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Hurricane Sandy wikipedia

With more than twice the number of edits than any other contributor, Ken Mampel has a reasonable case to call himself the principle Hurricane Sandy Wikipedia editor. However, problems can arise when a single man — particularly one that denies the existence of global warming — takes charge of such a large page. Mempel took it upon himself to delete any mention of global warming from the entry, and was successful in keeping the article global warming-free until the evening of November 1st. Popular Science profiles Mempel, revealing a man obsessed with accuracy, speed, and grammar, who unfortunately let his personal views obscure the impartial truth that Wikipedia is supposed to stand for. After much discussion between editors, a two...

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A symbolic gesture to raise awareness about energy consumption, Earth Hour has grown since its beginning in 2007 in Sydney to now include observances in 147 countries and over 5000 cities. For one hour, lights are switched off at 8:30 local time on the last Saturday in March. Increasing public environmental awareness in China, which has overtaken the United States as the world's biggest polluter, has led 124 cities there to mark Earth Hour. Beginning with the second photograph, click the pictures to see them fade from lights on to the lights switched off during Earth Hour 2012. -- Lane Turner (25 photos total)
Children light candles during a ceremony to mark Earth Hour in Islamabad, Pakistan on March 31, 2012. Earth Hour took place worldwide at 8.30 p.m. local times and as an annual global call to turn off lights for 60 minutes in a bid to highlight energy consumption. (Anjum Naveed/Associated Press)

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Across Greenland's vast white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues about the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. They're measuring the movement of glaciers, the density of the snow pack, the thickness of the ice and more, trying to gauge how much will melt and when. Greenland's Inuit people have been witness to the rapidly changing landscape. The Inuit have countless terms in their language to describe ice in all its varieties, and its disappearance directly affects their lives. Associated Press photographer Brennan Linsley recently spent some time on the massive Arctic island, documenting the researchers, the residents, and the varied ice that dominates the landscape. [33 photos]

The midnight sun illuminates an iceberg, among the many shed daily into the sea from the Jakobshavn Glacier, on July 19, 2011 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Greenland is the focus of many researchers trying to determine how much its melting ice may raise sea levels. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

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ILULISSAT, Greenland (AP) — Greenland’s Inuit people have countless terms to describe ice in all its varieties. This gallery of photographs by Brennan Linsley of The Associated Press is something of a visual vocabulary for the striking forms ice takes on the giant Arctic island.

Greenland’s ice sheet and glaciers are melting more and more as the world warms, sending gushing water and towering icebergs into the sea, threatening to raise ocean levels worldwide in the years and decades to come. Researchers are hard at work trying to gauge how much will melt and when.

Some of the most spectacular icebergs are calved from the 4-mile-wide Jakobshavn Glacier near the town of Ilulissat on Greenland’s west central coast. These icebergs push out into the 30-mile-long Ilulissat Ice Fjord, and then into Disko Bay and eventually the North Atlantic ocean.

The ice, much of it tens of thousands of years old, originates in the 660,000-square-mile ice sheet covering 80 percent of Greenland.

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Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, researcher Carl Gladish walks back after deploying a GPS seismometer, or GeoPebble, to track glacial movement on Jakobshavn Glacier, near Ilulissat, Greenland. Chief researcher David Holland, hopes to eventually deploy scores of the devices to measure ice loss in Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 26, 2011 photo, a melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 18, 2011 photo, icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet float near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, during leisure hours, researchers gather atop nearly two miles of ice, at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation, (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A vein of highly-compacted blue ice runs along the surface of an iceberg shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Two icebergs press up against each other after being shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A Greenlandic Inuit hunter and fisherman steers his boat past a melting iceberg, along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A pool of melted ice forms atop Jakobshavn Glacier, at the fringe of the Greenland ice sheet. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, Arctic researcher Carl Gladish of New York University hammers a steel stake into ice, securing a newly deployed GPS seismometer, or Geopebble, designed to track glacial movement near the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, atop Jakobshavn Glacier, outside Ilulissat, Greenland. The chief researcher, NYU's David Holland, hopes to eventually deploy scores of the devices to help measure ice loss in Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A fishing boat weaves through icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Researcher Brandon Strellis of Georgia Tech exits a small work pod at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation, (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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An iceberg floats in the sea near Qeqertarsuaq, Disko Island, Greenland. Greenland is the focus of many researchers trying to determine how much its melting ice may raise sea levels. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Liquified glacial ice forms into light-absorbing, turquoise hued melt-pools atop Jakobshavn Glacier, at the fringe of the Greenland ice sheet, July 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, in a trench dug into the 2-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet, researcher Brandon Strellis of Georgia Tech chemically preserves ice samples at Summit Station, a small research center situated at the heart of the vast ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, a small laboratory structure bristles with sensors at Summit Station, a remote research center operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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This Friday, July 15, 2011 picture shows Liz Morris, 64, of Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, at Summit Station, a small research facility situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet, days before a month-long, 500-mile research trip via snowmobile. Morris' research trip is funded by Britain's National Environmental Research Council and mounted with the U.S. National Science Foundation's cooperation. In 2003, Queen Elizabeth honored the intrepid Morris with a Polar Medal, given in recognition of distinguished service in Arctic and Antarctic exploration. Three years earlier the monarch inducted her into the Order of the British Empire. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 18, 2011 photo, floating ice, left over from broken-up icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, nearly cover the seafront in Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A boat steers slowly through floating ice, left over from broken-up icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, outside Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Drops of water fall from a melting iceberg near Nuuk, Greenland. Greenland is the focus of many researchers trying to determine how much its melting ice may raise sea levels. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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