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Crytek

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The recent announcement of GFACE - a social media network with Cloud support, backed by Crytek - demonstrates that the concept of "gaming over IP" is likely to gain further traction as viable competition to both current and next-gen consoles. OnLive is out now with a full service, Gaikai is set to follow suit this year, and while there's a strong argument that these emerging technologies are not really a match for the local console experience, it's only fair to remember that these are first-gen technological products. They will improve, and even in the here-and-now they do work, even if the experience is quantifiably sub-optimal compared to local gaming.

The question is, to what extent can Cloud gaming services improve? Much has been made of the fact that even with ultra-fast fibre-optic networks, latency will always be an issue. Similarly, lossless video quality requires so much bandwidth (720p60 is well over 100 megabytes per second) that it's not going to be viable on gaming services. Given that video will always be compressed, to what extent can picture quality - which varies dramatically from one instant to the next - get better?

In this article we'll be tackling both of these issues, presenting the argument that improvements to internet infrastructure combined with optimising the current latency pipeline could well be enough to bridge the gap between Cloud services and what you might call a standard console experience.


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The arrival of the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 redefined the landscape of games development. Cutting edge gaming software and technology - once the preserve of PC alone - found a new home: game developers that had once pushed back the frontiers of PC graphics and gameplay soon realised that the consoles presented a more profitable, viable market. Creators like Infinity Ward made the switch early, but as the generation progressed, even PC stalwarts like Crytek and id software transitioned across to console-led development.

With PC gaming becoming less relevant, graphics card manufacturers were left facing a big problem: how to make their pricey, enthusiast products more appealing to the core audience when the lion's share of games were mostly console ports. Running these games at ever-increasing frame-rates and resolutions could only go so far - the hardcore gamers wanted more but the development of impactful PC exclusive features could not be justified by the returns. Meanwhile, PC graphics technology continued to improve by leaps and bounds but the standards setting releases like the original Crysis and Doom 3 were becoming ever rarer. There's a strong argument that PC graphics tech was far more powerful than it really needed to be, with precious little to show for the mammoth levels of rendering might on tap.

Make no mistake - even the entry-level enthusiasts' graphics cards of a few years ago effortlessly annihilate the RSX and Xenos graphics cores in the current generation consoles. The venerable NVIDIA 8800GT - for years an enthusiast favourite, and still capable of running most new titles adequately - has the consoles beaten in terms of available RAM, bandwidth, stream processors and virtually any other metric you would care to mention. It can run the original Crysis in all its unoptimised glory at a fair old lick, even at 1080p - something that the consoles can't match, even running on the more streamlined CryEngine 3.


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Click here to read The Fanciest Video Game Art You've Ever Seen

Today's Fine Art is something different. Rather than look at one game, or one studio, we're looking at a loose collaboration of artists from all over the industry brought together by one thing: a very fancy art dealership. More »

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Hear the name Crytek and your first thought is probably absurdly polished graphics and the super shooters Crysis and Crysis 2, perhaps the CryEngine. But the German developer is looking beyond the hardcore market and taking aim at more a more casual audience with it's Kinect game Ryse and a free-to-play browser title, Warface.

To find out more about where the company sees itself in the current market and what it's planning for the future, GamesIndustry.biz sat down with founder Avni Yerli and Carl Jones, director of global business development, as the company announces a free CryEngine SDK for non commercial use.

Talking about the companies recent move towards free-to-play, Yerli was keen to point out that Crytek's decision to invest isn't just a case of bandwagon jumping. He revealed the company has been looking into the model for around four years.


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Luminous Studio targets DirectX 11.

Square Enix has lifted the lid on its new Luminous Studio engine, which it intends to use to power its next generation of games.

Technology Writer Zenji Nishikawa was allowed a sneak peek at the engine, and reported his findings on Japanese website Impress Watch (translated by Andriasang).

Luminous Studio is said to be similar to Epic's Unreal Engine, which is used in countless games, including Gears of War 3 and Batman: Arkham City.


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Crytek is releasing a free version of CryEngine 3 for non-commercial use, effective today.

The SDK includes the CryEngine 3 Sandbox level editor, and the "What you see is what you play" tool, "designed by and for professional developers."

"With the release of our SDK we encourage creators to try out CryEngine 3 and hope it will lead to new companies being formed and using our engine," said director of global business development Carl Jones.


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 all you need.
CryEngine 3 is now free to use, as long as you’re not making any money from your creations. Crytek explain: “You can use CryENGINE 3 for free in educational facilities, even if you are charging tuition. We have always offered our engine for free to educators, but now individual students can also freely download the engine and use it to learn about real-time 3D development. CryENGINE 3 is also free for non-commercial use; if you are distributing your game or application for free (and not charging for your work in producing it, whether directly or indirectly), no additional license is required.” There’s also apparently an indie license agreement for small projects, but you need to get in touch with Crytek for details.

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