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I know you’ve been asked this plenty of times already, but: no new vendor prefixes, right? Right?

Nope, none! They’re great in theory but turns out they fail in practice, so we’re joining Mozilla and the W3C CSS WG and moving away them. There’s a few parts to this.

Firstly, we won’t be migrating the existing -webkit- prefixed properties to a -chrome- or -blink- prefix, that’d just make extra work for everyone. Secondly, we inherited some existing properties that are prefixed. Some, like -webkit-transform, are standards track and we work with the CSS WG to move ahead those standards while we fix any remaining issues in our implementation and we’ll unprefix them when they’re ready. Others, like -webkit-box-reflect are not standards track and we’ll bring them to standards bodies or responsibly deprecate these on a case-by-case basis. Lastly, we’re not introducing any new CSS properties behind a prefix.

Pinky swear?

Totes. New stuff will be available to experiment with behind a flag you can turn on in about:flags called “Experimental Web Platform Features”. When the feature is ready, it’ll graduate to Canary, and then follow its ~12 week path down through Dev Channel, Beta to all users at Stable.

The Blink prefix policy is documented and, in fact, WebKit just nailed down their prefix policy going forward. If you’re really into prefix drama (and who isn’t!) Chris Wilson and I discussed this a lot more on the Web Ahead podcast [37:20].

How long before we can try Blink out in Chrome?

Blink’s been in Chrome Canary as of the day we announced it. The codebase was 99.9% the same when Blink launched, so no need to rush out and check everything. All your sites should be pretty much the same.

Chrome 27 has the Blink engine, and that’s available on the beta channel for
Win, Mac, Linux, ChromeOS and Android. (See the full beta/stable/dev/canary
view
).

While the internals are apt to be fairly different, will there be any radical changes to the rendering side of things in the near future?

Nothing too alarming, layout and CSS stuff is all staying the same. Grid layout is still in development, though, and our Windows text rendering has been getting a new backend that we can hook up soon, greatly boosting the quality of webfont rendering there.

We’re also interested in better taking advantage of multiple cores on machines, so the more we can move painting, layout (aka reflow), and style recalculation to a separate thread, but the faster everyone’s sites will render. We’re already doing multi-threaded painting on ChromeOS and Android, and looking into doing it on Mac & Windows. If you’re interested in these experimental efforts or watching new feature proposals, take a look at the blink-dev mailing list. A recent proposed experiment is called Oilpan, where we’ll look into the advantages of moving the implementation of Chrome’s DOM into JavaScript.

Will features added to Blink be contributed back to the WebKit project? Short term; long term?

Since Blink launched there’s been a few patches that have been landed in both Blink and WebKit, though this is expected to decline in the long-term, as the code bases will diverge.

When are we likely to start seeing Blink-powered versions of Chrome on Android? Is it even possible on iOS, or is iOS Chrome still stuck with a Safari webview due to Apple’s policies?

Blink is now in the Chrome Beta for Android. Chrome for iOS, due to platform limitations, is based on the WebKit-based WebView that’s provided by iOS.

Part of this move seems to be giving Google the freedom to remove old or disused features that have been collecting dust in WebKit for ages. There must be a few things high on that list—what are some of those things, and how can we be certain their removal won’t lead to the occasional broken website?

A few old ’n crusty things that we’re looking at removing: the isindex attribute, RangeException, and XMLHttpRequestException. Old things that have little use in the wild and just haven’t gotten a spring cleaning from the web platform for ages.

Now, we don’t want to break the web, and that’s something that web browser engineers have always been kept very aware of. We carefully gauge real-world usage of things like CSS and DOM features before deprecating anything. At Google we have a copy of the web that we run queries against, so we have a pretty OK idea of what CSS and JavaScript out there is using.

Blink also has over 32,000 tests in its test suite, and manual confirmation that over 100 sites work great before every release ships. And we’re working closely with the W3C and Adobe to share tests and testing infrastructure across browsers, with the goals of reducing maintenance burden, improving interoperability, and increasing test coverage. Eventually we’d like all new features to ship with shared conformance tests, ensuring interoperability even as we add cutting-edge stuff.

Still, any deprecation has to be done responsibly. There’s now a draft Blink process for deprecating features which includes:

  • Anonymous metrics to understand how much any specific feature is used “in the wild”
  • ”Intent to deprecate” emails that hit blink-dev months before anything is
    removed
  • Warnings that you’ll find in your DevTools console if you’re using anything
    deprecated
  • Mentions on the Chromium blog like this Chrome 27
    wrap-up
    .

Did part of the decision to branch away from WebKit involve resistance to adding a Dart VM? WebKit’s goals explicitly mention JavaScript, and Apple representatives have been fairly vocal about not seeing a need.

Nope, not at all. The decision was made by the core web platform engineers. Introducing a new VM to a browser introduces considerable maintenance cost (we saw this with V8 and JavaScriptCore both in WebKit) and right now Dart isn’t yet ready to be considered for an integration with Blink. (more on that in a sec). Blink’s got strong principles around compatibility risk and this guides a lot of the decisions around our commitments to potential features as they are proposed. You can hear a more complete answer here from Darin Fisher, one of the Chrome web platform leads.

Have any non-WebKit browsers recently expressed an interest in Dart? A
scripting language that only stands to work in one browser sounds a little
VBScript-y.

Not yet, but since Dart compiles to JavaScript and runs across the modern web, it’s not gated by other browsers integrating the VM. But it’s still early days, Dart has not yet reached a stable 1.0 milestone and that there are still technical challenges with the Dart VM around performance and memory management. Still, It’s important to point out that Dart is an open source project, with a bunch of external contributors and committers.

Let me take a moment to provide my own perspective on Dart. :) Now, as you know, I’m a JavaScript guy, so early on, I took a side and and considered Dart an enemy. JavaScript should win; Dart is bad! But then I came to realize the Dart guys aren’t just setting out to improve the authoring and scalability of web application development. They also really want the web to win.  Now I’ve recently spoke about how The Mobile Web Is In Trouble, and clarified that my priorities are seeing it provide a fantastic user experience to everyone. For me, seeing the mobile web be successful trumps language wars and certainly quibbling over syntax. So I’m happy to see developers embrace the authoring advantages of Coffeescript, the smart subset of JavaScript strict mode, the legendary Emscripten & asm.js combo, the compiler feedback of TypeScript and the performance ambitions of Dart. It’s worth trying out technologies that can leapfrog the current expectations of the user experience that we can deliver. Our web is worth it.

Will Opera be using the Chromium version of Blink wholesale, as far as you know? Are we likely to see some divergence between Opera and Chrome?

As I understand it, Opera Mobile, Opera Desktop, and Opera Mini will all be based on Chromium. This means that they’ll not only share the exact version of Blink that Chrome uses, but also the same graphics stack, JavaScript engine, and networking stack. Already, Opera has contributed some great things to Blink and we’re excited about what’s next.

Why the name “Blink,” anyway?

Haha. Well… it’s a two parter. First, Blink evokes a certain feeling of speed and simplicity—two core principles of Chrome. Then, Chrome has a little tradition of slightly ironic names. Chrome itself is all about minimizing the browser chrome, and the Chromebook Pixel is all about not seeing any pixels at all. So naturally, it fits that Blink will never support the infamous <blink> tag. ;)

<3z

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Original author: 
Peter Bright

Aurich Lawson (with apologies to Bill Watterson)

Google announced today that it is forking the WebKit rendering engine on which its Chrome browser is based. The company is naming its new engine "Blink."

The WebKit project was started by Apple in 2001, itself a fork of a rendering engine called KHTML. The project includes a core rendering engine for handling HTML and CSS (WebCore), a JavaScript engine (JavaScriptCore), and a high-level API for embedding it into browsers (WebKit).

Though known widely as "WebKit," Google Chrome has used only WebCore since its launch in late 2008. Apple's Safari originally used the WebKit wrapper and now uses its successor, WebKit2. Many other browsers use varying amounts of the WebKit project, including the Symbian S60 browser, the BlackBerry browser, the webOS browser, and the Android browser.

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FF and Chrome WebRTC chat

Today, Google and Mozilla both demonstrated their commitment to WebRTC — an open-source project to create in-browser voice and video chat without additional software — by making the first video call between Chrome and Firefox using the standard. WebRTC was built using Javascript and HTML, and aims to provide high-definition video chat with minimal delay without relying on additional apps or potentially vulnerable plugins. So far, the WebRTC standard has had little support — though Mozilla first demonstrated it last year — and cross-browser chat isn't yet available beyond the beta version of Chrome 25 and Firefox Nightly. There's no word on when, if ever, the standard will be adopted across all browsers, but if you're interested...

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Photo

Yesterday saw the outage of several Google services including Gmail and Drive, and the unexplained issue also caused many Chrome browsers to crash. In a thread on the Chromium developer forum, Google Software engineer Tim Steele explained that the issues were due to a misconfigured server that took out Google's Sync platform.

As Wired points out, bad web coding can often cause a browser to crash, but this was something different: the coding of a cloud-based service designed to help you browse caused browsers to crash without any user action. As more people turn to cloud services to help us organize and store our data, the impact of such outages may be far greater.

Update: Google has released the following statement.

"Earlier today,...

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CSS Blend Modes demo. Image: Screenshot/Webmonkey.

We use the term “CSS 3″ all the time on Webmonkey, but technically that’s something of a misnomer. There is no spoon, you see.

In fact, the CSS Working Group, which oversees the CSS specification at the W3C, is cranking out draft specs of new features all the time — the monolithic “3.0″ or “4.0″ versioning was tossed out after CSS 2.1. Instead new features are developed as “modules” so that, for example, the Selector Module can be published without waiting for the Layout Module.

That means there are new CSS features coming all the time.

Adobe’s Divya Manian — who is also one of the developers behind HTML5 Boilerplate — recently gave a talk titled “CSS Next“, which highlights some of the exciting new CSS features coming soon to a browser near you.

Among the cool things Manian highlights are some impressive new tricks for web fonts, including better tools for working with ligatures, unicode and icon fonts.

There are also some impressive new layout tools in the works, namely CSS Regions and Exclusions. We looked at both back when Adobe first proposed them, but since then not only have they progressed to actual draft specs, but they’re now supported in Chrome’s Canary builds (rather than requiring a custom build from Adobe).

It’s still going to be a while before either can claim a spot in your CSS layout toolkit, but there are already a few demos you can check out to see the new layout possibilities Regions and Exclusions offer. Grab a copy of Chrome Canary and turn on “Enable Experimental WebKit Features” in chrome:flags and then point your browser to this demo of Regions and this “shape inside” demo of Exclusions.

Other things Manian covers that we’re looking forward to include CSS Filters and Blend modes. CSS Filters already work in WebKit browsers and allow you to apply effects like blur or grayscale to any HTML element. CSS Blend Modes work just like layer-blending modes in Photoshop and other graphics apps — allowing you to blend layers using modes like “difference,” “overlay,” “multiply” and so on. As of right now you still need a special build of Chromium to see Blend Modes in action.

Manian also covers two intriguing WebKit-only features that aren’t yet a part of any CSS spec, but could be one day. Be sure to read through Manian’s post for more info and a few other new things, including two Webmonkey has covered recently — CSS @supports and CSS Variables.

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Emscripten is an LLVM-based compiler from dozens of languages to JavaScript (previously demoed as a repl and used to port Doom to the browser), and some recent changes have made it a bit faster, and allowed it to compile itself. Some highlights include a redundant variable eliminator, parallelization of the optimizier and compiler, and a new relooper. From the developer's weblog: "With all of the emscripten optimization passes now in JavaScript, I then worked on parallelizing that. ... The speedup can be close to linear in the number of cores. ... For the LLVM to JS compiler, I made the emscripten compiler parallel as well: It splits up the LLVM IR into 3 main parts: type data, function data, and globals. The function data part is unsurprisingly by far the largest in all cases I checked (95% or so), and it can in principle be parallelized - so I did that. Like in the optimizer, we use a Python process pool which feeds chunks of function data to multiple JavaScript compiler instances. There is some overhead due to chunking, and the type data and globals phases are not parallelized, but overall this can be a close to linear speedup. ... [On the new relooper] Note that this update makes Emscripten a 'self-hosting compiler' in a sense: one of the major optimization passes must be compiled to JS from C++, using Emscripten itself. Since this is an optimization pass, there is no chicken-and-egg problem: We bootstrap the relooper by first compiling it without optimizations, which works because we don't need to reloop there. We then use that unoptimized build of the relooper (which reloops properly, but slowly since it itself is unoptimized) in Emscripten to compile the relooper once more, generating the final fully-optimized version of the relooper, or 'relooped relooper' if you will."


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An anonymous reader writes "Last night, Google held its Pwnium 2 competition at Hack in the Box 2012, offering up a total of $2 million for security holes found in Chrome. Only one was discovered; a young hacker who goes by the alias 'Pinkie Pie' netted the highest reward level: a $60,000 cash prize and a free Chromebook (the second time he pulled it off). Google today patched the flaw and announced a new version of Chrome for Windows, Mac, and Linux."


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