Skip navigation
Help

Bain Capital

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Romney_-_47_percent_large

On Wednesday night, the anonymous videographer behind the infamous "47 percent video" shot at a private Mitt Romney fundraiser in May 2012 revealed himself on MSNBC's The Ed Show. Scott Prouty was a bartender working high-end banquets in Boca Raton, Florida, including Romney's $50,000 per plate dinner. He is a registered independent who brought his Canon camera with him in case Mitt Romney wanted to meet and take photos with the staff, as Bill Clinton had after a similar event. No one had told the staff not to bring cameras or take photos. A Secret Service agent was some distance behind him. He set the camera down on the bar and pressed "record."

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

On Tuesday, Mitt Romney will conclude a nearly six-year campaign journey for the White House — and his supporters, as Christopher Morris’ latest photo essay reveals, could not be more earnest or more ready. The former Massachusetts Governor launched his first presidential bid in February 2007, and his second in June, 2011 — now the polls are tight and battleground states like Ohio, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Florida hang in the balance. Even though Hurricane Sandy disrupted the campaign flow in its final days, Republicans continue to hope that Romney’s earlier momentum and economic vision will win him the 270 electoral votes needed to take the oath of office in January.

Photojournalist Christopher Morris spent the last week of the campaign photographing Romney on the trail for TIME. He first photographed the Republican nominee back in the New Hampshire primary and has witnessed his journey to the upcoming finale. Last week he crisscrossed the country with the campaign, from Canton and Kettering, Ohio, to Tampa and Land O’Lakes, Fla.

Morris trains his lens on the voters rallying with great expectations to Romney’s side. Their anticipation and determination can almost be physically felt. Many politicos have summed this election up as two men and two parties with very different visions for America’s future, and Morris’ images capture just how deep this divide plunges. “I was a bit taken back by the strong division in the country, with a palpable disdain and hatred for President Obama by the crowds at the Romney events,” says Morris, who covered the George W. Bush’s two terms in the White House. “Having covered Gore, Kerry, Bush, and McCain, I’ve never quite seen it like this.”

Morris produced My America, a look at Republican nationalism in the country during George W. Bush’s terms. Later this month, Steidl will release Morris’ new book Americans, which further examines a nation in divide.

Christopher Morris is a contract photographer for TIME and is represented by VII

0
Your rating: None

Mitt Romney launched his fall campaign for the White House in a rousing Republican National Convention finale Thursday night, proclaiming America needs “jobs, lots of jobs” and promising to create 12 million of them in perilous economic times. “Now is the time to restore the promise of America,” Romney said in a prime-time speech to [...]

0
Your rating: None

Election Day is going to come quicker than you know.

Long the Republican frontrunner, Mitt Romney has been gradually building momentum towards Nov. 6 since clinching the party nomination on May 29. Now, in the throes of virtually non-stop tours around the U.S. with running mate Paul Ryan, Romney moves to the next stage of his campaign next Monday at the Republican National Convention in Tampa. 

Photographer Lauren Fleishman has watched Romney’s campaign evolve since she first began covering the former Massachusetts governor for TIME. Traveling with him through more than ten states since March, Fleishman became aware of how the Romney-Ryan team began to pull out the stops as the Republican National Convention loomed closer on the horizon.

This past week, as the Romney motorcade raced through Boston, New Orleans and Long Island, N.Y., TIME was granted some rare moments of behind-the-scenes access, as Fleishman tagged along with him at work on the campaign plane, and at a private luncheon with supporters.

(See more: Paul Ryan’s Life and Career in Photos)

The Romney camp, eager to reach crucial members of their party before the 2012 convention, had ratcheted up their game. Campaign events seemed grander; crowds swelled in front of more-energized-than-ever candidates. And, in as controlled an environment as the modern political campaign allows, Romney exuded a new spirit—that of Paul Ryan.

“Now that he has a running mate, the crowd gets really excited—it feels like almost twice the energy,” Fleishman said.

Lauren Fleishman is an award-winning photographer based in New York City. See her previous coverage of Romney on Super Tuesday here.

Related: The Rich History of Mitt Romney

0
Your rating: None

kevin o'connor

This is a guest post from Kevin O'Connor, founder of DoubleClick, and currently CEO and founder of FindTheBest.

As an entrepreneur, turned VC, turned entrepreneur, I’m constantly asked how good ideas come about, how to start a business and take it to its full potential and what to focus on and what to ignore when running a company.  After founding or co-founding several companies, including the Intercomputer Communications Corporation, DoubleClick and now, FindTheBest—a data-driven comparison engine—I’ve come up with 10 key tips for young entrepreneurs.

1. Look for a big problem

Find a big problem that addresses a large audience or market and then come up with the best solution. Don’t get caught up in temporary fads that will come and go; think long term. Figure out what problems you and your peers have come a crossed and find the best solution.

2. Distinguish between fads and trends

Oftentimes people mistake fads for trends. While a trend is a behavior that grows into a permanent change, a fad is something that grows quickly in popularity but eventually fades away. (Think the pet rock vs. social media.) Make sure that whatever new idea you come up with sets or follows a growing trend.

3. Look for disjoints

New technology trends cause disjoints, which in turn open up space for new inventions. Think about how the smartphone has opened up space for the App market or how social media companies like Facebook have opened up a space for online social gaming or broad-scale photo sharing.

4. Innovate constantly

Great entrepreneurs are seldom satisfied inventing just one successful product—they’re constantly innovating and looking for ways to solve the big problems around them.  Success is oftentimes a numbers game; you need to come up with a lot of bad ideas before you come up with the great idea, so be persistent and don’t give up.

5. Test and scale

At FindTheBest, we’re constantly testing new ideas and products. We never launch anything unless it has been through several rounds of testing. But even after throughout testing, there’s the question of scale. If a new idea isn’t scalable, you’re probably better off scrapping it and looking for something that is scalable.

6. Stand firmly behind your convictions

As an entrepreneur, you need to believe in your ideas with such conviction because no matter what your idea or vision, there will be skeptics.  I remember when I first heard about a company that wanted to bring the idea of a flea market to the Web; I thought it was the worst idea.  A few years later, eBay—a multi-billion dollar company—was born.

7. Know when to pivot

As an entrepreneur, you need to be willing to fail—so long as you fail quickly. The sooner you come to that conclusion, the sooner you can pivot or even completely scrap your idea and start on a new idea—drawing from all that you’ve learned from previous failures.

8. Focus on your customers, not your competitors

Many companies focus too much on the competition rather than on their customers.  When you’re focusing on what you’re competitor is doing you: 1) Are already one step behind and 2) Take your focus off what really matters.

9. Always think about how you can destroy your own business

At DoubleClick, we were always thinking about how we could destroy our own business.  If you aren’t aware of what your weaknesses are and how your competition could take advantage of your weaknesses, your competitors will and they will destroy you. The most important thing is to serve the customers better than all the competition does.  Many companies make the mistake of focusing on the competition instead of on their customers.

10. Move

Successful entrepreneurs are quick movers because they realize that just having a multi-billion dollar idea doesn’t mean anything unless they get it out there before someone else does.

Kevin O’Connor, co-founder of DoubleClick, is the founder and CEO of FindTheBest, a data-driven comparison engine. He is also the author of the book, The Map of Innovation: Creating Something Out of Nothing.

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

0
Your rating: None

In the days leading up to yesterday’s Super Tuesday primary contests, Republican candidate Mitt Romney set his sights on Ohio, a swing state that has played a crucial role in recent presidential elections. Photographer Lauren Fleishman, who was photographing the candidate for TIME, did the same.

“I have been here before. It’s what I remember,” she says of the state, where she previously spent time working on an extensive personal project about the Amish. “The landscape still looks the same.” And, although the photographer was focused on a different kind of Ohioan this time around, she found that, while Romney was the star of the scene, the people of Ohio were still the highlight of the trip.

Photo opportunities with Romney were highly controlled—something that Justin Maxon, who was also photographing Super Tuesday for TIME, found to be equally true for Rick Santorum’s campaign. It was especially so after when Fleishman left her car to join the official campaign bus. The increase in access, the backstage passes, was paid for in limitations on where and when the photographer could stand and shoot. Taking those photographs was an artistic and technical challenge—how to make a good picture when you can’t get close enough?—but Fleishman found that the people who turned up to see the candidate were the real source of interest.

For example, at a factory in Canton, Ohio, on Monday, Fleishman turned her camera to the workers. “They were in their work outfits, which is just jumpers and construction hats, because they went to work on a Monday and a lot of them, I was told, didn’t even know that there was going to be something going on,” she says. “For me the most exciting thing is getting to see the people from each town come out, and to speak to them and to see their faces.”

From Dayton to Youngstown, each town had its own character—and each town had its own characters. Each campaign event presented the photographer with one group of people that made up one piece of Ohio. As the campaign bus traveled through the state, the photographer was able to put those pieces together, many portraits of people becoming a portrait of a state. And yesterday, anticipating leaving the state to join Romney as he waited for the day’s results in Boston, Fleishman hoped that her photographs from Ohio would show the state itself as a part of a larger puzzle.

“You get these little glimpses into different towns,” she says. “I want the photographs in some way to show a portrait of America through the candidate.”

Lauren Fleishman is an award-winning photographer based in New York City. See more of her work here and her last post on LightBox here

0
Your rating: None

Spanish photographer Ricardo Cases is known for his signature bright colors—colors that were on vivid display in his most recent book, Paloma Al Aire, which captures the traditions of pigeon racing. This week, TIME asked Cases to turn his eye to a different kind of sport: politics.

The photographer traveled to Florida to cover Tuesday’s Republican presidential primary, which Mitt Romney easily won. Although Cases had never photographed American politics before, he said he found the atmosphere one that was well suited for his photographic process.

“Florida has everything I need to work: color, color, color, good weather and all the consequences of these four factors in the development of the society,” he said in an email to TIME.

Cases was not very familiar with the topic he was sent to shoot, but he didn’t need to do much preparation to capture these vibrant images of candidate former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and the voters he hoped to persuade, as well as events for Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum. In fact, Cases said he rarely does much preparation for a shoot, preferring to rely on randomness as a catalyst for his pictures. “What stimulates me is the freshness of the first encounter with a new place, with a new people,” he said. “I think that chance is a great tool for a photographer.”

And now that he’s experienced that moment with birds and politicians alike, what’s his take-away for the future?

“It’s easier to work with politicians,” he said, “because they can’t fly.”

Ricardo Cases is a Spanish photographer. See more of his work here.

Interview with Ricardo Cases translated by Javier Sirvent.

0
Your rating: None

Fireworks explode in the sky over Bucharest, Romania, at midnight, Sunday, Jan. 1, 2012, during street celebrations of the new year. Large crowds gathered around the word to bring in 2012. Los Angeles Fire Department firefighters assist a man out of his apartment along with a cage of birds as multiple cars burn in a [...]

0
Your rating: None