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The iPad may have started it, but the high resolution screen will soon be the norm. Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired.com

The rise of high-resolution screens means that web developers need resolution-independent graphics or images look blurry. For photographs responsive images may be the solution, but for simpler graphics like logos and icons there’s an easy solution that’s been with us for some time — Scalable Vector Graphics or SVG.

A slightly blurry icon or logo on a retina display probably isn’t going to drive your visitors away, but if it’s easy to fix and can potentially save you some bandwidth as well, why not?

Historically, browser support for SVG has not been particularly good, but these days SVG images work just about everywhere, except older versions of IE. Thankfully it isn’t hard to serve up regular old PNG files to older versions of IE while keeping the resolution-independent goodness for everyone else.

Developer David Bushell recently tackled the topic of SVG graphics in a very thorough post titled A Primer to Front-end SVG Hacking. Bushell covers using SVG graphics in image tags, stylesheets, sprites and even the old-school <object> method. He’s also got a great list of external resources, including SVGeezy for IE fallback, the SVG Optimizer for saving on bandwidth and grunticon which converts SVG files to PNG and data URIs for fallback images.

Head on over to Bushell’s site for more details and you can check out some of our previous posts on SVG for even more resources.

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A handful of the many screens your responsive designs must handle. Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired.com

Building responsive websites can be daunting. After all, instead of just one desktop layout you’re creating at least two, probably three or even four layouts to handle different breakpoints and screen sizes. That means considerably more work, which can feel overwhelming if you don’t have a good plan of attack.

One of the better plans I’ve seen recently comes from developer David Bushell, who recently outlines 5 Tips for Responsive Builds. Among his suggestions there are two standouts, the first being “utilize breakpoint zero.” For Bushell “breakpoint zero” just means “start by writing HTML in a semantic and hierarchical order. Start simple, with no CSS at all and then “apply the basic styles but don’t go beyond the default vertical flow.”

In other words, keep your layout slate blank as long as you can so that when you do start adding layout rules you can spot problems with different breakpoints early and fix them before changing things becomes a major headache.

The other highlight of Bushell’s post is the suggestion that you maintain a CSS pattern library — reusable snippets of CSS you can drop in for quick styling. There are a ton of ways you can do this, whether it’s something formal like SMACSS (pronounced “smacks”), OOCSS, or just taking the time to write a style guide with some sample code. The point isn’t how you do it or which method you use, but that you do it.

Be sure to check out Bushell’s post for more details on these two suggestions as well as the other three ways you can help make your responsive design process a bit smoother.

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