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A Canadian duo and their Kickstarter-funded, pedal-powered helicopter have won one of the longest-standing challenges in the history of aviation — keeping a human-powered aircraft hovering up in the air at height of at least 9.8 feet, within a 32.8 by 32.8-foot square, for 60 seconds minimum. The challenge, known as the Sikorsky prize, has withstood at numerous failed attempts since it was established in 1980, 33 years ago, even with a $250,000 bounty. But it was finally bested earlier in June by the Atlas, a gigantic human-powered helicopter designed by Cameron Robertson and Todd Reichert, aeronautical engineers from the University of Toronto, who cofounded a company AeroVelo.

The pair funded the construction of their winning aircraft through a successful Kickstarter campaign last year, and just barely managed to beat a rival team from the University of Maryland, whose craft Gamera failed to stay within the square-foot range required by the prize, as Popular Mechanics reports.

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“All I want to do is take pictures. I don’t care about anything else,” says celebrated photojournalist Bruce Davidson. The quote is from Cheryl Dunn’s new documentary Everybody Street, which chronicles the masters of New York street photography — from the confrontational Bruce Gilden to hip hop documentarian Ricky Powell. The project has been in the works for a while, and according to the official site, distribution still hasn’t been nailed down, but hopefully the slightly NSFW trailer below can tide you over until its broader release.

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Have you ever misremembered an event, while being totally certain it actually happened? Most people have experienced the unreliability of human memory. As it turns out, false memories are very easy to generate. Scientists at the Riken–MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics have created false memories in mice using a procedure they say would also work for humans.

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Jason Scott, the well-known digital archivist with archive.org who has previously produced a documentary on bulletin board systems, has turned his attention to Def Con — the Vegas convention that now attracts thousands of hackers (and would-be hackers) each year. Def Con: The Documentary sits down with a number of individuals who've been involved with the event from the start, including "The Dark Tangent" himself, Def Con founder Jeff Moss.

Def Con is familiar territory for Scott, who is a longtime attendee and frequent speaker at the conference — and naturally, assembling the narrative of how the world's largest hacker convention got its start fits in well with his day job of preserving internet history.

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President Obama may not consider Edward Snowden a patriot, and he's likely not alone in that assessment. But to some, the NSA leaker is nothing short of a hero. Among Snowden's many supporters is a game development studio out of Germany called Binji. After two weeks of working "night and day," the company has produced Eddy's Run — The Prism Prison, a side-scroller browser game it describes as a "deep thank you" and "a bow" to Snowden, You're placed in the shoes of Eddy and tasked with avoiding secret agents, deadly drones, surveillance cameras, and other threats in your quest to evade a pursuing government.

Unsurprisingly, reporters serve as your allies along the way. Talking to them gets you four exploding laptops which serve as the game's weapons, with EMP blasts and other tactical tools also at your disposal as Eddy's Run progresses, And unlike a Temple Run knockoff that surfaced on iOS and Android earlier this week, it's clear Binji actually put some legitimate effort into this title. It won't take home any gameplay awards, but the studio is more concerned about raising player awareness regarding the ongoing government surveillance that prompted Snowden's saga to begin with.

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Pei-Shen Qian was a quiet, unassuming neighbor — but according to a recent New York Times article, he was responsible for dozens of modernist forgeries that, together, netted more than $80 million. In his youth, Qian had been part of an experimental art movement in China, but friends say he had become frustrated with the American art market in recent years, selling art on the street and working briefly at a construction site. According to a recent indictment, he responded by turning to fraud, painting forgeries of "undiscovered masterpieces" by famous painters like Jackson Pollock and Barrett Newman and selling them to art dealers beginning in 1994. The scheme caught the FBI's attention in 2009, when questions were raised about the authenticity of some of Qian's work, and one art dealer has already been indicted for peddling Qian's fakes. But while the FBI has caught up with many of Qian's art-world accomplices, the forger himself is still at large.

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Dave Eggers, the acclaimed author behind A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius and A Hologram for the King, will release his latest novel, The Circle, this fall. The book will revolve around a fictional, but eerily familiar entity, "the Circle," which is described as "the world's most powerful internet company."

The Circle, run out of a sprawling California campus, links users’ personal emails, social media, banking, and purchasing with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of civility and transparency.

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Emoji; they've conquered the world, featured in novels, and more recently they've allowed us to track Twitter's mood in real time. Now, a new app for iPhone automatically generates another internet staple, ASCII art, using only emoji. Emojify lets you take photos with your phone's camera, or pull existing images from your camera roll, and replaces the pixels with emoji. Once you've selected your photo, you'll be able to control image size (ranging up to 16-megapixel files for poster-sized prints) and contrast before exporting or sharing your creation.

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What if you could compile all of YouTube's worst-rated videos in one place? Considering the sheer volume of user content that's uploaded to the site every second, it's a daunting challenge. Nonetheless, that's the idea Boootube is trying to execute on; it's a running collection of the most down-voted clips on YouTube. In other words, it's the best of the worst; these are videos that have received hundreds and often times thousands of unfavorable votes from viewers around the world.

Selections include Lil Wayne trying his hand at guitar, controversial baby yoga demonstrations, and an expletive-laced rant targeted at an innocent Dunkin Donuts staffer. Unflattering political ads and blatantly racist rants are also a common theme. There's also a 15-minute video where the clip's host uses Photoshop to prove that the "original" Eminem died only to be quietly replaced by a lookalike. We're all familiar with the overnight sensations and stars that have been catapulted to glory thanks to YouTube. But BooTube serves as a sober reminder that the good is often outweighed by the bad or mediocre.

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Technically, 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of Street Fighter, the classic Capcom fighting game franchise that's made a comeback over the past few years. This weekend, however, Capcom has made "I Am Street Fighter," a 72-minute documentary film, available to stream free on YouTube. Originally only available as part of the $149.99 Street Fighter 25th Anniversary Collection, the film traces Street Fighter all the way back to its roots, through the glory days of the arcade, and finally to today's tournament scene, where pro players can make a name for themselves internationally.

Listen to directors and players of the original Street Fighter talk about the series' humble origins, see life-long fans share their stories, their art, and their collections of Street Fighter games, hear former Capcom community manager Seth Killian explain the game's intricacies, and see famous professional players Justin Wong and Daigo Umehara explain the epic conclusion of one of the most infamous showdowns in fighting game history.

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