Skip navigation
Help

Academia

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Plenty of movies use some version of the “nerd experience” to create comedy and sympathetic characters. The lovable loser who learns to fit in with society — or who teaches society how to get along with him — is a standard archetype at this point.

But no other film nails the emotions of being a hardcore nerd like Zero Charisma. The film is the story of Scott, a domineering but lonely guy who controls his own little geek clique as the dungeon master of a long-running role-playing game. His minor social standing is threatened by the intrusion of the funny, good-looking Miles, a guy who seems to be everything Scott cannot become.

Zero Charisma is right on the money when it comes to capturing the personal interactions, obsessions, and insecurities of nerd culture. It can be uncomfortably familiar, but it is hilariously funny as it simultaneously skewers and embraces members of true nerddom. Check out a trailer below.

Zero Charisma is available digitally October 8, and in theaters October 11. Apple has the trailer.

0
Your rating: None


Neural Computation: Markus Meister at TEDxCaltech

Markus Meister is professor of biology at the Caltech. He studied physics in Germany and then at Caltech, where he received his Ph.D. (1987). After postdoctoral research at Stanford, Markus moved to Harvard University, where he held the Jeff C. Tarr Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology until 2012. Last summer he finally followed the siren song of Southern California and returned to his roots. Markus has been studying how large circuits of nerve cells work. In particular, his research opened a window onto the sophisticated computations performed by the retina. His long-term goal is a framework akin to electronics by which one can understand how structure and function of the neural circuits are related. He received the Lawrence C. Katz Prize for Innovative Research in Neuroscience and the Golden Brain Award for Vision and Brain Research from the Minerva Foundation. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) On January 18, 2013, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech: The Brain, a forward-looking celebration of <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
37

7
ratings
Time:
16:33
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None


Can We Expand Our Consciousness with Neuroprosthetics?: Malcolm MacIver at TEDxCaltech

Malcolm Maclver's formative years were as a grade four dropout living with his off-the-grid parents in a remote part of northern Ontario, Canada. He's since overcompensated by getting training in a host of disciplines including computer science, philosophy, neuroscience, and engineering, and is now a professor of engineering and neurobiology at Northwestern University. He works on the relationship between how animals move and how they sense their environment. He also develops technology based on exotic movement and sensing capabilities of animals. He pioneered the development of a new sensor inspired by the ability of certain fish to sense using a self-generated electric field. This new technology holds great promise for enabling work around oil spills or in submerged vessels where ordinary vision is useless. He has served as science advisor for several sci-fi TV series and movies, blogs about science for Discover magazine, and develops science-inspired interactive art installations that have exhibited internationally. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
940

29
ratings
Time:
16:38
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None


The Social Brain: Ralph Adolphs at TEDxCaltech

Ralph Adolphs obtained his Ph.D. at Caltech in 1993, subsequently conducted postdoctoral work with Antonio Damasio in lesion patients, and has been on the faculty at Caltech since 2004. Ralph's laboratory includes undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and staff that all work on elucidating the neural underpinnings of social behavior. The lab studies several clinical populations, including neurosurgical patients, individuals with rare brain lesions, and people with autism. Extensive use is also made of the adjacent Caltech Brain Imaging Center, which Ralph directs, and there are close collaborations with other laboratories at Caltech in both the divisions of biology and the humanities and social sciences. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) On January 18, 2013, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech: The Brain, a forward-looking celebration of humankind's quest to understand the brain, by exploring the past, present and future of neuroscience. Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
238

12
ratings
Time:
15:17
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None

The photographic voice of the English photographer Stephen Gill always has a playfully inventive ring. His book ‘Hackney Wick’ (Nobody, 2005), named after an area in east London where the photographs were made, is comprised of pictures taken with a cheap plastic lens camera he bought at a flea market in Hackney Wick for 50 pence. For his book ‘Hackney Flowers’ (Nobody, 2007) he gathered plants, flowers, and seeds, arranging the material over photographs (which he then re-photographed) — creating complex dimensional collage. For other series, he has buried prints to “allow the place itself to imprint upon the images through decay or markings;” or placed objects and creatures inside his camera creating images akin to in-camera “photograms” as seen in his book ‘Outside In’ (Photoworks, 2010).

So when the Centre National de L’Audiovisuel in Luxembourg commissioned Gill to create a new body of work and a book responding to an industrial wasteland that is the remains of the steel-making industry in the city of Dudelange, it seemed to be a perfect fit for an artist who is known to physically integrate the surroundings into the process and final results of his work. Gill’s newest book Coexistence has just been co-published by the Centre National de L’Audiovisuel and Gill’s own book imprint Nobody.

Concentrating on a pond that had once been used to cool the factory blast furnaces as recently as 2006, Gill became curious about the newly forming microscopic communities of life that would be returning and flourishing. As he writes in the afterword to ‘Coexistence’; “For eight months leading up to my first visit to the territory, my mind increasingly started tuning into the microscopic worlds within worlds, and I became ever more aware of the many parallels between patterns and process in the pond and those in our own lives as individual humans within societies…Slowly I became committed to the idea of attempting to bring these two apparently disparate worlds — so physically close yet so different in scale – visually closer together.”

In order to draw these two worlds together Gill employed the use of a medical microscope from the University of Luxembourg and a pail of water scooped from the pond. With the microscope, he studied and photographed the miniscule creatures and plant life. Carrying around the pail of water, he would dunk his underwater camera into it prior to making portraits of residents he met in Dudelange. The results, page after page, have your mind jumping back and forth between the recognizable and the indistinguishable — the scientific and the conceptual.

One might be tempted to dismiss Gill’s strategies as gimmicks were it not for the immediate beauty and complexity of the images. Admittedly this writer has questioned his cleverness, on occasion, as “the idea” dominating the actual content (dipping prints into the pond water to transfer life onto the surface of the paper), but I find the two approaches to image making here flow together into the ‘tapestry’ that Gill expresses as his intent.

With its gold foil stamped titles and speckled book block edge, ‘Coexistence’ is handsomely made to resemble a leather, quarter-bound, reference book that might be seen sitting aside Darwin’s On the Origin of the Species. That is, after all, the ultimate metaphor here – the primordial sludge finding its footing and slipping seamlessly into society.

Stephen Gill is a British photographer based in London.

Jeffrey Ladd is a photographer, writer, editor and founder of Errata Editions.

0
Your rating: None


What Are You Waiting For? | Keith Harmon Snow at TEDxShelburneFalls

3 November 2012 | Sharing insightful personal experiences and stunning photographs from near and far, Keith Harmon Snow explores a few pressing questions about consciousness, life purpose and the personal and societal changes that are required from all of us in service to building a better world. A former aerospace & defense professional who later worked as a genocide investigator for the United Nations, Keith is a local small farmer from Williamsburg, Massachusetts, USA, a war correspondent and photographer. He was the 2009 Regent's Lecturer in Law and Society at the University of California Santa Barbara. He has worked in 44 countries, he is 'persona non grata' in Rwanda and Ethiopia, and he is also banned (for life) from Hampshire, Smith and Mt. Holyoke Colleges in Western Massachusetts. A facilitator of consciousness workshops, he describes himself as "... a spiritual seeker learning to breathe and feel fine while preparing for the end of the world as we know it." In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
1

13
ratings
Time:
17:23
More in
Nonprofits & Activism

0
Your rating: None