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More and more people are posting projects on Kickstarter, hoping to get their business ideas funded by peers.

But that doesn't mean their ideas are finding any more success on the crowdfunding site.

In the past six months, the amount of Kickstarter projects posted has grown 50% to 76,909, GigaOm reports.

Less than half of the projects -- 44% according to a Kickstarter spokesperson -- have successfully meet their monetary goals. And on Kickstarter, it's an all or nothing deal. If posters don't raise the full amount of money they're seeking, they don't see a dime.

When you think about it, 44% is actually a pretty high success rate. The average fundraising on Kickstarter is between $1,000 and $10,000, so it's no small amount of cash that's being swapped between strangers.

In some categories, the likelihood of Kickstarter success is higher than in others.

"Dance" is the most successfully funded category on Kickstarter; 70% of those projects successfully meet their goals. Although projects like the Pebble watch have been wildly successful, the technology category is one of the least successful on Kickstarter. Only about 33% of those projects are funded in full.

Here's a chart from Gigaom, which breaks down Kickstarter success by category:

kickstarter chart

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Launderingmoney_thumb

Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter are a great way for people with great ideas to get money while circumventing the traditional hurdles of appealing to venture capitalists. Turns out they are also a great way for people with stolen money to get around the law.

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skywiseguy writes "I have only used Kickstarter to back a single project so far, but one of the backers of that project pointed us to a project promising video capable glasses which was once one of the top 10 highest funded projects in Kickstarter history. After reading through the comments, it is obvious that the project has not met its expected deadline of 'Winter 2011,' but the project team rarely gives any updates with concrete information. All emails sent to them by backers get a form letter in reply, they routinely delete negative comments from their Facebook page, and apparently very soon after the project was funded, they posted pictures of themselves on a tropical beach with the tagline, 'We are not on a beach in Thailand.' Their early promotions were featured on Engadget and other tech sites but since the project was funded they've rarely, if ever, communicated in more than a form letter. So at what point can a project like this be considered to have failed? And if you had backed a project with this kind of lack of communication from the project team, what would you consider to be the best course of action? Disclaimer: I have not backed this project, but I am very interested in funding Kickstarter projects and I do not want to get caught sending money to a less than reputable project. According to the above project's backers, Kickstarter claims to have no mechanism for refunding money to backers of failed projects and no way to hold the project team accountable to their backers. This does not seem like a healthy environment for someone who is averse to giving their money to scam artists."


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For decades, there was one really successful financial model for making big, profitable games: a publisher providing project funding to a developer in exchange for a large share of any eventual profits. It's a model that's seen its share of disruptions in recent years, with direct game downloads and free-to-play, micro-transaction fueled games often succeeding without the need for a publishing middleman.

But the traditional model saw one of its biggest disruptions earlier this month, when developer Double Fine, sporting talent behind classic point-and-click adventure titles like Grim Fandango and The Secret of Monkey Island, managed to raise over $1 million of funding for a new adventure game project in under 24 hours, directly from tens of thousands of eager fans on Kickstarter.

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An analysis of what makes Kickstarter game projects successful, with comments from indie developers who have made their goals, and insights from Kickstarter's own director of community -- and plenty of links to successful campaigns to boot.

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Starting out as an indie game developer is hard! Ridiculously hard! But it doesn’t have to be. Here's some great tips to help indie game developers to raise funds, build a community, and get free market research on Kickstarter!

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