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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

How League of Legends Scaled Chat to 70 million Players - It takes Lots of minions.:

How would you build a chat service that needed to handle 7.5 million concurrent players, 27 million daily players, 11K messages per second, and 1 billion events per server, per day?

What could generate so much traffic? A game of course. League of Legends. League of Legends is a team based game, a multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA), where two teams of five battle against each other to control a map and achieve objectives.

For teams to succeed communication is crucial. I learned that from Michal Ptaszek, in an interesting talk on Scaling League of Legends Chat to 70 million Players (slides) at the Strange Loop 2014 conference. Michal gave a good example of why multiplayer team games require good communication between players. Imagine a basketball game without the ability to call plays. It wouldn’t work. So that means chat is crucial. Chat is not a Wouldn’t It Be Nice feature.

Michal structures the talk in an interesting way, using as a template the expression: Make it work. Make it right. Make it fast.

Making it work meant starting with XMPP as a base for chat. WhatsApp followed the same strategy. Out of the box you get something that works and scales well…until the user count really jumps. To make it right and fast, like WhatsApp, League of Legends found themselves customizing the Erlang VM. Adding lots of monitoring capabilities and performance optimizations to remove the bottlenecks that kill performance at scale.

Perhaps the most interesting part of their chat architecture is the use of Riak’s CRDTs (commutative replicated data types) to achieve their goal of a shared nothing fueled massively linear horizontal scalability. CRDTs are still esoteric, so you may not have heard of them yet, but they are the next cool thing if you can make them work for you. It’s a different way of thinking about handling writes.

Let’s learn how League of Legends built their chat system to handle 70 millions players…

Stats


via High Scalability

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Facebook Mobile Drops Pull For Push-based Snapshot + Delta Model:

We’ve learned mobile is different. In If You’re Programming A Cell Phone Like A Server You’re Doing It Wrong we learned programming for a mobile platform is its own specialty. In How Facebook Makes Mobile Work At Scale For All Phones, On All Screens, On All Networks we learned bandwidth on mobile networks is a precious resource. 

Given all that, how do you design a protocol to sync state (think messages, comments, etc.) between mobile nodes and the global state holding servers located in a datacenter?

Facebook recently wrote about their new solution to this problem in Building Mobile-First Infrastructure for Messenger. They were able to reduce bandwidth usage by 40% and reduced by 20% the terror of hitting send on a phone.

That’s a big win…that came from a protocol change.

Facebook Messanger went from a traditional notification triggered full state pull:

via High Scalability

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Paper: Actor Model of Computation: Scalable Robust Information Systems:

With Reactive Systems becoming the new old hotness, it will help to have a thorough grounding in the Actor Model. Here’s a good start. Carl Hewitt in Actor Model of Computation: Scalable Robust Information Systems gives a very thorough and relatively concise explanation of the Actor model.

Here’s the abstract.

The Actor model is a mathematical theory that treats “Actors” as the universal primitives of concurrent digital computation. The model has been used both as a framework for a theoretical understanding of concurrency, and as the theoretical basis for several practical implementations of concurrent systems. Unlike previous models of computation, the Actor model was inspired by physical laws. It was also influenced by the programming languages Lisp, Simula 67 and Smalltalk-72, as well as ideas for Petri Nets, capability-based systems and packet switching. The advent of massive concurrency through client-cloud computing and many-core computer architectures has galvanized interest in the Actor model.

Actor technology will see significant application for integrating all kinds of digital information for individuals, groups, and organizations so their information usefully links together. Information integration needs to make use of the following information system principles:
    * Persistence. Information is collected and indexed.
    * Concurrency: Work proceeds interactively and concurrently, overlapping in time.
    * Quasi-commutativity: Information can be used regardless of whether it initiates new work or become relevant to ongoing work.
    * Sponsorship: Sponsors provide resources for computation, i.e., processing, storage, and communications.
    * Pluralism: Information is heterogeneous, overlapping and often inconsistent.
    * Provenance: The provenance of information is carefully tracked and recorded

The Actor Model is intended to provide a foundation for inconsistency robust information integration.

Related Articles


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Microservices in Production - the Good, the Bad, the it Works:

This is a guest repost written by Andrew Harmel-Law on his real world experiences with Microservices. The original article can be found here.

It’s reached the point where it’s even a cliche to state “there’s a lot written about Microservices these days.” But despite this, here’s another post on the topic. Why does the internet need another? Please bear with me…

We’re doing Microservices. We’re doing it based on a mash-up of some “Netflix Cloud” (as it seems to becoming known - we just call it “Archaius / Hystrix”), a gloop of Codahale Metrics, a splash of Spring Boot, and a lot of Camel, gluing everything together. We’ve even found time to make a bit of Open Source ourselves - archaius-spring-adapter - and also contribute some stuff back.

Lets be clear; when I say we’re “doing Microservices”, I mean we’ve got some running; today; under load; in our Production environment. And they’re running nicely. We’ve also got a lot more coming down the dev-pipe.

All the time we’ve been crafting these we’ve been doing our homework. We’ve followed the great debate, some contributions of which came from within Capgemini itself, and other less-high-profile contributions from our very own manager. It’s been clear for a while that, while there is a lot of heat and light generated in this debate, there is also a lot of valid inputs that we should be bearing in mind.

Despite this, the Microservices architectural style is still definitely in the honeymoon period, which translates personally into the following: whenever I see a new post on the topic from a Developer I respect my heart sinks a little as I open it and read… Have they discovered the fatal flaw in all of this that everyone else has so far missed? Have they put their finger on the unique aspect that mean 99% of us will never realise the benefits of this new approach and that we’re all off on a wild goose chase? Have they proven that Netflix really are unicorns and that the rest of us are just dreaming?

Despite all this we’re persisting. Despite always questioning every decision we make in this area far more than we normally would, Microservices still feel right to us for a whole host of reasons. In the rest of this post I hope I’ll be able to point out some of the subtleties which might have eluded you as you’ve researched and fiddled, and also, I’ve aimed to highlight some of the old “givens” which might not be “givens” any more.

The Good

via High Scalability

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Improve small job completion times by 47% by running full clones.:

The idea is most jobs are small. Researchers found 82% of jobs on Facebook’s cluster were less than 10 tasks. Clusters have a median utilization of under 20%. And since small jobs are particularly sensitive to stragglers the audacious solution is to proactively launch clones of a job as they are submitted and pick the result from the earliest clone. The result is an average completion time of all the small jobs improved by 47% using cloning, at the cost of just 3% extra resources.

For more details take a look at the very interesting Why Let Resources Idle? Aggressive Cloning of Jobs with Dolly.

Related Articles


via High Scalability

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Nifty Architecture Tricks from Wix - Building a Publishing Platform at Scale:

Wix operates websites in the long tale. As a HTML5 based WYSIWYG web publishing platform, they have created over 54 million websites, most of which receive under 100 page views per day. So traditional caching strategies don’t apply, yet it only takes four web servers to handle all the traffic. That takes some smart work.

Aviran Mordo, Head of Back-End Engineering at Wix, has described their solution in an excellent talk: Wix Architecture at Scale. What they’ve developed is in the best tradition of scaling is specialization. They’ve carefully analyzed their system and figured out how to meet their aggressive high availability and high performance goals in some most interesting ways.

Wix uses multiple datacenters and clouds. Something I haven’t seen before is that they replicate data to multiple datacenters, to Google Compute Engine, and to Amazon. And they have fallback strategies between them in case of failure.

Wix doesn’t use transactions. Instead, all data is immutable and they use a simple eventual consistency strategy that perfectly matches their use case.

Wix doesn’t cache (as in a big caching layer). Instead, they pay great attention to optimizing the rendering path so that every page displays in under 100ms.

Wix started small, with a monolithic architecture, and has consciously moved to a service architecture using a very deliberate process for identifying services that can help anyone thinking about the same move.

This is not your traditional LAMP stack or native cloud anything. Wix is a little different and there’s something here you can learn from. Let’s see how they do it…

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Follow the Code - by Paul Furio:

Software projects are often full of unseen paths and corner cases. Best Practices are to follow these when they’re discovered, instead of making inaccurate assumptions that will come back to bite you later. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Games need Stories - by Stephen Ashby:

Developers should tell more stories with their games. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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12 Scientific Sculptures: Intangible Data in Physical Form:

Mathematical theorems, the physics of an object moving through space, and intangible scientific data are visualized three-dimensionally and made into works of via WebUrbanist

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Tor Project Mulls How Feds Took Down Hidden Websites: HughPickens.com writes: Jeremy Kirk writes at PC World that in the aftermath of U.S. and European law enforcement shutting down more than 400 websites (including Silk Road 2.0) which used technology that hides their true IP addresses, Tor users are asking: How did they locate the hidden services? “The first and most obvious explanation is that the operators of these hidden services failed to use adequate operational security,” writes Andrew Lewman, the Tor project’s executive director. For example, there are reports of one of the websites being infiltrated by undercover agents and one affidavit states various operational security errors.” Another explanation is exploitation of common web bugs like SQL injections or RFIs (remote file inclusions). Many of those websites were likely quickly-coded e-shops with a big attack surface. Exploitable bugs in web applications are a common problem says Lewman adding that there are also ways to link transactions and deanonymize Bitcoin clients even if they use Tor. “Maybe the seized hidden services were running Bitcoin clients themselves and were victims of similar attacks.” However the number of takedowns and the fact that Tor relays were seized could also mean that the Tor network was attacked to reveal the location of those hidden services. “Over the past few years, researchers have discovered various attacks on the Tor network. We’ve implemented some defenses against these attacks (PDF), but these defenses do not solve all known issues and there may even be attacks unknown to us.” Another possible Tor attack vector could be the Guard Discovery attack. The guard node is the only node in the whole network that knows the actual IP address of the hidden service so if the attacker manages to compromise the guard node or somehow obtain access to it, she can launch a traffic confirmation attack to learn the identity of the hidden service. “We’ve been discussing various solutions to the guard discovery attack for the past many months but it’s not an easy problem to fix properly. Help and feedback on the proposed designs is appreciated.” According to Lewman, the task of hiding the location of low-latency web services is a very hard problem and we still don’t know how to do it correctly. It seems that there are various issues that none of the current anonymous publishing designs have really solved. “In a way, it’s even surprising that hidden services have survived so far. The attention they have received is minimal compared to their social value and compared to the size and determination of their adversaries.” Share on Google+

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Expat activists and journalists leave USA for Berlin's safety:

From Laura Poitras to Jacob Appelbaum to Sarah Harrison, Berlin has become a haven for American journalists, activists and whistleblowers who fear America’s unlimited appetite for surveillance and put their trust in Germany’s memory of the terror of the Stasi.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Interactive map of social enterprise models:

Verynice, the fascinating (and very nice!) design consultancy that does 50% of its work pro bono, created a Models of Impact Interactive Map attempting to “document every business model in social enterprise, ever.” Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption: Presto Vivace points out this troubling new report from the Electronic Frontier Foundation: Recently, Verizon was caught tampering with its customer’s web requests to inject a tracking super-cookie. Another network-tampering threat to user safety has come to light from other providers: email encryption downgrade attacks. In recent months, researchers have reported ISPs in the U.S. and Thailand intercepting their customers’ data to strip a security flag — called STARTTLS — from email traffic. The STARTTLS flag is an essential security and privacy protection used by an email server to request encryption when talking to another server or client. By stripping out this flag, these ISPs prevent the email servers from successfully encrypting their conversation, and by default the servers will proceed to send email unencrypted. Some firewalls, including Cisco’s PIX/ASA firewall do this in order to monitor for spam originating from within their network and prevent it from being sent. Unfortunately, this causes collateral damage: the sending server will proceed to transmit plaintext email over the public Internet, where it is subject to eavesdropping and interception. Share on Google+

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Random Darknet Shopper: Internet art randomly spends $100/wk of Bitcoin in darknet:


It’s part of a Swiss gallery exhibit called The Darknet: From Memes to Onionland, where all the random junk the algorithm buys (from ecstasy to fire brigade master-keys to boxed Tolkien sets) are displayed.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Densha de Go EX (New) > SegaSaturn:
Densha de Go EX (New)

Title : Densha de Go EX (New)
Publisher : Takara
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £19.99

Taito left the programming duties for this Saturn conversion to Takara making this feel a little different to the other versions. Includes lots of types of trains, as well as different routes along with some extra unlockable clips of train footage. But the main draw are the winter versions of the famous lines such as the Yamanote complete with snow falls and the remixed soundtrack. Best savoured with the dedicated controller.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Strip Fighter II (New) > PCEngineHuCard:
Strip Fighter II (New)

Title : Strip Fighter II (New)
Publisher : Games Express
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : PCEngineHuCard

Price : £79.99

Taking the Street Fighter II engine and substituting in an all female cast, victory over your opponent is rewarded after the first round with a screen shot of them in their underwear; complete victory sees them naked. Some suggestive statues in the Medusa stage. With Brazilian Amanda’s special move the ‘Breast Bomber’, Ryu, Ken and co. wouldn’t stand a chance!

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Pukunpa > SegaSaturn:
Pukunpa

Title : Pukunpa
Publisher : Athena
Game Type : Puzzle
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £12.99

Clever twist on the puzzle formula in that the falling smiley blocks also sometimes contain two different coloured blocks adding an extra dimension to gameplay and making for some satisfying combo’s. There are also stoney faced blocks that can’t be destroyed so its best to concentrate and not to pay too much attention to what your character of an all girl cast is up to in the background, bikini clad or not.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Cyborg 009 > MegaCD:
Cyborg 009

Title : Cyborg 009
Publisher : Riot
Game Type : Action
Console : MegaCD

Price : £24.99

Based on the classic manga series of robots with a human conscience makes this a very collectable title. Unlike some manga games, it is perfectly accessible to Western gamers being action based with Telenet’s crack, cult outfit Riot set loose on the title making good use off the rich and imaginative characterisation.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Pretty Fighter X > SegaSaturn:
Pretty Fighter X

Title : Pretty Fighter X
Publisher : Imagineer
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £14.99

Risque girl on girl fighting game originally on the Super Famicom, all aspects of the title have been improved as you’d expect. The developers have also tweaked the saucy-ness factor in the move away from Nintendo with it now warranting a yellow over 18’s badge from Sega.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Policenauts > SegaSaturn:
Policenauts

Title : Policenauts
Publisher : Konami
Game Type : Simulation
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £11.99

Hideo Kojima follows on from the seminal ‘Snatcher’ is this Blade Runner-esque digitised adventure set in the space age future. Shows the experimentation at work combining film and game media that would come to greater prominence in the ‘Metal Gear’ series. Includes light gun sections.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Wizards Harmony > SegaSaturn:
Wizards Harmony

Title : Wizards Harmony
Publisher : Arc System Works
Game Type : Sports
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £4.99

A simulation style adventure where players have to watch their language or risk upsetting one of the female stars of the game. As such players can pick up some useful phrases, if care must be taken to not sound too feminine. Stars of the show cover a range of personalities and care must be taken as such to not get a verbal tirade unleashed against the player.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Why it’s not that bad to take a step back, from a Game Art student’s perspective - by Brenda van Vugt:

In this piece I give my opinion about a problem I see almost every day and a lot of you will probably recognise. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Waku Waku 7 > SegaSaturn:
Waku Waku 7

Title : Waku Waku 7
Publisher : Sunsoft
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : SegaSaturn

Price : £14.99

Conversion of the Neo Geo fun filled grappler, light hearted; but finely crafted box of tricks. Sequel to Galaxy Fight.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Akihabara Pies (New) (Sale) > Dreamcast:
Akihabara Pies (New) (Sale)

Title : Akihabara Pies (New) (Sale)
Publisher : Sega
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : Dreamcast

Price : £4.99

A tribute to Tokyo’s brightest district that lights up to the God of neon and is full of devotees to all things PVC and video game related. This title used the sadly defunct Dreamcast net to allow players customized characters to battle it out about all things a good otaku should know. Clever use of the systems VMU too.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Glowy Death Abounds In Daedalus – No Escape:

Lasers, glistening biceps, and corrugated labyrinths, oh my! Is there any way to make space marine-driven arena shooters better? If you were Daedalus – No Escape, you’d say something like, “Of course! By turning it into a top-down affair, naturally.” Out now on Steam, Daedalus looks like a slick, violent conflagration where only the best […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Bombuzal (Cart Only) > SuperFamicom:
Bombuzal (Cart Only)

Title : Bombuzal (Cart Only)
Publisher : Kemco
Game Type : Puzzle
Console : SuperFamicom

Price : £4.99

Genki has whittled away many an hour playing Bombuzal. Sadly not so many hours are on offer to whittle away, but it it one of those games that could prove not all hours pass at the same rate. The reassuring lift music may help, but the crux of the action involves detonating all bombs on screen. Action can be viewed from an isometric or overhead viewpoint to ensure the detonation doesn’t take out the player too or that the crumbling path that can only be crossed once is the right order to proceedings.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Banana (Cart Only) > FamicomCart:
Banana (Cart Only)

Title : Banana (Cart Only)
Publisher : Victor
Game Type : Puzzle
Console : FamicomCart

Price : £6.99

Players manoeuvre around the screen collecting the fruit and vegetables on offer (and non – banana fans are catered for, if there are those non too partial to Britain’s favourite fruit.) Plenty of blocks can be dislodged by passing under them and care must be taken to plan the route to the goal carefully, ideally dropping a block on the alien adversary’s bonce (though he is quite a loveable companion most of the time.)

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Desert Strike > SuperFamicom:
Desert Strike

Title : Desert Strike
Publisher : Electronic Arts
Game Type : Shooter
Console : SuperFamicom

Price : £14.99

Desert Strike caused quite a storm when released with its tight controls and excellent mission based gameplay from taking out power stations to rescuing POW, you really felt the power of the chopper to make a difference. Completing a level rewarded a mini sequence of politically charged cinematics. The final level required various briefings to be completed in the one mission and having gone through so much hard work the fear of being shot down was overwhelming.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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You bet your life: Jason Rohrer on his upcoming game that requires betting money:

Last month, satire site The Onion ran a story on Shinji Mikami’s survival-horror game The Evil Within. The headline: "New Video Game ‘Horrifying’ For Anyone Who’s Never Experienced Terror Of Real Life".

"The monsters will what? Take all of the money out of my daughter’s college fund?" balked fake anchor Chad Williams. It’s a good laugh for folks with a high fear tolerance, but if the fictional Mr. Williams were to exist he’d be about to meet his non-fictional match with Jason Rohrer’s upcoming game Cordial Minuet, a game that can only be played by betting real world money.

I’ve detailed Cordial Minuet before, but here’s a quick recap: two players are each given the same six-by-six grid, though one player will see it flipped 90 degrees so their rows are their opponent’s columns. This is no ordinary grid, however, as it’s what numerologists call a Magic Square, wherein each row, column and diagonal add up to the same value. In the case of a six-by-six grid, the numbers 1-36 will culminate in 111 across each axis.

Read more…

via Eurogamer.net

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Implementing a replay system in Unity and how I'd do it differently next time - by Auston Montville:

Due to the fact that certain aspects of Unity are non deterministic, building a replay system that only saves the game’s input took a little bit of effort. Find out how to get around Unity’s non deterministic systems for efficient replays. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Internal Section > PlayStation:
Internal Section

Title : Internal Section
Publisher : Squaresoft
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : PlayStation

Price : £11.99

Joining a rather exclusive and cliquey genre being similar to Tempest and Rez, in I.S. the players ship stays in contact with a tunnel wall at all times as enemies advance along it. To take them out the ship rotates around the wall, but its actually the wall that moves to avoid causing motion sickness with the ship staying rooted to the bottom of the tunnel. The boss in waiting allows the ship to move more freely and test out the full arsenal with weapons based on the Chinese Zodiac. Gooey, garish, psychedelic graphics and a pulsating techno soundtrack add to the tranced out feeling when being in the hole too long. But it does look rather special and a tribute to Squaresofts genre defying approach.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Lets Slime > PlayStation:
Lets Slime

Title : Lets Slime
Publisher : Tohoku Shinsha
Game Type : Simulation
Console : PlayStation

Price : £4.99

A Slime breeding game which involves building up the world for these loveable lumps of jelly. Strangely compelling drawing you into their slippery slope like an exotic flower.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Psyvariar 2 Ultimate Final (Sale) > PS2:
Psyvariar 2 Ultimate Final (Sale)

Title : Psyvariar 2 Ultimate Final (Sale)
Publisher : Success
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PS2

Price : £21.99

Succesfully accomplishing a mission brings unlockable CG shots adding to the desire to defy death and the volleys of projectiles and barrages of bullets. The roll feature makes a welcomed return giving breathing space for a brief respite. Comes with bonus ‘Special Capture DVD’ with plenty of extras, movies and music. Some of the movie clips defy belief and provide valuable tactical info to help you get through tight spots.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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The Shooting Double Shienryu > PS2:
The Shooting Double Shienryu

Title : The Shooting Double Shienryu
Publisher : D3
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PS2

Price : £19.99

The solid shooter Shienryu gets a bargain PS2 release with both Shienryu (with full verticle mode this time) and Shienryu Explosion crammed on the disk. Shienryu is a traditional shooter in the Raiden mould where as Explosion has flashier graphics utitlising the PS2’s lighting library and smoke screen effect to the max. It also tosses power ups at you like sweeties allowing you to let rip until your hearts content against the incoming vessels.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Wild Arms > PS2:
Wild Arms

Title : Wild Arms
Publisher : Sony
Game Type : RPG
Console : PS2

Price : £6.99

Wild Arms has a loyal band of followers and its fine combat engine makes it worthy of such dedicated support. Turn based combat with shouts and cries to make you think each blow is going to be your last sustained, such are the dramatic exclamations. And power to the over the top pyrotechnics involved in each assault, not that they need any extra power. Subtitled The Fourth Denominator.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Generation of Chaos > PS2:
Generation of Chaos

Title : Generation of Chaos
Publisher : Idea Factory
Game Type : RPG
Console : PS2

Price : £5.99

Fantasy themed, turn based RPG that keeps going from strength to strength. Draws gamers in gently with a nice cup of tea, before getting them to drink from its potent elixir.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Study Shows Direct Brain Interface Between Humans: vinces99 writes University of Washington researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago. In the newly published study, which involved six people, researchers were able to transmit the signals from one person’s brain over the Internet and use these signals to control the hand motions of another person within a split second of sending that signal. Share on Google+

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Designing a “playable” UI that secretly teaches how to play - by Yowan Langlais:

A thorough breakdown of how we designed a fully “playable” UI for our local-multiplayer party game, Toto Temple Deluxe! via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Today In Real Game Names – REVOLVER360 RE:ACTOR:

Well, you’re not going to be unable to find it from googling, at least. REVOLVER360 RE:ACTOR, which I’m bowing to the capitalised stylisation of because it’s rad as hell, was brought to my attention by a comment in this weeks What Are You Playing? The ridiculosity of its name grabbed my interest, followed by its light-show […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Alternative Sales Strategies for Digital Stores: Marketing Events - by Ulyana Chernyak:

Concluding this series on alternative sales strategies, we turn to the recent uses of marketing events by developers and stores to raise visibility and sales via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Isaac Asimov on creativity (1959):

In 1959, Isaac Asimov penned an essay about the nature of creativity that was never published until it was recently discovered in a file by an old friend. Read the rest via Boing Boing

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F1 racing winners and age:

F1 racing winners and age

So here’s a sport I don’t see or hear much about. F1 racing, which requires a different sort of strength …

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via FlowingData

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WATCH: Photo Math, a smartphone camera calculator:

I’m math-brain handicapped, and wish I’d had this all my life. Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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A Defense of Randomness in Competitive Games - by Brian Rockwell:

Competitive play in all mediums engages players and spectators, but digital games are uniquely positioned to take advantage of randomness in a way with which physical games would be ill-equipped to replicate. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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League of Legends - The Potential of A/B Testing - by Eduardo Cabrera:

The purpose of this entry is to focus on the properties of A/B testing and how it can impact the game League of Legends by Riot Games and the eSports scene. First we must define A/B Testing; it’s a method used to test two or more features simultaneously. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Why Players Can't Stop Playing Destiny - by Cary Chichester:

Looking at some of the reasons players have for wanting to quit Destiny and why they are still hooked. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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