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waderoush writes "In November, Lytro, the maker of the first light field camera for consumers, upgraded its viewer software to enable a feature called 'Perspective Shift.' In addition to refocusing pictures after they've been taken, Lytro audiences can now pivot between different virtual points of view, within a narrow baseline. This 3-D capability was baked into Lytro's technology from the start: 'The light field itself is inherently multidimensional [and] the 2-D refocusable picture that we launched with was just one way to represent that,' says Eric Cheng, Lytro's director of photography. But while Perspective Shift is currently little more than a novelty, the possibilities for future 3-D imaging are startling, especially as Lytro develops future devices with larger sensors — and therefore larger baselines, allowing more dramatic 3-D effects. Cheng says the company is already exploring future versions of its viewer software that would work on 3-D televisions. 'We are moving the power of photography from optics to computation,' he says. 'So when the public really demands 3-D content, we will be ready for it.'"

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Google Tech Talk January 4, 2013 (expand for more info) Presented by Tim Conway ABSTRACT GoPano plus uses a specially curved mirror. Its shape gathers light from all directions and reflects it into the lens of your camera. This single image/video shows everything in a 360° ring around the GoPano plus. On your computer, this warped image is transformed ("unwarped") into an interactive scene where anyone can control the view. Once you have the raw photos and/or videos, you'll need software to edit them. We provide PhotoWarp (for images) and VideoWarp Director (for 360° videos). Whether you're shooting 360° stills, panoramic videos, or both, we've got you covered. The GoPano plus has a standard 67mm photographic filter thread base which can be easily adapted to fit almost all the digital cameras, DSLR lenses, and camcorders. GoPano Step Rings can adapt any camera or lens with a filter thread to connect directly to the GoPano plus. SPEAKER INFO: Tim Conway (www.imdb.com Not to be confused with actor in the Dorf videos, Tim Conway has been creating, supervising, and creating unique technology in the field of Visual Effects and Post Production since 1997. His latest endeavor is a camera lens with an attached mirror which allows you to take 360 degree panoramic still images or video. This Tech Talk was presented at Google's LA office.
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Fujifilm X-Pro1 hero (1024px)

Fujifilm has a history of making beautiful cameras, particularly in its X series. The X100 and X10 are more than just pretty faces, too — both deliver gorgeous pictures and video. They're designed more as companions to a DSLR rather than your one and only camera, though, and the entry price is high for that kind of camera. In January at CES, Fujifilm stole the show by releasing a camera that could be your one and only: the X-Pro1, which pairs the company's flair for retro design with interchangeable lenses.

Technically speaking, there's a lot to like about the camera in addition to its lens mount or its good looks: a 16-megapixel APS-C X-Trans sensor that Fujifilm claims could rival many full-frame DSLRs, ISO range up to ISO 25,600, a...

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via cdn2.sbnation.com

Samsung has said that it's going to put more of a focus on its interchangeable lens cameras, and the company has just shown us its refreshed NX series: the DSLR-like NX20, the rangefinder-styled NX210, and the diminutive NX1000. All three of the cameras now feature 8fps continuous shooting and a maximum ISO of 12,800, and they all share the same Samsung-developed and Samsung-built 20.3-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor. That sensor is similar to what you'd see in a prosumer DSLR or Sony's NEX series of cameras, and the latter is the Samsung NX series' primary competition — both are trying to present compelling arguments to customers who are looking for more than a smartphone camera (something that's now replacing many point-and-shoots) and...

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5

Panasonic added a new model to its Micro Four Thirds camera lineup today, in the Lumix DMC-GF5. It's the successor to the GF3, and rather than making sweeping ergonomic changes — there's a better grip on the GF5, but it's mostly the same design — Panasonic just added its latest technology to the camera. The GF5 features a totally redesigned, 12.1-megapixel Live MOS sensor, plus the latest iteration of the Venus processor, and the two team up to offer some pretty impressive specs — like ISO range up to ISO 12,800, and 0.09-second autofocus. You can also now focus on as small an area as a single pixel, which Panasonic says makes the autofocus more accurate as well. The camera shoots 1080i video at 60 frames per second in AVCHD, or...

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For "Russia by Rail," the NPR photographer David Gilkey traveled nearly 6,000 miles aboard the Trans-Siberian Railway, catching glimpses of passing towns and people; smoke trailing high above factories and fields quilted with snow.

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Fellow San Francisco band Seventeen Evergreen have just been announced as the opener for the Tycho show this Saturday at The Independent. They recently released this Terri Timely directed video for Polarity Song. Incredible color and definition in this. Not sure how it was shot but I’m assuming some high end HD DSLR and a healthy amount of post. Beautiful stuff.

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The smell of fixer is one of my oldest memories of photography and my dad’s Nikon SP and the black Besseler enlarger would eventually become part of my own path into photography. Robert Levin was a writer at heart, and didn’t flatter himself with comparisons to the pros of the day, who happened also to be his professional associates and friends, but took some pleasure in his creations. As an editor, he assigned Henri Cartier-Bresson to photograph Dr. Anthony Pisicano, a local Long Beach pediatrician, and the Frenchman visited or house. Weegee passed by the house once, and Life’s Bill Ray photographed our family for a Life Magazine. Bob’s photography books were among my earliest photographic influences, although the truth is that I came to photography in my 20’s, and that his friendship with Howard Chapnick of Black Star, who also lived in Long Beach, was a major door-opener for me.

When my father passed away in the early 70’s I was given two large boxes by his secretary at Redbook Magazine, containing thousands ofj prints, negatives and personal papers from his childhood in the Bronx, where he attended Dewitt Clinton High School amd eventually the City University of New York and then Columbia. Like many of the upwardly mobile Jewish families living in the Bronx, the Levins had begun a slow migration to Long Island. For Alfred and Frances Levin and their two boys, Long Beach was the preferred summertime residence. Alfred was a jewelry salesman, first travelling in the South and than opening up his own business in the Jewelry Exchange on 47th Street. America was both affluent and expanding, and young adults were mobile and interested in things like Kodak Brownie cameras, which were extremely popular and easy to use, and made photography available to the growing American middle class. The first section of pictures taken in Long Beach, of Bob and his friends were made with one of them.

Robert served in the military during World War II as a writer for Stars and Stripes, the army’s newspaper. But he returned to Europe after the war with my mother, Martha, and spent a year, writing and photographing extensively, this time with a black Rollei twin lens reflex camera. These photographs are among most interesting, moody still-lifes and landscapes, often inspired, or so she jokingly insisted, by the direction of my mother, who had studied art history, and considered herself to have the finer eye of the two. In fact, she took full credit for his ability with the camera.

After returning to New York, Robert freelanced as a writer for men’s magazines like Pageant and Coronet, writing detective stories and doing interviews with celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor and Jacqueline Kennedy. The young couple lived in Long Beach in a rented apartment, and looked foward to a bright future in a country of expanding opportunity. I was born in New York City in 1950, and with my sister Peri followed two years later Before settling in and buying a house with a GI Loan, my parents decided to return to Europe, and the four of us we sailed off to France pn the Liberte. We lived in England, France, Spain and Italy, and my dad continued to freelance for the men’s magazines. typing off manuscripts and mailing them off to his editors in New York. By this time he had purchased a Nikon 35mm camera which had become the rage in photography and was aware of the work of Cartier-Bresson, as he was of the progressive writers like Jean-Paul Satre, and of course the American Henry Miller, and in our little family he had a opportunity to document what was a very idyllic and transformational time. He liked street photography, but some of the most compelling images are clearly of his own family. I don’t remember him posing any pictures, he was definitely a bit of a lurker. He rolled his own film, and developed much of it in a portable darkroom.

The family returned to Long Island so that I could begin school. We bought a Levitt house in Long Beach, and eventually Bob would take an editorial position in Manhattan at Redbook Magazine and commuted by train or car from Long Beach. The photographs from this time period are less candid and more representative of special events, a school play or graduation, or a family gathering. Eventually he was able to purchase a larger home in nearby Lido Beach very close to the water and it is here that the photographs tapered off. A divorce, a new life in Manhattan, made photography more of an afterthought, and less of a passion. There was less time, and certainly much less time for the family on Long Island.
What has become clear to me, is that the camera and the photographs of the family represented a vision of what family life was supposed to be, rather than the reality of what it was, or what perhaps what my father was.

My own career as a photography, if you could call it a career, has roots in the work of my father’s pictures. My comfort about the camera, came directly as a result of its presence as an indicator of love. I started with the Nikon SP that was used for all of his European work, although by this time the SLR had become the magazine photographer’s workhorse, and I quickly gravitated to the newer cameras, for better or worse, and the eventual assignments that took me all over the world and allowed me more success than I ever thought possible as a professional photographer.

But looking back at my father’s pictures, what impresses me most is that some of the most meaningful images that we can take are of things that are of our families, our friends, our communities, and the moments of our lives that are worth preserving. All photographs are proof that something happened and a way to mark our time as we live our days, one at a time. The increased volume of images, from cell-phone cameras, digital SLRS and the like as easy to use as they are, doesn’t really change the reason for using a camera. And I can only wonder what the children of today will see forty years from now when looking back
at the images taken by their parents. Will they be nostalgic for the 2010s? Probably so,

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Camerabag.tv recently sat down with New York-based photographer Tim Barber to speak about his background, his inspiration, the historical origins of tinyvices, and his affinity for rudimentary point-and-shoot cameras over expensive DSLRs. Barber also speaks about the first time he met Ryan McGinley and the found memories he has of travelling the world with him.

Camerabag.tv's main aims are "to celebrate the image-makers and to highlight the beauty and style of the camera" and "to raise the profile of emerging photographers, while also providing an intimate glimpse of the workplace and trade tools of the masters."


Watch the video.


www.camerabag.tv

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