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Bruce Gilden

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Bruce Gilden’s photo series about foreclosed homes, which will be presented this weekend by the Magnum Foundation as part of the Photoville 2012 festival, is a departure from the photographer’s usual working style—and not just because this exhibition is going to be held in a shipping container.

“It’s the only piece I’ve ever done that could be considered photojournalistic, because I work generally like a poet,” Gilden says, meaning that he went into the project with a point of view rather than just looking for people or things that caught his eye. “I take pictures of what I feel, but this is a direct thing: I’m going to photograph houses that are foreclosed.”

Gilden got started on the topic in 2008, as part of a Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund effort to revisit a 1960s project; the idea was that President Obama might present a parallel to President Kennedy, and that it was a good time to look at the state of the country. Gilden intended to go to Florida and photograph the people of Miami Beach, but his wife suggested that foreclosures might be a more appropriate subject. “I didn’t even know really what foreclosure was,” he remembers. “But I went down and did foreclosures, and as I started to do it I started to get annoyed, because I saw it’s like legalized thievery.”He subsequently began to study up on the topic—he says he has now read 20 books on the topic, throws around words like “tranche” and can cite foreclosure rates by state—and the annoyance turned to anger. That anger became the message of the photographs. “I’m not on the one-percent side,” he says.

Video about the project from Gilden’s Kickstarter page

Some people do take advantage of the mortgage crisis as a scam, he says, but mostly it’s the bankers who he sees benefitting. “This just showed me how people in our country get used and abused,” he says. He cites one woman he met in Las Vegas, who earned $40,000 a year and received a $360,000 mortgage; “I mean, you must be kidding me,” he says. He admits that it’s not smart to take such an offer, but in a scenario where banks can get rid of bad mortgages rather than suffering from them, he sees incentive for those in power to convince individuals to take loans they can’t handle.

In the time since Gilden began photographing foreclosed houses, he says the problem has gotten worse. The original photographs of Florida have expanded to include several other states, including Nevada, which he recently visited on a Kickstarter-funded trip. The people he’s met along the way, people who feel taken advantage of, are eager to tell their stories in the interviews he conducts along with his photography. But he says he doesn’t plan to work on this series indefinitely. Next, he’d like to capture the step that sometimes follows foreclosure, life as a long-term resident of a motel. And he doesn’t see improvement coming any time soon: if the people capable of changing the situation benefit from the status quo, he says, why would they ever make those changes?

So even though this recent work is a departure from Gilden’s typical style and process, his interest is consistent when it comes to what he calls the dark side of life. “It’s great to wake up every morning because the world is great,” he says, “but it’s not a wonderful place for everyone.”

More information about Bruce Gilden’s No Place Like Home is available here, through the Magnum Foundation. The Photoville exhibition will be shown June 22 – July 1 in Brooklyn, New York; more information about the festival is available here.

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Bright red telephone boxes, afternoon tea, bobbies with batons. Today even the most naive tourist knows this Mary Poppins vision of Britain is about as true to life as Dick Van Dyke’s cockney accent. But what, then, does it mean to be British in 2012? That’s a question the London Festival of Photography has tried to answer with its headline show, “The Great British Public.” The exhibition brings together 13 photographers who have captured modern British life, from posh wingdings to a wind-lashed laundry day on Scotland’s Orkney Islands. “We wanted to celebrate Britain more than be depressed about it,” says curator Grace Pattison, noting her countrymen’s talent for grousing. “It’s about the quirkiness, irony, the humor of the British. It’s quite an uplifting show, really.”

Nothing jars more with the British sensibility than the idea of forced positivity. Yet Pattison is savvy enough to have built a ‘warts-and-all’ show that winks at its subject while patting it on the back. Some of the photographers have taken on traditions that still thrive in parts of the country. Chris Steele-Perkins captures the lives of the increasing number of Brits who live to be 100 and receive a congratulatory birthday card from the Queen. Arnhel de Serra (the only non-Brit in the show) has captured the action at countryside agricultural shows, where elderly ladies in tweed vie for top prizes in jam-making and flower arranging. Giulietta Verdon-Roe presents a different glimpse into rural life with her elegiac images of the northernmost Orkney Island, population 51 (plus a few thousand seaweed-eating sheep and one very tall lighthouse).

Other photographers focus on the new traditions being created. Photographer Ewen Spencer followed the rise of the Grime music scene (epitomized by black artist Dizzee Rascal), and the young people who hope to rap their way out of London’s poorest neighborhoods.

And then, of course, there is Britain’s ethnic diversity, often packed into small areas like the borough of Hackney in London, documented by Zed Nelson, or a street in the northern city of Birmingham, photographed by Liz Hingley, which hosts over 30 different places of worship including a mosque and a Hindu temple.

It’s impossible to talk about British photography without mentioning Martin Parr, whose seminal The Last Resort: Photographs of New Brighton (1982-86) presented working class holiday-makers—they of the bulging, pink flesh and oily fish and chip wrappers—in all their vulgar glory. For the exhibition, Pattison preferred not to dwell on Parr’s 80s oeuvre (“It’s not the most exciting way to talk about Britain anymore.”). Rather, she chose an homage to Parr in the work of Peter Dench, who returned to the parts of New Brighton featured in The Last Resort and photographed them as they are today. Even now, the northern town near Liverpool provokes wry bemusement among the British: “It’s all quite gray and the scenery isn’t that exciting,” says Pattison. “It’s seaside life, but with a quite humorous look.”

One image of Parr’s does appear in the exhibition: a picture of an English bobby, standing in a red-brick town, hands on hips, while children hula hoop in the street. “At first glance, you think, ah, it’s a really traditional English scene,” says Pattison. “But it’s actually a historic museum in the Black Country [the industrial Midlands]. It’s actually just a mock street and he’s an actor dressed up as a policeman.”

Finally, the exhibition touches on the British at play, whether it be country and seaside escapes (Simon Roberts), a barbershop in London where locals hash out the day’s politics (Nick Cunard) or the beer-swilling excesses of English football fans (Homer Sykes).

Even with such a multifarious show, Pattison is worried the British public in question will find something to quibble about. “By calling it ‘The Great British Public’ we are potentially asking for criticism if people don’t feel like their view of Britain is in there,” she says. But in the year of the London Olympics and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations, Pattison is allowing herself to be Britishly optimistic. “Hopefully not too many people will say that,” she says with a laugh.

The London Festival of Photography’s exhibition The Great British Public will be on view from June 1 through June 24. More information is available here.

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Clichés are tricky things. They convey a kind of truth — but can ring hollow. They can sound profound — but once uttered, they’re utterly forgettable. And while often employed to pay tribute to an individual, or to describe a specific profession, some clichés can be applied to a litany of vocations.

When other people run away from danger, they run toward it. They go into battle armed with nothing but courage. Like everyone else, they experience fear — but unlike everyone else, they keep going.

Ultimately, though, there’s one especially odd, defining characteristic about clichés: they endure for a reason. And while some of the assertions above — about running toward danger or experiencing fear — could easily pertain to any number of pursuits, from firefighting to mountain climbing, very few occupations in the world can make those platitudes sound new and meaningful again quite like the job of war photographer.

Ralph Morse—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Here, in a short film by Will Wedig, Jonah Weintraub and Bill Shapiro — made to honor recipients of Time Inc’s prestigious Briton Hadden Lifetime Achievement Award — the profession and the passion of war photography, as practiced across decades by acknowledged masters, get their due.

One of the honorees, LIFE’s Ralph Morse, was sent to the Pacific in World War II as the youngest war correspondent working in that theater. All he managed to accomplish during the conflict was to survive the sinking of a cruiser off of Guadalcanal; make dozens of the most celebrated (and shocking) pictures to come out of the global conflagration; chronicle the liberation of Paris in 1944; and record the German surrender to Eisenhower in 1945. (Morse went on to so devotedly and inventively cover the early days of the Mercury Seven and the Space Race that John Glenn dubbed him the “eighth astronaut,” while LIFE’s long-time managing editor George Hunt once declared that “if LIFE could afford only one photographer, it would have to be Ralph Morse.”)

Larry Burrows—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

The late, British-born Larry Burrows distinguished himself covering Southeast Asia from 1962 until his death in 1971. His work, from the searing single image, “Reaching Out” (featuring a wounded Marine desperately trying to comfort a stricken comrade after a fierce 1966 firefight in a landscape that might have given Hieronymus Bosch nightmares) to his great photo essay, “One Ride With Yankee Papa 13,” not only captured the war in Vietnam. For millions of people around the world, Burrows’ pictures encompassed and defined the long, divisive catastrophe.

He and three fellow photojournalists died when their helicopter was shot down during operations in Laos. Larry Burrows was 44.

James Nachtwey for TIME

Finally, there’s James Nachtwey, who has covered civil strife, natural disasters and armed conflicts around the globe for more than three decades. He has seen fellow photographers and friends injured and killed while doing their jobs. He has been wounded himself (in Iraq in 2003, when an insurgent tossed a grenade into a Humvee that he and TIME’s Michael Weisskopf were riding in). He was the subject of the 2001 Oscar-nominated documentary, War Photographer, and is widely regarded as the greatest living photojournalist.

“To see life,” Henry Luce wrote in his now-famous 1936 mission statement for LIFE magazine, delineating what he envisioned as his new venture’s workmanlike method and its lofty aims. “To see the world; to eyewitness great events … to see strange things — machines, armies, multitudes … to see and be amazed; to see and be instructed.”

Across decades, Morse, Burrows and Nachtwey have seen, and have helped us see, the very best and the absolute worst that humanity can offer.

When other people ran from danger, they ran toward it. They went into battle armed with nothing but courage. They experienced fear — and they kept going. These are war photographers.

Ben Cosgrove is the editor of LIFE.com.

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On April 24, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg released a digital trove of 870,000 photographs, maps and videos that document more than 150 years of Big Apple history, starting in 1858. Among the highlights is a series of images showcasing the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, which opened to the public 129 years ago on Thursday.

The evocative, black-and-white photographs are not only remarkable for the intimate and playful details they capture, including a shot of workers painting the Brooklyn Bridge in 1914—without harness!—but also because they were taken by an amateur photographer named Eugene de Salignac, who was a municipal worker from 1906-1934.

Eugene de Salignac

Under the bridge on the Brooklyn side, 1918.

“He was an extremely talented photographer who was tasked with documenting the building of the city,” says Eileen Flannelly, New York City’s deputy commissioner for the department of records. “Unfortunately, he didn’t get recognition for his images during his lifetime. He was just a civil service employee, really unknown. I don’t think people really understood then that he was showing us how our city was built.”

The push to unveil this digital archive has been in the works for nearly four years, and it’s likely to become a hallmark achievement for Mayor Bloomberg, who has made it a mission to support technological initiatives during his tenure. Other photographs from the archive give viewers an inside look at the city’s grisly crime scenes, old Times Square and various borough presidents’ offices. “I look at the crime scene and it’s like looking at an old gangster movies—they’re fascinating because they don’t look real,” Flannelly says. “Then I look at pictures from the ‘80s and see how much the city has changed. It’s fascinating because you don’t have to go too far back to see how far we’ve come.”

The New York City Municipal Archives Photo Gallery can be browsed online here.

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Three people—Jeanie, 82, Will, 84, and Adina, 90—are bound together in a relationship, a love triangle of sorts, a three-way connection that they rely on to shield them from the pains of loneliness and the fear of aging. Every day the trio meets near their senior-care facilities (each lives at a different location) to spend their remaining days together. Will picks up Jeanie at her care center, greeting her with a long kiss, and the two head hand-in-hand to collect Adina for whatever the day may bring.

Recently, that includes Isadora Kosofsky, who, after the death of the maternal grandmother who raised her, began to search for catharsis through photography. “Grief following my grandmother’s death unconsciously led me to photograph the lives and relationships of the elderly,” Kosofsky says.

The trio’s relationship clearly challenges cultural norms. Will, describing the trio’s bond to Kosofsky, said, “We live above the law. Not outside the law, but above the law. We are not outlaws.” Will, Jeanie and Adina are connected by more than time and space. “There are many different kinds of love,” Adina told Kosofsky. Their relationship, like all relationships, can be frustrating for all three. Jeanie once confided in Kosofsky that “to share Will is a thorn in your side…A relationship between a man and a woman is private. It’s a couple, not a trio.” But despite Jeanie’s misgivings, she must share Will with Adina and Adina must share Will with her.

Kosofsky met Jeanie, Will and Adina three short years after picking up a camera. “I befriended the group because I recognize a part of me in both Jeanie and Adina. Will, too, is familiar to me… a reflection of men I have known,” she says. “When I share in their lives, I am reminded of my adolescence.”

Kosofsky herself is not that far removed from adolescence. She is 18 years old and is now a documentary photographer based in Los Angeles—finding inspiration from photographers like Jane Evelyn Atwood, who spent years documenting one subject. Kosofsky believes long-term projects offer the opportunity of deeper and more poignant storytelling. In her own projects, it is her goal to “devote myself to living amongst my subjects as an occupant, rather than a visitor.”

“The aged are becoming increasingly hidden and disenfranchised. I noticed that even towards the end of my grandmother’s life, she appeared distant from society,” Kosofsky says. The photographer is currently engaged in photographing a three-part series on aging—a subject about which she is passionate. “I feel that age is a perceived barrier and that we too have once, either literally or figuratively, shared their fear of isolation and their wish for acknowledgement,” she explains. “Even when Jeanie and Adina are not present, Will walks with his right hand straight and open at his side, as if he were waiting for someone to hold on.”

Isadora Kosofsky is a Los Angeles-based documentary photographer. More of her work can be seen here.

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Bruce Gilden first traveled to Haiti in 1984 and made 19 trips over the course of 10 years. In 2011, he photographed the temporary structures in Port-au-Prince in digital and in color for the first time.

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In October 2010 I completed the last leg of my work in Fresno, California. California has one of the highest rates of foreclosure in the United Sates and 21.7 percent of all the riskiest loans. Here, the housing prices peaked in early 2005 and started to decline in 2006.

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We’re still in Libya…

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: Libyans Flood Tunisia’s Border Zone (Newsweek: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Christopher Morris: Muammar Gaddafi’s Tripoli (TIME: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Moises Saman: Libyan Crisis (Magnum: March 2011)

NYT’s Libya gallery updated with photos from yesterday

Earlier today, I was reading March 14 issue of TIME with a lot of Yuri Kozyrev’s photos from Libya and Yemen…

See Kozyrev’s updated Libya gallery on Time’s website here.

His Yemen work..It was interesting to compare the photos online and in print…Something I noticed regarding these Yemen ones, was that the frames in print didn’t look half as punchy as online…Love the toning…

Features and Essays – Yuri Kozyrev: On the Ground in Yemen (TIME: February 2011)

Emphas.is has launched..

Crowdfunding - Emphas.is

Articles – NYT: Financing Photojournalism by Subscription (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen’s ViaPanAm is one of the Emphas.is projects…

Features and Essays - Kadir van Lohuizen:  ViaPanAm (Project website: 2011)

Features and Essays - Graeme Robertson: Guatemalan street children (Guardian: March 2011)

I seem to recall that Boston Globe’s Big Picture has been doing several of these monthly round-ups of Afghanistan in the past… these are from February…

Features and Essays – Boston Globe: Afghanistan February 2011 (Boston Globe Big Picture: March 2011)

Speaking of Afghanistan, I just started reading Sebastian Junger’s War… First 30 pages really sucked me in…

Features and Essays – Steve Davis: Elegy for a Small Idaho Town (NYT Lens: March 2011) Davis’ website

Bruce Haley on NYT Lens and New Yorker Photo Booth…

Features and Essays - Bruce Haley: Rebuilding Lives in Former Soviet Lands (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Bruce Haley: Postcard from Nagorno-Karabakh and beyond (New Yorker: March 2011)

Haley’s website

Features and Essays - Mark Ovaska: The Search For Glacier Gold (NPR: March 2011)

Talent calls…

AgenciesMagnum Photos issues annual submission call (BJP: March 2011)

MagazinesFOAM Magazine Talent Call

Loads of interviews…

Interviews - Bruce Gilden (BJP: March 2011) Exclusive video: Bruce Gilden goes “head on” in Derby

Interviews - Stanley Greene (Youtube)

Interviews - Steve McCurry (Pro Photographers in Ireland Vimeo: 2011)

Interviews - Brent Lewin (Msnbc.com: March 2011)

Interviews - Nina Berman (APE: March 2011)

InterviewsNick Turpin on street photography’s challenges (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews Michael Wolf welcomes World Press Photo controversy (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews - Lu Guang (Greenpeace Vimeo)

Magnum Foundation has a new website…

AgenciesMagnum Foundation

Articles - BBC: Right Here, Right Now: At the Format Festival in Derby (BBC: March 2011)

Back in time…

Articles - NYT: Tom Waits and Robert Frank, New York City, 1985 (NYT Magazine: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian: The big picture: Whitechapel 1972 (Guardian: March 2011)Ian Berry’s photograph, commissioned by the Whitechapel Gallery, captures a key moment of change in an area long used to a shifting population

PhotographersTodd Bigelow

Veronica got herself a new website…

Photographers - Veronica Sanchis Bencomo

Photographers - Nick Ballon

PhotographersAnnemarie Scholz

PhotographersNicole Tung

Copyright issues…

Articles - BJP: Photographers’ Gallery finds itself at centre of copyright row (BJP: March 2011)

Articles – Jeremy Nicholl: Dear Photographers, Lady Gaga Wants The Copyright On Your Work. Oh, And By The Way, So Do We (photographer’s blog: March 2011)

VideosSimon  Roberts uploaded  new 120 Seconds short films from the last couple of weeks (Simon Roberts Vimeo: March 2011)

Articles - Verve: Boris Heger (Verve: March 2011)

Workshops - Very affordable workshop with Joseph Rodriquez in Cardiff 21-24 March, organised by Third Floor Gallery

Exhibitions and BooksThe month in photography (Guardian: March 2011) The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books

Resources - LinkedIn …. I’ve had a LinkedIn profile for about a year, but I never got around to finishing my profile and adding contacts until recently…and I’ve noticed that not only is the site good for virtual networking with colleagues I know, but also with ones I don’t. I’ve managed for instance to find names of loads of  photo editors at different newspapers and magazines through my Linked In contacts, which is pretty useful (There is of course Agency Access but you have to pay for that)…and I guess that’s what the whole linking-in is about…

Speaking of LinkedIn… I noticed that VII Photo’s LinkedIn profile starts, maybe slightly peculiarly, with: “ The third most-important entity in photography”…as one might expect something more on the lines of, say ‘one of the most important entities in photography’…anyway…if VII are the third most important entity (finding the word entity a bit odd too), then I couldn’t help but thinking what are the two most important? Magnum Photos must one of the two for sure. The other? International Center of Photography was suggested on Twitter last night as were Getty…  Not trying to pick on VII here, of course…just food for funny thought.

About Twitter. I noticed I passed the 2,000 tweets mark yesterday. I got my profile on 19 January 2009, which based on my rough calculations means something like 2,6 tweets a day. The first ever tweet of mine? ”Loves Paolo Pellegrin’s DC piece at Magnum in Motion http://tinyurl.com/8n5q64” – @photojournalism

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