Skip navigation
Help

Blogs

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.



<iframe width="600" height="338" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/IcrBqCFLHIY?showinfo=0&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

[Video Link] This is a good six-minute video that explains how transistors work. I liked the description of N- and P-type doping. (Via Adafruit)

0
Your rating: None



<iframe width="600" height="338" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GNZBSZD16cY?showinfo=0&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Beatboxer extraordinaire Tom Thum performs at TEDxSydney. I'd love to see a duet of Thum and Michael Winslow of Police Academy fame, seen in the video below

0
Your rating: None

sciencehabit writes "A new study suggests that all the reviews you read on Yelp and Amazon are easily manipulated. It's not that companies are stacking the deck, necessarily, it's that a few positive comments early on can influence future commenters. In fact, when researchers gamed the system on a real news aggregation site, the items received fake positive votes from the researchers were 32% more likely to receive more positive votes compared with a control (abstract). And those comments were no more likely than the control to be down-voted by the next viewer to see them. By the end of the study, positively manipulated comments got an overall boost of about 25%. However, the same did not hold true for negative manipulation. The ratings of comments that got a fake down vote were usually negated by an up vote by the next user to see them."

0
Your rating: None

Joshua Katz, at NC State University's Department of Statistics, compiled a series of simple, striking maps that visualize the words Americans use—and where they use them. The data was compiled from a survey conducted by Bert Vaux at the University of Cambridge. Below are just a few to whet your appetite for the full set of 122.

0
Your rating: None



<iframe width="600" height="450" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7k2HONn7AQw?showinfo=0&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Edgar Camago, aka DJ Overeasy, did an amazing Breaking Bad remix video we featured recently on Boing Boing. Edgar also teaches third grade at a school in San Francisco.

"My class recently created a song using nothing but objects and sounds found in the classroom or in school," Edgar says. And here's the resulting video.

"Any money made off of YouTube will be donated to my school," Edgar says.

He's on Facebook, and YouTube.

More about the video, below.

0
Your rating: None

Link, the green-clad protagonist of Nintendo's Zelda series, is usually portrayed as a boy. A couple of games, however, feature him as a grown-up. Nintendo concept artist Katsuya Terada, however, also sketched a mature--even elderly--hero. These designs, along with fantastic watercolors of a more familiar young adult link, were made public in a long-out of print art book. Enjoy the flickr set: it might not stay up long!

Katsuya Terada Zelda Art [History of Hyrule via Kotaku]

0
Your rating: None


Here's the slide deck [PDF] from a Michael Dearing presentation called "The Five Cognitive Distortions of People Who Get Stuff Done." As Kottke points out, a lot of context is missing, but what's there is fascinating -- an enumeration of the blind spots of "people who get extraordinary stuff done in Silicon Valley," based on interviews with 4,515 founders from 2,481 companies.

1. Personal exceptionalism
2. Dichotomous thinking
3. Correct overgeneralization
4. Blank canvas thinking
5. Schumpeterianism

The Five Cognitive Distortions of People Who Get Stuff Done [PDF]

0
Your rating: None


Don't miss Boing Boing's video interview with Dr. Donna J. Nelson, science advisor to the television series "Breaking Bad." The show's final episode airs this coming Sunday night on AMC. PBS science correspondent Miles O'Brien and I interviewed her in 2012, when she and the Breaking Bad cast and creator Vince Gilligan were at Comic-Con in San Diego.

0
Your rating: None

jcatcw writes "A recent study shows that a single random up-vote, randomly chosen, created a herding behavior in ratings that resulted in a 25% increase in the ratings but the negative manipulation had no effect. An intuitive explanation for this asymmetry is that we tend to go along with the positive opinions of others, but we tend to be skeptical of the negative opinions of others, and so we go in and correct what we think is an injustice. The third major result was that these effects varied by topic. So in business and society, culture, politics, we found substantial susceptibility to positive herding, whereas in general news, economics, IT, we found no such herding effects in the positive or negative direction."

0
Your rating: None



<iframe width="600" height="450" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jo-uuawy9Ok?showinfo=0&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Yacht Club Games' Shovel Knight reminds me of so many different games I think I'll have to play them all through again before it comes out this winter. $15 preorders are open.

0
Your rating: None