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933924 512868958750541 697525497 n First official Brain Computer Interface journal coming in January 2014

At last, there will be a printed journal where BCI researchers can submit their work to. It is called the Brain-Computer Interfaces published by Taylor & Francis, an international company originating in the UK that publishes books and academic journals. The BCI journal was announced and its importance was discussed at the recent BCI meeting at Pacific Grove, California.

The new BCI journal will have four issues a year. The first issue is planned to be published in January 2014.

The journal will focus on the following areas:

  • Development and user-centered evaluation of engineered BCI applications with emphasis on the analysis of what aspects are crucial to making the system work, in addition to straightforward assessment of its success.
  • Scientific investigation of patterns of brain activity that can, or show promise to be able to, be used to drive BCI applications.
  • Development and evaluation of signal processing methods that extract signal features, classify them, and otherwise translate brain signals into device commands.
  • New invasive and noninvasive methods to monitor and acquire brain signals.
  • Applications of BCI technology to understand human perception, affect, action, and various aspects of cognition and behavior.
  • Ethical and sociological implications of brain-computer interfacing applications.
  • Human factors and human-computer interaction (HCI) concerns in the design, development and evaluation of BCIs.
  • Clinical trials and individual case studies of the experimental therapeutic application of BCIs.
  • Behavioral studies of BCI use in humans and animals.
  • Studies of neurosurgical techniques relevant to BCIs.
  • Proposal, review and analysis of standards for BCI hardware, software and protocols.

The new printed journal is clearly a great opportunity for the whole BCI community to get together and have a more organized publication standard. The contribution towards this journal will help the BCI community to find other researchers for collaboration more easily.

If you would like to have your paper for consideration, contact the co-editors Chang Nam and Jeremy Hill.

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Numerous tents are seen during the 2013 International Camping Festival on Mount Wugongshan in Pingxiang, Jiangxi province, China. The event attracted more than 15,000 campers from all over the world, according to Xinhua News Agency.

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Time once more for a look at the animal kingdom and our interactions with the countless species that share our planet. Today's photos include Iranian dog owners under pressure, a bloom of mayflies, Kim Jong-un visiting Breeding Station No. 621, animals fleeing recent fires and floods, and a dachshund receiving acupuncture therapy. These images and many others are part of this roundup of animals in the news from recent weeks, seen from the perspectives of their human observers, companions, captors, and caretakers, part of an ongoing series on animals in the news. [38 photos]

James Hyslop, a Scientific Specialist at Christie's auction house holds a complete sub-fossilised elephant bird egg on March 27, 2013 in London, England. The massive egg, from the now-extinct elephant bird sold for $101,813 at Christie's "Travel, Science and Natural History" sale, on April 24, 2013 in London. Elephant birds were wiped out several hundred years ago. The egg, laid on the island of Madagascar, is believed to date back before the 17th century. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)     

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boesing

sutrs

“The first joint of a little finger can be sliced easily,” he said. “You tie the bottom of it with thread tightly and put your body weight on a kitchen knife. But the second joint was tougher than I thought.” Luckily, there was a brother to hand, who could stand on the knife and slice through the knuckle. The loss of the tip of the pinkie on his right hand was his own fault — he got drunk and started throwing furniture around in a bar. Unfortunately for him, the bar belonged to a friend of his boss. Out came the kitchen knife again, and off came the top of his little finger. But his fourth amputation bore a whole different significance.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/06/13/fake-fingers-help-ex-yakuza-lead-l...

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Soulskill

vinces99 writes "Small electrodes placed on or inside the brain allow patients to interact with computers or control robotic limbs simply by thinking about how to execute those actions. This technology could improve communication and daily life for a person who is paralyzed or has lost the ability to speak from a stroke or neurodegenerative disease. Now researchers have demonstrated that when humans use this brain-computer interface, the brain behaves much like it does when completing simple motor skills such as kicking a ball, typing or waving a hand (abstract). That means learning to control a robotic arm or a prosthetic limb could become second nature for people who are paralyzed."

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Unknown Lamer

ananyo writes "A toy quadcopter can be steered through an obstacle course by thought alone. The aircraft's pilot operates it remotely using a cap of electrodes to detect brainwaves that are translated into commands. Ultimately, the developers of the mind-controlled copter hope to adapt their technology for directing artificial robotic limbs and other medical devices." From the paper (PDF) abstract: "... we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional (3D) physical space using noninvasive scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that the operation of a real world device has on subjects’ control in comparison to a 2D virtual cursor task. Approach. ... Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while traveling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m s^(1)." This also appears to be the first time a Brain-Computer Interface was used to operate a flying device in 3D space. Also, there are several additional videos showing people operating the quadcopter.

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Andrew Webster

Ats_kickstarter_screen_01_large

Helplessness is a key to good horror, and there are few times when you're more helpless than as a child. Among the Sleep, an upcoming game that just launched a Kickstarter campaign, aims to exploit that fact by putting you in the role of a two-year-old. You'll stumble through a dark house in search of your parents, seeing the world from a first-person perspective — and one that's much lower to the ground. You'll also have to deal with the added terrors created by a child's overactive imagination.

"There are at least two times in everyone's lives when we have been authentically scared: and that's while we are dreaming and when we were children," explains Adrian Tingstad Husby, from development studio Krillbite. "Among the Sleep...

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WIRED UK


Sunrise over a wheat field.

The Knowles Gallery

Researchers have managed to turn indigestible cellulose into starch, a process that could render billions of tons of agricultural waste into food and fuel.

Plants grow more than 160 billion tons of cellulose—the material that makes up the walls of plant cells—every year, but only a tiny fraction of that is useful to humans in the crops we grow. This is frustrating, as cellulose is made up of glucose chains that are almost, but not quite, the same as those that make up the starch that constitutes 20 to 40 percent of most peoples' daily calorie intake.

With the world's population forecast to reach nine billion by 2050, working out how to alter cellulose glucose into something more practical could be vital for preventing starvation. There's also an extra benefit in that some could be used for biofuels.

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