I Teach game Design. (Lesson 3: Games and Rules ) - by Eric Zimmerman:

A series about what and how I teach. In this lesson: understanding the uses and limits of framing games by their rules, plus an exercise on the rules of Pac-Man and a mini-essay on games and formalism. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Game Design Deep Dive: Amnesia's 'Sanity Meter':

Amnesia: The Dark Descent’s “sanity meter” feature was born out of darkness. Creative director Thomas Grip explains the evolution of the meter’s design. …


via Gamasutra Feature Articles

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Shape Of The World Is A Growing Exploration Game:

Shape of the World is an “artistic exploration game where the world grows around you.” It’s being made by three game developers working in Vancouver: lead dev Stu Maxwell, who previously worked on Relic’s Space Marine; Athomas Goldberg doing “creatures”, who previously worked on animation systems at EA; and Brent Silk on sound and music. […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Dynamic 2D Character Lighting - by Oliver Franzke:

Good lighting can improve the visual quality of a game significantly. In this blog post I’ll describe various techniques for dynamic 2D character lighting that are very easy to implement and don’t require any additional assets (e.g. normal maps). via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Brain Putty - Teaching A Match-Three Has Never Been This Hard - by Charlie Silver:

"How do you re-teach players a genre they take for granted?" via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Selling a game before it's 'done': Tips and insight for paid alphas:

These days, some of the most successful games out there aren’t even out yet. …


via Gamasutra Feature Articles

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True stats of visibility part 2 - by Arturs Sosins:

You have seen the result of single app’s first month on the market without any marketing. Now it’s time to confirm or disapprove these results by the data of the second app. Will it be better or worse? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Animal Crossing DVD (New) > Merchandise:
Animal Crossing DVD (New)

Title : Animal Crossing DVD (New)
Publisher : Shogakukan
Game Type : DVD
Console : Merchandise

Price : £16.99

Following Ai as she moves to the town and gets a job at Nook’s store (who Genki trusts pays at least minimum wage…) A mystery message leads to the plot taking a twist, but lets leave it at that…

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Kunoichi > PS2:
Kunoichi

Title : Kunoichi
Publisher : Sega
Game Type : Action
Console : PS2

Price : £7.99

Kunoichi means female ninja and is named from the way woman is written in Japanese. Elegantly slice your way through Tokyo in order to obtain the pieces of the supernatural Akujiki sword.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Bomber Hehhe (New) > Dreamcast:
Bomber Hehhe (New)

Title : Bomber Hehhe (New)
Publisher : Fujicom
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : Dreamcast

Price : £39.99

Highly original title seeing you play as demolition man on a host of buildings with varying amounts of TNT. Key to successfully toppling the decrepit tower blocks is the positioning of the dynamite, yet care must be taken to not spray the area with debris thereby reducing your score. An arcade mode is also present allowing you to destroy the bulidings slightly less cerebrally using tanks, helicopters and cannons. Of course being a Japanese title your not limted to skyscrapers: shops, submarine oil rigs, even UFO’s come into the equation.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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6 Key Areas in Mobile Game Testing - by Ville-Veikko Helppi:

Mobile game testing differs from the regular mobile app testing. Effective mobile game testing derives from a well-structured and systematic approach, use of test automation framework and seamless integration with your agile process. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Entering the era of Auto-Mode - by Dominic Gelineau:

There is a new trend on the rise: Auto-Mode. This article discuss the good and the bad of letting your game play itself. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Rhythmic Shmup: Harmonix’s A City Sleeps:

In the deepest, darkest basement of Harmonix HQ, Alex Rigopulos is trying to make a rhythm game out of a Cherry Bakewell. He’s added coloured buttons to it, he’s patting it to a mamba beat, he’s jabbing the glacé cherry and making an airhorn noise with his mouth. They’ll try to turn anything and everything […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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CSV Fingerprint: Spot errors in your data at a glance:

CSV Fingerprint

You get your CSV file, snuggle under your blanket with a glass of fine wine, all ready for the perfect …

Tags: , ,

via FlowingData

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Teenage Engineering’s Tiny, $50 Drum Machine, Revealed in Videos:

It’s called the PO-12. It’s $50. It’s absolutely tiny – a little stand props it up, inspired by the Nintendo Game & Watch. And it’s already sounding like a drum machine. The drum machine first revealed to the world at a panel I moderated at Moogfest is finally, after manufacturing and customs delays, making its … Continue →

The post Teenage Engineering’s Tiny, $50 Drum Machine, Revealed in Videos appeared first on Create Digital Music.

via Create Digital Music

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Generic logos and why you should avoid them:

Designer Giovanni Tondini has created a comprehensive collection of generic…


via storm from the east branding & design consultancy, Tokyo

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The High-Tech Warfare Behind the Israel - Hamas Conflict: Taco Cowboy writes The Israel — Hamas conflict in Gaza is not only about bombs, missiles, bullets, but also about cyberwarfare, battles of the mind over social media, smart underground tunnels and cloud-based missile launching systems. The tunnels that Hamas has dug deep beneath Gaza are embedded with high tech gadgets, courtesy of Qatar, which has funded Hamas with billions to equipped their tunnels with intelligent sensors which are networked to control centers enabling the command and control staff to quickly notify operatives nearby that IDF units are advancing inside a certain tunnel, allowing for rapid deployment of attack units and the setting up of bobby traps inside the tunnel. In addition, Hamas has automated its rocket firing system using networked, cloud-based launching software provided by Qatar which can set off a rocket from any distance, and set them to go off at a specific time, using timers. “Anyone who thinks they have dozens of people sitting next to launchers firing rockets each time there is a barrage is mistaken,” said Aviad Dadon, a senior cyber-security adviser at several Israeli government ministries. While Doha is allowing Hamas to use its technology to fight Israel, it’s their own cyber-security the leaders of Qatar are worried about. For the Qataris, the war between Israel and Hamas is a proving ground to see how their investments in cyber systems have paid of — Qatar is very worried that one of its Gulf rivals — specifically Saudi Arabia — will use technology to attack it, and Qatar spends a great deal of money each year on shoring up its cyber-technology. Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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True stats of visibility on Android markets - by Arturs Sosins:

We all know that you should not expect miracles when publishing your app or game on appstores. But how bad is it really is?
How many downloads would an app get if it was not promoted or marketed?
And which markets are best to provide visibility for apps via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Systematic Inventive Thinking and Game Testing - by Johan Hoberg:

This article will explore how you can use the Systematic Inventive Thinking Method to generate tests with user behavior as a starting point. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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ChinaJoy Special: a Foreigner's Guide to Digital China - by Pascal Clarysse:

It’s ChinaJoy week. Some of you might be visiting China for the first time at this occasion. This summary guide will help you better grasp the current state of Digital China, and the gigantic opportunity it represents. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Why Games Don't Have to be Good Anymore - by Kevin Harwood:

The video game industry is entering market maturity and with that comes a string of quality issues. Here’s a quick look at what I mean. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Street Fighter X Tennis: Facepunch Reveal Deuce:

The revelation that Facepunch Studios were not working exclusively on Rust, but daring to prototype new games like Riftlight too (spoiler: this happens literally everywhere), sent some people on the Internet into a bit of a tizzy. “They are probably going to be even angrier to find out that we have three other prototypes being worked […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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The Devaluing of Game Design and the Market Impact - by Ulyana Chernyak:

The video game market has been steadily declining over the last few years which may be good for consumers, but paints a serious problem for game developers. Today’s post examines why this is happening and why it is a problem. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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The Most Dangerous Word In Software Development:

“Just put it up on a server somewhere.”

“Just add a favorite button to the right side of the item.”

“Just add [insert complex option here] to the settings screen.”

Usage of the word “just” points to a lot of assumptions being made. A few months ago, Brad Frost shared some thoughts on how the word applies to knowledge.

“Just” makes me feel like an idiot. “Just” presumes I come from a specific background, studied certain courses in university, am fluent in certain technologies, and have read all the right books, articles, and resources.

He points out that learning is never as easy as it is made to seem, and he’s right. But there is a direct correlation between the amount of knowledge you’ve acquired and the danger of the word “just.” The more you know, the bigger the problems you solve, and the bigger the assumptions are that are hiding behind the word.

Take the comment, “Just put it up on a server somewhere.” How many times have we heard that? But taking a side project running locally and deploying it on real servers requires time, money, and hard work. Some tiny piece of software somewhere will probably be the wrong version, and will need to be addressed. The system built locally probably isn’t built to scale perfectly.

“Just” implies that all of the thinking behind a feature or system has been done. Even worse, it implies that all of the decisions that will have to be made in the course of development have already been discovered—and that’s never the case.

Things change when something moves from concept to reality. As Dave Wiskus said on a recent episode of Debug, “everything changes when fingers hit glass.”

The favorite button may look fine on the right side, visually, but it might be in a really tough spot to touch. What about when favoriting isn’t the only action to be taken? What happens to the favorite button then?

Even once favoriting is built and in testing, it should be put through its paces again. In use, does favoriting provide enough value to warrant is existence? After all, “once that feature’s out there, you’re stuck with it.”

When you hear the word “just” being thrown around, dig deep into that statement and find all of the assumptions made within it. Zoom out and think slow.

Your product lives and dies by the decisions discovered between ideation and creation, so don’t just put it up on a server somewhere.

via A List Apart: The Full Feed

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Getting Back To Coding: New submitter rrconan writes I always feel like I’m getting old because of the constant need to learn a new tools to do the same job. At the end of projects, I get the impression that nothing changes — there are no real benefits to the new tools, and the only result is a lot of time wasted learning them instead of doing the work. We discussed this last week with Andrew Binstock’s “Just Let Me Code” article, and now he’s written a follow-up about reducing tool complexity and focusing on writing code. He says, “Tool vendors have several misperceptions that stand in the way. The first is a long-standing issue, which is ‘featuritis’: the tendency to create the perception of greater value in upgrades by adding rarely needed features. … The second misperception is that many tool vendors view the user experience they offer as already pretty darn good. Compared with tools we had 10 years ago or more, UIs have indeed improved significantly. But they have not improved as fast as complexity has increased. And in that gap lies the problem.’ Now I understand that what I thought of as “getting old” was really “getting smart.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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One cop in Seattle issues 80% of city's marijuana tickets:

An internal investigation revealed that the officer “flipped a coin when contemplating which subject to cite,” and that he called Washington’s legal marijuana law “silly.”
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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