Skip navigation
Help

recorder.sayforward.com

Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

Kim Kardashian's New Video Game Is Set To Rake In An Insane Amount:

Kim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian has expanded her empire to now include video games, and it’s proving to be a smart move for the 33-year-old reality star.

Kardashian’s first iOS game, “Kim Kardashian: Hollywood,” is already on track to earn over $200 million, reports Bloomberg News, citing industry-trend analysts.

Since its June 25 release, the game ranked as high as second in the most-downloaded free-apps category, is the only title among the top 10 in the App Store with a five-star rating, and shares of the game’s creator — Glu Mobile Inc. — have gone up 42%.

“It might be our biggest game of the year,” CEO Niccolo de Masi said in an interview. “We’re not surprised. Kim is a one-of-a-kind talent with an incredibly precise fit to the game engine that we tailored but already had in the company.”

Bloomberg reports that the Kardashian game “takes users inside Hollywood, guided by a virtual Kim who offers advice on how to become an A-list celebrity, starting from the so-called E-list.”

One of Mrs. Kanye West’s helpful tips? “Dating famous people will get you more fans, too.”

“While the game is free to play, the goal is to get users hooked on in-app purchases such as clothing or a burst of energy needed for traipsing through Hollywood,” according to Bloomberg. “Users can spend as much as $99.99 for 175,000 virtual dollars. A trip to Beverly Hills costs 4 game ‘dollars,’ while 400 will buy a necklace.”

Watch a trailer for the game below:

"This project has been an amazing experience," Kim told E! News on Monday. “I’m so excited that people are enjoying the game!”

Kardashian added, “I partnered last year with a fantastic company called Glu Mobile to create what is now the No. 3 Free and No. 5 Grossing game on the Apple App Store. We collaborated on every aspect of the game’s design details and continue to do so with the updates we are bringing out.” 

While the game could be Kardashian’s most lucrative deal ever, it’s not like she needs the money. The E! reality star — whose empire includes clothing, jewelry, and cosmetics — earned $28 million in the past year, Forbes estimated.

Kardashian has been documenting and promoting the game heavily via social media, specifically to her over 16 million Instagram followers:

Kim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video gameKim Kardashian video game

SEE ALSO:  Kim Kardashian Smacks Down The CEO Of Pepsi Over Women Not Having It All

MORE: Kanye West On Why Apple Is Like Kim Kardashian

Join the conversation about this story »






via Tech

0
Your rating: None

Mind-Bending GIFs Push the Limits of the Format:

Graphic artist Micaël Reynaud has been making a name for himself lately by playing with the technical limitations of the GIF, creating looped studies of perspective and motion that are unlike anything you’ve likely seen before.



via WIRED » Raw File

0
Your rating: None

Using SSD as a Foundation for New Generations of Flash Databases - Nati Shalom:

“You just can’t have it all” is a phrase that most of us are accustomed to hearing and that many still believe to be true when discussing the speed, scale and cost of processing data. To reach high speed data processing, it is necessary to utilize more memory resources which increases cost. This occurs because price increases as memory, on average, tends to be more expensive than commodity disk drive. The idea of data systems being unable to reliably provide you with both memory and fast access—not to mention at the right cost—has long been debated, though the idea of such limitations was cemented by computer scientist, Eric Brewer, who introduced us to the CAP theorem.

The CAP Theorem and Limitations for Distributed Computer Systems


via High Scalability

0
Your rating: None

Bitly: Lessons Learned Building a Distributed System that Handles 6 Billion Clicks a Month:

Have you ever wondered how bitly makes money? A URL shortener can’t be that hard to write, right? Sean O’Connor, Lead Application Developer at bitly, answers the how can bitly possibly make money question immediately in a talk he gave on bitly at the Bacon conference.

Writing a URL shortner that works is easy, says Sean, writing one that scales and is highly available, is not so easy.

Bitly doesn’t make money with a Shortening as a Service service, bitly makes money on an analytics product that mashes URL click data with with data they crawl from the web to help customers understand what people are paying attention to on the web. 

Analytics products began as a backend service that crawled web server logs. Logs contained data from annotated links along with cookie data to indicate where on a page a link was clicked, who clicked it, what the link was, etc. But the links all went back to the domain of the web site. The idea of making links go to a different domain than your own so that a 3rd party can do the analytics is a scary proposition, but it’s also kind of genius.

While this talk is not on bitly’s architecture, it is a thoughtful exploration on the nature of distributed systems and how you can solve bigger than one box problems with them.

Perhaps my favorite lesson from his talk is this one (my gloss):

SOA + queues + async messaging is really powerful. This approach isolates components, lets work happen concurrently, lets boxes fail independently, while still having components be easy to reason about.

I also really like his explanation for why event style messages are better than command style messages. I’ve never heard it put that way before.

Sean talks from a place of authentic experience. If you are trying to make a jump from a single box mindset to a multibox way of thinking, this talk is well worth watching. 

So let’s see what Sean has to say about distributed systems…

Stats


via High Scalability

0
Your rating: None

New kind of rotary engine - hypnotic!:

Duke Engines demonstrate a new kind of internal combustion engine, based on a crazy, hypnotic, rotary system. I lack the mechanical engineering chops to know whether this is any good, but it’s fun to watch.
(via Sploid) via Boing Boing

0
Your rating: None

What's behind Japan's Gundam game obsession?:

One of the most remarkable aspects about the Japanese arcade scene is that it still exists. Perhaps it’s because organised criminals loves to launder their money through arcades and pachinko parlours, or perhaps it’s just down to the reality that people still want to play games there.

More so than online gaming, arcade multiplayer is an intimate, rewarding experience. People are civil, you don’t have to contend with input lag - if you mess up it’s your fault, and not that of dodgy net code, and when things do go awry players are less likely to let off strings of expletives in public. Thanks to this intimacy, groups of players congregate into little communities. On a purely anthropological level, it’s actually rather fascinating.

The games and communities that endure are almost always those that have a solid multiplayer game at their centre. Traditionally these focal points of interest were the classic beat ‘em-ups of old - your Street Fighters or your King of Fighters - but over the last decade or so a new entry has managed to create similar fervor.

Read more…

via Eurogamer.net

0
Your rating: None

Emergence, Puzzles, and Playtesting - by Lewis Pulsipher:

Video: Emergent behavior, behavior unplanned and unanticipated by the designer, is a large part of what you’re looking for in playtesting. But depending on who you are, game designer, puzzle designer, game writer, you treat emergence in different ways. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Michael Bay – What is Bayhem ? Cinematography Study:

Michael Bay - What is Bayhem ? Cinematography Study

The post Michael Bay – What is Bayhem ? Cinematography Study appeared first on Halcyon Realms - Art Book Reviews - Anime, Manga, Film, Photography.

via Halcyon Realms - Art Book Reviews - Anime, Manga, Film, Photography

0
Your rating: None

BundesSans and BundesSerif — truly democratic typefaces: Three years ago MetaDesign Berlin asked us to design a custom Serif and Sans typeface for the German federal government. They had been assigned to redevelop the government’s corporate design with the typefaces as part of the update. The project was to cover all communication issued by the government and their ministries, online or offline, […]



Sponsored by Hoefler & Co.
and

BundesSans and BundesSerif — truly democratic typefaces

via I LOVE TYPOGRAPHY

0
Your rating: None

F2P and the Future of Games - by Daniel Slawson:

For the F2P model to work, gameplay has to be diluted, or segmented, before it reaches players. This is acceptable to some audiences, but anathema to others. There is another viable model: developers needn’t leave money on the table to compete with F2P. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Scaling the World Cup - How Gambify runs a massive mobile betting app with a team of 2:

This is a guest post by Elizabeth Osterloh and Tobias Wilke of cloudControl.

Startups face very different issues than big companies when they build software. Larger companies develop projects over much longer time frames and often have entire IT-departments to support them in creating customized architecture. It’s an entirely different story when a startup has a good idea, it gets popular, and they need to scale fast.

This was the situation for Gambify, an app for organizing betting games released just in time for the soccer World Cup. The company was founded and is run in Germany by only two people. When they managed to get a few major endorsements (including Adidas and the German team star Thomas Müller), they had to prepare for a sudden deluge of users, as well as very specific peak times.

The Gambify App: Basic Architecture


via High Scalability

0
Your rating: None

The World's Best Living Programmers: itwbennett (1594911) writes “How do you measure success? If it’s by Stack Overflow reputation, Google engineer Jon Skeet is the world’s best programmer. If it’s winning programming competitions, Gennady Korotkevich or Petr Mitrechev might be your pick. But what about Linus Torvalds? Or Richard Stallman? Or Donald Knuth? ITworld’s Phil Johnson has rounded up a list of what just might be the world’s top 14 programmers alive today.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

0
Your rating: None

A Google Employee Says Google Employees Are Too Confident, And Too Isolated From The Real World (GOOG):

Google Zurich Office 026

A Google employee has written a post about what it’s like working at the company. 

At his blog, Apenwarr, Google Fiber engineer Avery Pennarun is largely complimentary of Google and its employees: “I continue to be amazed at the overall smartness of people at this place. Overall, very nearly everybody, across the board, surprises or impresses me with how smart they are.”

However, Pennarun says, “Smart people have a problem, especially (although not only) when you put them in large groups. That problem is an ability to convincingly rationalize nearly anything.

Because smart people, especially computer-oriented smart people, tend to be logic oriented, they always find a rationale to support any conclusion. They also tend to avoid the chaotic, random, messy reality of the world where results don’t fit neatly into logically rational outcomes, says Pennarun.

This leads to misguided beliefs later in life. At Google, for instance, projects can be easily rationalized:

Working at a large, successful company lets you keep your isolation. If you choose, you can just ignore all the inconvenient facts about the world. You can make decisions based on whatever input you choose. The success or failure of your project in the market is not really that important; what’s important is whether it gets canceled or not, a decision which is at the whim of your boss’s boss’s boss’s boss, who, as your only link to the unpleasantly unpredictable outside world, seems to choose projects quasi-randomly, and certainly without regard to the quality of your contribution.

It’s a setup that makes it very easy to describe all your successes (project not canceled) in terms of your team’s greatness, and all your failures (project canceled) in terms of other people’s capriciousness. End users and profitability, for example, rarely enter into it. This project isn’t supposed to be profitable; we benefit whenever people spend more time online. This project doesn’t need to be profitable; we can use it to get more user data. Users are unhappy, but that’s just because they’re change averse. And so on.

As a result, Pennarum says people at Google are cursed with overconfidence. Because they’ve been so successful in life, they believe everything they do is successful and deserves a positive outcome. 

In fact, he says, “one of the biggest social problems currently reported at work is lack of confidence, also known as Impostor Syndrome.” The Impostor Syndrome hits people who aren’t quite as convinced that everything in the world is logical and therefore have a harder time rationalizing. 

Pennarun says these people are valuable. “Impostor Syndrome is that voice inside you saying that not everything is as it seems, and it could all be lost in a moment. The people with the problem are the people who can’t hear that voice.”

Read the whole thing here.

Via: Daring Fireball

Join the conversation about this story »






via Tech

0
Your rating: None

ATM Skimmers Are Getting So Good At Stealing Your Data It's Scary:

Krebs on Security (via Gizmodo) has the latest on super-small ATM “skimmers” — small devices that nefarious criminals attach to the mouth of an ATM that capture your credit or debit information when you swipe your card — and they’re only getting more advanced and harder to detect.

A new report from the European ATM Security Team outlines the rise of mini-skimmers, which actually sit inside the “throat” of at ATM, stealing data all day long while totally out of view.

One such skimmer, pictured below, works in cooperation with a tiny camera pointed at an ATM’s keypad. You swipe your card, the skimmer has your data. You enter your PIN, the camera captures you pushing the buttons. It’s totally vile, but it works.

atm skimmer

Here’s the camera setup — the device itself is pictured left, and its false cover leaves it in prime position on the ATM (pictured right) to scope your PIN number.

hidden cam

Often these skimmers will be powered by a mobile phone that transmits captured data via text message. They might also be facilitated by an MP3 player that stores data as sound, which can later be converted back to card data.

Krebs writes that “one of the simplest ways to protect yourself from ATM skimmers is to cover the PIN pad when you enter your digits. Still, you’d be surprised at how few ATM users actually take this simple but effective precaution.”

To learn more about skimmers and how they work, check out Krebs’ series on the topic.

SEE ALSO: Physicist says humans will no longer be the dominate species by 2045

Join the conversation about this story »






via Tech

0
Your rating: None

The Fast Follow in Mobile Gaming Is Obsolete - by Kevin Oke:

The Fast Follow strategy in mobile F2P games is in danger due to several key factors a) skyrocketing CPA, b) app store surfacing issues c) emerging new curation channels and d) major publishers as gatekeepers. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

SIGGRAPH Announces 2014 Computer Animation Festival Winners:

SIGGRAPH has announced the winners of its 41st annual Computer Animation Festival. These projects will be shown amongst more than 100 pieces at the 2014 conference that will take place August 10-14 in Vancouver, Canada. via Cartoon Brew

0
Your rating: None

Demystifying encodes and decodes of WebM:

Demystifying encodes and decodes of WebM

Tips, tricks and practices to encode a video into WebM using VPx codecs for delivery across the web and on Android.

From:
Google Developers

Views:
72


2
ratings

Time:
05:01

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Google I/O 2014 - Polymer and Web Components change everything you know about Web development:

Google I/O 2014 - Polymer and Web Components change everything you know about Web development

Speaker(s): Eric Bidelman Description: Web components are a game changer. Unlike other new features, the technologies are purely about developer productivity, solving many of web development’s…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
93


8
ratings

Time:
36:14

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Google I/O 2014 - Unlock the next era of UI development with Polymer:

Google I/O 2014 - Unlock the next era of UI development with Polymer

Speaker(s): Rob Dodson Description: Entering the multi-screen era means rethinking how we build our applications. Producing a few PSDs doesn’t cut it anymore, we have to start seeing the things…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
0


0
ratings

Time:
41:31

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Google I/O 2014 - Perfectly executing the wrong plan:

Google I/O 2014 - Perfectly executing the wrong plan

Speaker(s): Tomer Sharon Description: App developers ask themselves excellent questions about their users: Do people need my app? Can people use my app? Why do people sign up and then not…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
0


0
ratings

Time:
47:51

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Google I/O 2014 - Perf culture:

Google I/O 2014 - Perf culture

Speaker(s): Lara Swanson, Paul Lewis Description: With the rising tide of mobile traffic, we need to adapt our company cultures to prioritize the UX of the mobile user. What is the best way…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
1


0
ratings

Time:
27:30

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Google I/O 2014 - The next five billion gamers:

Google I/O 2014 - The next five billion gamers

Speaker(s): Colt McAnlis Description: In the coming decade, 5 billion people will come online for the first time; And with more than 3 billion hours a week spent playing games globally, make…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
1


0
ratings

Time:
27:01

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Solve for X - Scott Klemmer - Peer-to-Peer Mastery Learning:

Solve for X - Scott Klemmer - Peer-to-Peer Mastery Learning

Solve for X: People accelerating progress on technology moonshots. www.solveforx.com.

From:
Solve for X

Views:
5


0
ratings

Time:
10:37

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Solve for X

0
Your rating: None

DevArt - Art Made with Code: Exhibition Launch:

DevArt - Art Made with Code: Exhibition Launch

DevArt celebrates art made with code, by developers using technology as their canvas and code as their raw material to create innovative, interactive digital art installations. DevArt includes…

From:
Google Developers

Views:
3


0
ratings

Time:
01:21

More in
Science & Technology

via Uploads by Google Developers

0
Your rating: None

Extremely hard games - a new gerneration of game? - by Le Nhung:

The apperance of Flappy Bird at the beginning of 2014 opened a gerne of “Flappy bird” type. It must be said that many people are interested i the simple but extremely hard game like this. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

The Grey Side of Morality in Game Design - by Josh Bycer:

Morality is one of the harder points to get right in game design and narrative and today’s post examines why morality sliders just don’t work. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

4 type of MicroTransactions dissected. - by Simon Lachance:

Release a demo? Use a donate button? Pay for additional levels ? Let’s take a look at 4 type of MicroTransactions. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Multiple Methods of Microtransactions in Game Design - by Ulyana Chernyak:

Monetization comes in many forms and today’s post examines the types of microtransactions seen in games today and how they impact the customer’s experience. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Visualizing algorithms:

Starry Night sampled

Mike Bostock, who you might recognize from such things as Data-Driven Documents or the New York Times, writes on the … via FlowingData

0
Your rating: None

Understanding the Barriers of Play - by Josh Bycer:

In this reprint from Game-Wisdom, I examine how the barriers of playing a game have evolved with the rise of the Free to Play market. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Making Sense of Premium Currency - by Ulyana Chernyak:

Premium Currency has become not just a part of selling your game and microtranscations but plays into the design of your title. Today’s post examines what is premium currency and what you need to understand if you want to utilize it. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None

Aaron Swartz documentary, The Internet's Own Boy, out today:

The Internet’s Own Boy, Brian Knappenberger’s brilliant documentary about the life and death of Aaron Swartz, is out in cinemas and through on demand channels today. Read the rest

via Boing Boing

0
Your rating: None

KeyStore Vulnerability Affects 86% of Android Devices: jones_supa (887896) writes “IBM security researchers have published an advisory about an Android vulnerability that may allow attackers to obtain highly sensitive credentials, such as cryptographic keys for some banking services and virtual private networks, and PINs or patterns used to unlock vulnerable devices. It is estimated that the flaw affects 86 percent of Android devices. Android KeyStore has a little bug where the encode_key() routine that is called by encode_key_for_uid() can overflow the filename text buffer, because bounds checking is absent. The advisory says that Google has patched only version 4.4 of Android. There are several technical hurdles an attacker must overcome to successfully perform a stack overflow on Android, as these systems are fortified with modern NX and ASLR protections. The vulnerability is still considered to be serious, as it resides in one of the most sensitive resources of the operating system.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

0
Your rating: None

Techno in 3D: Industry-leading Korg synthesizer to rock Nintendo 3DS:

Cool visuals, more simultaneous sounds may result in Korg’s best emulation yet. via Ars Technica

0
Your rating: None

The future of visual effects and immersive content: The leading studio of digital effects and immersive experience look into the future and see VR, holodeck and mo-cap wonders
Phase_shift_image_of_cells_in_3D

To celebrate the launch of our summer issue, Future Shock and the Barbican’s Digital Revolution next month, we’re devoting a day to the brave new world of digital. From the future of smell to a Q&A with Oculus Rift, check back here throughout the day for more mind-bending glimpses into the future. 

"Wow, what does…

read more »

via Dazed

0
Your rating: None

Visualizing Algorithms: An anonymous reader writes “Many people reading this site probably have a functional understanding of how algorithms work. But whether you know algorithms down to highly mathematical abstractions or simple as a fuzzy series of steps that transform input into output, it can be helpful to visualize what’s going on under the hood. That’s what Mike Bostock has done in a new article. He walks through algorithms for sampling, shuffling, and maze generation, using beautiful and fascinating visualizations to show how each algorithm works and how it differs from other options. He says, “I find watching algorithms endlessly fascinating, even mesmerizing. Particularly so when randomness is involved. … Being able to see what your code is doing can boost productivity. Visualization does not supplant the need for tests, but tests are useful primarily for detecting failure and not explaining it. Visualization can also discover unexpected behavior in your implementation, even when the output looks correct. …Even if you just want to learn for yourself, visualization can be a great way to gain deep understanding. Teaching is one of the most effective ways of learning, and implementing a visualization is like teaching yourself.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

0
Your rating: None

Eyeo 2014: Field Reports from the trenches of Art + Tech:

In keeping with tradition, I’ve posted my slide deck from my recent talk at Eyeo 2014: Field Reports from the trenches of Art + Tech From a speaker perspective, Eyeo audiences are both demanding and tremendously rewarding. There’s no need to explain most basic principles, allowing you to dig further into the real meat of […] via Code & form

0
Your rating: None

The 12 Hottest Startups In Africa:

brck

Startups in Silicon Valley usually get all the attention, but there’s a slew of startups in Africa that are aiming to effect change in the continent. 

In fact, there are now more than 90 tech hubs in across Africa, according to the World Bank. These startups are tackling issues like education, connectivity, and transportation.

In 2013, U.S. investors poured more money into African startups than any other year, according to CrunchBase.

12. Obami is like Facebook for education.

Obami is a social learning platform that brings teachers, students, and parents together. It also aims to connect them with NGOs, small businesses, and corporations that are doing good. 

With Obami, people can connect with other educators and students, as well as create and share content.

Number of employees: 7

Funding: N/A

11. Spottm is a private social network for your neighborhood.

Spottm helps keep you connected with your neighbors. Besides being able to buy and sell goods, Spottm makes it easy to report crimes and other incidents in your neighborhood. 

The network is totally private and safe. When you sign up, you must verify your address. The entire site is also password protected.

Number of employees: N/A

Funding: N/A

10. mPawa helps people in Ghana and Kenya find jobs.

mPawa is a job-matching application for the blue-collar sector in Africa. With mPawa, companies can post job openings. For job-seekers, they can create an online resume that’s visible to employers on the platform.

Using the mPawa matching algorithm, workers get matched to jobs that fit their skill set. Employers can request workers on the go, and job-seekers will receive a notification via text or email. 

Number of employees: 3

Funding: N/A

See the rest of the story at Business Insider





via Tech

0
Your rating: None

The Makers Of The World's Tiniest Wireless Earbuds Shattered Their Kickstarter Goal:

Earin Earbuds

If the worst part about earbuds is the horrible tangle they create in your pocket, these Swedish earbuds have no worst part.

Earin launched its namesake product on Kickstarter earlier this month: the world’s smallest wireless headphones. It took less than two weeks for Earin to hit its $240,000 goal.

Often wireless headphones are still wired, just to each other. The Earin earbuds are completely wireless. At two centimeters long and less than a centimeter and a half wide, they’re two little bullet shaped buds that connect to your device over Bluetooth and should sound relatively nice, according to Fast Company.

Without a tangle of wires attached, tiny earbuds like these would probably be easy to lose. Earin comes with a capsule carrying case, which is just over six centimeters long and doubles as an on-the-go charger. This is pretty much necessary — Earin promises only three hours of music listening time at maximum. And at the retail price of $216, any wireless rocker will want to get the most they can out of these tiny titans.

SEE ALSO: The best smartphones in the world

Join the conversation about this story »






via Tech

0
Your rating: None

Mirador: A tool to help you find correlations in complex datasets:

Mirador

Mirador, a collaborative effort led by Andrés Colubri from Fathom Information Design, is a tool that helps you find correlative … via FlowingData

0
Your rating: None

Aided by books and ex-pats, Japanese learn to swear well in English:

"I tend to find Japanese people are very interested in swear words," writes Chris Broad, a British ex-pat living in Japan. Read the rest via Boing Boing

0
Your rating: None

A Contest of Play: Developing Competitive Game Design - by Josh Bycer:

Competitive games have become a big deal for gamers, designers and commentators involved and today’s post examines the common elements that make a game popular among the competitive community. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

0
Your rating: None
Syndicate content