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Technically, 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of Street Fighter, the classic Capcom fighting game franchise that's made a comeback over the past few years. This weekend, however, Capcom has made "I Am Street Fighter," a 72-minute documentary film, available to stream free on YouTube. Originally only available as part of the $149.99 Street Fighter 25th Anniversary Collection, the film traces Street Fighter all the way back to its roots, through the glory days of the arcade, and finally to today's tournament scene, where pro players can make a name for themselves internationally.

Listen to directors and players of the original Street Fighter talk about the series' humble origins, see life-long fans share their stories, their art, and their collections of Street Fighter games, hear former Capcom community manager Seth Killian explain the game's intricacies, and see famous professional players Justin Wong and Daigo Umehara explain the epic conclusion of one of the most infamous showdowns in fighting game history.

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Capcom, like essentially all major Japanese game publishers these days, is making a major push into free-to-play titles. Deep Down, the company's big PlayStation 4 release, is a F2P role-playing game, a first for Capcom on consoles. It's a pretty bold experiment for the company, and one that producer Yoshinori Ono is prepared to face some criticism for.

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Resogun, the latest colorful shooter from Finnish indie developer Housemarque, is an extravagant, heavily detailed demonstration of the PlayStation 4's graphical horsepower. But look under the hood and you'll find an old shoot-'em-up that isn't shy of aping its inspirations.

If you remember losing quarters to the local arcade, you will recognize Resogun's Defender-like structure. As a spaceship, you protect humans from waves of enemies that encroach from both the left and right side of the screen. Resogun adds a twist: you must first "unlock" the humans by exterminating a special set of enemies before collecting the living cargo and delivering it to one of two goals.

It's just enough complexity to make the Defender homage feel new. In frantic moments, collecting humans off the ground and tossing them into their safety zone felt like delivering a slam dunk — not the first thing I associate with the retro shooter genre, but a welcome addition nonetheless.

The other inspiration is a lesser-known sub-genre called bullet hell, niche shooters in which hundreds, sometimes thousands of projectiles that inflict instant death gradually cover the screen. To survive, the player must memorize the intricate bullet patterns and carefully thread a craft through holes sometimes only a couple pixels wide.

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Midnight City, Majesco's indie publishing arm, is bringing racer Krautscape and brawler Double Dragon: Neon to Steam as well as Slender: The Arrival to consoles, the company announced today.

Krautscape and Double Dragon: Neon will be available for Windows PC while Slender: The Arrival will be published for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 through the Xbox Games Store and PlayStation Network. All three titles will cost $9.99 each and are slated to launch in the first quarter of this year.

Mario von Rickenbach's Krautscape is racing title in which players drive along tracks to collect points and take to the air to avoid obstacles. Each track is generated by the vehicle in the first place, building itself out as players drive so no two tracks are alike. The game also features a number of different modes, including a speed challenge mode.

Double Dragon: Neon is a reboot of the original 1987 classic side-scrolling beat em up. For the Windows PC version of the title, developer Abstraction has added a new online co-op mode that allows players to share health and power as well as revive each other.

The console versions of Slender: The Arrival will also include new content. Blue Isle Studios created two new levels that will "delve deeper into the lives of those Slender Man has touched." These new levels will tell the story of Slender Man's victims through flashbacks, putting players in their terrified shoes. Blue Isle also plans to release these two new levels as a free update for the PC version after their console launch.

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TV Gamer, July 1984 - It's not often you find gold in old game magazines, but man, this is absolutely fascinating. "How to play Adventures in the 1990s" by Richard Porch is a fever dream of what Arcades would be like in the decade coming up.

This was written in 1984 - directly in the middle of the American Video Game Crash (though written in the UK) and a few years after Tron happened and no idea on how Japan developers like Nintendo and Sega would change the world in a year or two. It's about how Arcades will evolve into giant Blade Runner style buildings where arcade games will be "modules" and essentially become the giant Vegas style casinos we see today.

It's an absolutely fascinating read to see what this guy thought would happen in the 90s, much like how Back to the Future expected 2015 to be pretty wild. It's so fascinating that I've transcribed the whole article here for easier reading.

I don't know where you are now, Richard Porch, but you're probably disappointed.

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(出典: l-oo)

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Original author: 
Cory Doctorow

Dr. Tom Murphy VII gave a research paper called "The First Level of Super Mario Bros. is Easy with Lexicographic Orderings and Time Travel . . . after that it gets a little tricky," (PDF) (source code) at SIGBOVIK 2013, in which he sets out a computational method for solving classic NES games. He devised two libraries for this: learnfun (learning fuction) and playfun (playing function). In this accompanying video, he chronicles the steps and missteps he took getting to a pretty clever destination.

learnfun & playfun: A general technique for automating NES games (via O'Reilly Radar)     

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