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Culture of New York City

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Sportscaster Adam Lefkoe of WHAS11 in Louisville, Kentucky dropped 41 Seinfeld references into five minutes on air. More at Syracuse.com.

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Original author: 
Jack Lowe

Directed by Heather Quinlan - a New Yorker who's lived in all five boroughs - If These Knishes Could Talk is a new short documentary exploring the New York accent: what it is, how it's evolved, and the love/hate relationship New Yorkers have with it. "The New York accent is as much a part of this country as those spacious skies and purple mountains majesty. It's the voice of the melting pot, a lingua franca that united immigrants from all over the world, and became the vibrant soundtrack of a charming, unforgiving and enduring city."

Writer Pete Hamill, director Amy Heckerling, and screenwriter James McBride all appear in the documentary, discussing how a toilet becomes a terlet, and why New Yorkers eat chawclate and drink cawfee, as well as revealing a few surprising facts such as why there's no such thing as a Brooklyn accent, and why an Italian like Rudy Giuliani talks like an Irishman. If These Knishes Could Talk is premiering tonight at the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival and will also be showing at the Hoboken Film Festival and Midtown's Quad Cinema later this year.

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Have you ever wondered how big Jerry Seinfeld's New York apartment actually was? Or where all the rooms were in Homer Simpson's Evergreen Terrace house? DeviantArt user Iñaki Aliste Lizarralde draws out TV and film's most famous apartments and houses as blueprints, including everything from closets to phones. My Modern Met has collected some of the best ones, including the house from Up that's actually bigger on the inside than the outside.

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Calendar

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld once revealed the secret to honing a craft: practice every single day, then mark a calendar with an 'X' and never break the rapidly growing chain. Many have taken the advice to heart over the years — even GitHub. Wired notes that the project development site recently added a calendar inspired by Seinfeld’s famous mantra to its project pages. Some have belittled the update, saying that sheer volume isn’t worthwhile, while others have passed it off as simple gamification. It may not be popular with seasoned coders, but it should prove to be a useful tool for those who need some extra motivation.

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Fashion’s tastemakers and trendsetters started packing up on the eighth and final day of New York Fashion Week Thursday as shows are beginning this week in London, followed by Milan and Paris. But as the runway previews of fall looks continue in Europe, some early trends have emerged. The most popular looks to grace the [...]

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Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, made a name for himself as a crime photographer in New York in the 1930s and 1940s, creating gritty scenes of the horrors of urban life.

After ditching his career as a photojournalist, Weegee moved to Los Angeles in 1947. It was in California that he began experimenting with distorted images, photographing celebrities, news clippings and even scenes from television. Though he produced distorted images of a wide range of subjects from presidents to movie stars, Weegee turned his surrealist lens on the classical world’s most famous painting, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, in the late 1950sHis photographic homages to the da Vinci masterpiece feature one with an elongated forehead, one with a square face and another image with two sets of eyes. In one picture, the photographer even manages to flip her enigmatic smile upside down.

Recently, the Prado in Madrid confirmed its copy of the masterpiece was painted by one of Leonardo da Vinci’s students in the master’s studio at the same time da Vinci was working on his own Mona Lisa. “The copy invites you to see it with new eyes,” says Prado curator Miguel Falomir of the museum’s version, which features vibrantly restored colors and definition.

While there are no shortage of homages to the da Vinci masterpiece, Weegee’s surrealist interpretations of the Mona Lisa are beautiful and unique in their own right. They also invite the viewer to revisit the iconic painting with ‘new eyes’—but hopefully not two sets of them.

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Weegee, the tenacious news photographer famous for his gritty images of New York in the 1930s and ’40s, is the subject of two concurrent shows in Manhattan, one at Steven Kasher Gallery and one at the International Center for Photography. The exhibit at the ICP includes historical material, such as Weegee’s book “Naked City”, newspapers, films and images made by other photographers.

Weegee worked as a freelance newspaper photographer when wire services were just beginning include photos, a time when New York City had several dailies. Strategically, Weegee was well situated for the challenge of keeping up with the crime surge–as police and government crackdowns increased in the city between 1935 and 1941, the rate of organized-crime murders increased dramatically. His apartment was across the street from police headquarters, where he listened to his police-band radio receiver for updates, often managing to arrive on the scene before the police. Murders, he claimed, were the easiest to photograph because the subjects never moved or got temperamental. To read more about Weegee’s illustrious career, click here.

At an East Side Murder, 1943. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

Weegee, The dead man’s wife arrived…and then she collapsed, ca. 1940. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

Hats in a pool room, Mulberry Street, New York, ca. 1943. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

This photo by an unidentified photographer shows Weegee on the scene, December 9, 1939. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

Anthony Esposito, booked on suspicion of killing a policeman, New York, January 16, 1941. © Weegee/International Center of Photography.

Police officer and lodge member looking at blanket-covered body of woman trampled to death in excursion-ship stampede, New York, August 18, 1941. © Weegee/International Center of Photography

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