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Original author: 
Andrew Cunningham

So far this year's Google I/O has been very developer-centric—perhaps not surprising given that I/O is, at the end of the day, a developer's conference. Especially compared to last year's skydiving, Glass-revealing, Nexus-introducing keynote, yesterday's three-and-a-half-hour keynote presentation focused overwhelmingly on back-end technologies rather than concrete products aimed at consumers.

There's still plenty to see. All this year we've been taking photos to show you just what it's like to cover these shows—we've shown you things as large as CES and as small as Nvidia's GPU Technology Conference. Our pictures from the first day of Google I/O should give you some idea of what it's like to attend a developer conference for one of tech's most influential companies.


You are here

I/O is held in the west hall of the Moscone Center, and between the giant Google signs and this real-life Google Maps pin you'd be hard-pressed to miss it.

Andrew Cunningham

20 more images in gallery

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Chrome Mobile: The Mobile Web Developers Toolkit (Part 1)

Building for mobile web requires a different mindset than desktop web development, and a different set of tools. The tools we're used to using often aren't available or would take up too much screen real estate. And going back to the dark ages of tweak/save/deploy/test/repeat isn't exactly optimal, so what can we do? Thankfully there are a number of great options - from remote debugging to emulation, mobile browsers are offering more and more tools to make our lives easier. We'll take a look at a couple of tools that you can use today to make cross platform mobile web development easier and then peer into the crystal ball to see what tools may bring in the future. Join us for Part 1 - as we take a look at a few boiler plates, frameworks and helpful libraries for building the mobile web.
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The useless web

It's not new, it's not clever, but it is a great way to waste time. Welcome to The Useless Web, a curated collection of some of the world's most pointless websites. It's essentially a giant button that you can click to take you to one of many websites, some of which you'll know and love, and others that may be entirely new to you, but all sharing one common trait: they're useless.

We've been using the site all week long, and thought it was about time we shared some animated GIF/Flash love with you all. Check it out at the source below, and be sure to share your favorite useless site in comments.

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Facebook Login question marks

Since Wired writer Mat Honan was hacked earlier this year, he's taken a close look at security issues, leading him to question the ubiquitous concept of the password itself. Passwords, Honan explains, have been vulnerable for the thousands of years they've been in use, but the question remains, what can we replace them with? There's a careful balancing act between convenience, privacy, and security. In other words, people have to be able to access their own accounts without an immense amount of trouble, they have to feel like they have privacy when doing so, and the systems still need to remain secure. For an interesting discussion about the future of account security — and how to keep your accounts safe in the meantime — check out...

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Minority Report iconic head shot

A large part of what makes Steven Spielberg’s movies so memorable is the visuals, with Janusz Kaminski — Oscar-winner and long-time cinematographer for the director — talking to Vulture about how he achieved some of his iconic shots. Kaminski delves into his mindset during his filming of Spielberg's movies, describing the process on titles such as Schindler’s List, Minority Report, and the recently released Lincoln. Some are helped along with CGI — like The Lost World and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull — but it’s hard not to admire Kaminski’s skill after reading through his accounts.

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3D printed figure

3D printing can be used for everything from building parts for rocket ships to printing dinosaur bones, but a company in Japan will soon be using the technology for something a bit more ordinary: to replace the humble photo booth. A temporary pop-up booth will be launching at the Eye of Gyre exhibition in Japan on November 24th, and will be open until January 14th of next year. The idea is similar to a regular photo booth, only instead of receiving a string of photos, you'll get a miniature, action figure-style 3D model.

The models come in three sizes — ranging from 10 to 20 centimetres in height — and vary in price depending on how many people are in the shot, with the more expensive options costing upwards of ¥32,000 (about...

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Wikimedia | Star Trek LCARS UI

From the transparent touch screens of Minority Report to the LCARS operating system from Star Trek, there's no shortage of inventive user interface ideas to be found in science fiction. But for Nathan Shedroff and Christopher Noessel, these ideas are more than just a way to show off the latest special effects — they can also be a tool for those designing UIs in the present. In their book Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction, the two explore what lessons designers can take from interfaces found in sci-fi movies and TV. "Could it really work that way? Should it work that way?" they ask. "And, of course, can I get the interfaces I design in my own work to be this cool or even cooler?" You can check out the book for...

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Gagnam Style YouTube

It's hardly a surprise that viewership drops the longer it takes for a video to buffer, but a professor has analyzed data from 6.7 million unique visitors to try and put some numbers with the trend. According to a paper published by professor Ramesh K. Sitarman of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, viewers begin to abandon a video after a two second delay, with six percent disappearing per second thereafter. Depending on what kind of user you are, that may sound a bit low, but that may be due to the types of videos that Sitarman analyzed. The professor considered videos under 30 minutes long as "short" — we'd assume that your average minute-long YouTube video would lose far more users per second of buffering. As shown in the...

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Crashed Terminal

A 15-year-old hacker going by the name of Cosmo was sentenced by a California juvenile court to a probationary period until his 21st birthday, during which time he'll need approval from his parole officer to access the internet. Cosmo — also known as Cosmo the God — was profiled on Wired following the widely-publicized breach of editor Mat Honan's online accounts, though Cosmo had no connection to that particular hack. According to Wired, which received information about the case from Cosmo, the teenage hacker pled guilty to more than a few felonies, with charges ranging from credit card fraud to online impersonation. The probation that Cosmo agreed to as part of his plea limits his use of the internet to solely educational purposes,...

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Photo

In 1981, Disney animators introduced the world to the 12 basic principles of animation. For many, the 12 rules are held in the same esteem as Dieter Rams' ten principles of good design, and are seen as something of a bible to would-be animators. In a chapter in her book, The Mobile Frontier, Rachel Hinman looks at how the Disney principles can also be applied to mobile UI and game design, pulling in examples from Apple, Microsoft, Google, Palm, and more. Hinman believes that motion is all-important in mobile design, and highlights how transitive animations and other techniques can help bring a little "magic" into a mobile user experience. The full chapter has been published online by Smashing Magazine, while the book itself is available...

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