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Almost Dawn in Libya, a collaborative project for which eight photographers raised money for four simultaneous Libyan exhibitions of photographs from the country’s conflict—as described here on LightBox—reached its fundraising goal of $40,000 and will be completed in the next few weeks. Photographer André Liohn, one of the guiding forces behind the initiative, spoke to LightBox from Misrata, Libya, where he was preparing for the installation in that city.

“That we finally have the pictures in our hands,” says Liohn, “is very exciting.”

Liohn estimates that they are about 80 percent done with printing the photographs for the shows, but the progress is dodged by remnants of the conflict that the exhibitions are intended to address. On the day before Liohn spoke to LightBox, militiamen seized control of the Tripoli airport. Elections are also on the horizon. It’s still unclear whether the other photographers who are part of the Almost Dawn project—Lynsey Addario, Eric Bouvet, Bryan Denton, Christopher Morris, Jehad Nga, Finbarr O’Reilly and Paolo Pellegrin—will have difficulty getting to Libya for the openings.

But, after everything endured by the photojournalists who captured the Libyan conflict on film, these obstacles are not overly daunting. Liohn says he’s ready to get the shows up and running, particularly because the people he meets in Libya are ready too. Despite—or perhaps because of—the trauma of war, they seem, to him, eager to help with the vision of healing through photography.

“We feel that the project is pretty much as much theirs as it’s ours,” says Liohn, citing the people who have donated both living space and expensive printing services. “To me, it’s very courageous that they are taking so much responsibility for making this happen.”

The Almost Dawn in Libya team has also provided LightBox with the panoramic view shown here, as designed by Paolo Pellegrin and curator Annalisa d’Angelo, which replicates the gallery set-up that will be seen in Libya. The lack of captions was part of the original vision for the project, meant to allow viewers to see past any divisions between Libyan regions and peoples. Although work remains to be done—unsurprisingly, considering the task of mounting four identical exhibitions across a still-scarred nation—the shows are expected to open in early July in four Libyan cities, Tripoli, Misurata, Benghazi and Zintan, with the goal of providing fodder for debate and discussion about the country’s future among those who come to see the photographs.

“They fear that Libya will not become a good country,” says Liohn. “Still they are not letting the fear keep them from making Libya into what they want.”

Learn more about Almost Dawn in Libya—and the photographers involved at their emphas.is fundraising page here.

Almost Dawn in Libya will be shown on the following schedule:

July 1 – Misurata – Goz-elteek-Hotel
July 4 – Benghazi – Benghazi Museum
July 10 – Tripoli – Dar Al Funnun  – Tripoli Art House
July 12 – Zintan – Zintan Media Center

You can also follow the exhibition’s progress at ADIL‘s Facebook page, here.

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TIME contract photographer Yuri Kozyrev and I recently spent two weeks driving across Libya, from east to west, surveying the aftermath of the Arab Spring’s most thorough revolution to get a sense of the lessons learned and the challenges that still lie ahead for the vast, oil-rich country. The war-ravaged city of Misrata was one of the key stops on our journey, not only for its significance as perhaps the most brutally repressed flashpoint in Libya’s uprising against Muammar Gaddafi, but also because of its significance on the emotional map of many foreign correspondents who covered this war, myself and Yuri included. Yuri lost one of his close friends here, Tim Hetherington. Hetherington, an award-winning British photographer and director, was killed along with the great American photographer Chris Hondros, while covering the fighting on Misrata’s Tripoli Street on April 20, 2011. The two had travelled, along with other journalists, to Misrata by boat from the rebel-held eastern city of Benghazi.

At the time, Misrata was under a fierce and brutal siege by Gaddafi’s forces, but the city had become a symbol of the Libyan resistance—and Gaddafi’s violent tactics to stop it. Yuri was in frequent contact with Hetherington at the time, hoping to make the same perilous journey by boat. “I thought it was very important to go there,” he told LightBox this month. “It was almost impossible to cover the war from the eastern front line, and Misrata was a hotspot.”

Yuri never made it there; the sudden deaths of Hetherington and Hondros put an end to those plans. So our trip last month marked his first visit. “We had never heard about Misrata before the war, but when the war happened, Misrata was a very important place. And not just Misrata, but Tripoli Street,” he says. “For me it was on a personal level. It was in the news, and everybody mentioned it. But for me, it’s also about friends.”

Seeing Tripoli Street was hard for Yuri. There were moments, as we surveyed the wreckage, moving silently past block after block of shell-shocked neighborhoods, that I could see the grief on his face. Misrata’s war museum—“The Ali Hassan Gaber Exhibit,” named for the al-Jazeera cameraman killed covering the revolution—is something we came across by chance on our first day in the city. In it, Misrata’s residents and former fighters have meticulously documented the horrors of their city’s experience in war. There are rows of rockets, missiles, and tanks; clothing and furniture hauled away from Gaddafi’s compound in Tripoli; photographs of the rebels’ gruesome injuries; official documents detailing regime corruption; and the portraits of all 1,215 of the city’s martyrs. Yuri told Lightbox what it was like to visit the exhibit, set amid the destruction on Misrata’s Tripoli Street: “Inside there are hundreds of portraits of Libyans who were killed. When I walked through, looking through these portraits for the dates they were killed, suddenly I stopped. On the left side there were two portraits of Tim and Chris.”

Misrata’s residents are keen never to forget the details of this horrific point in their history. Indeed, everywhere we traveled in Libya, we found similar efforts to immortalize the names and faces of those lost; and the tragic events that transpired. But all along Tripoli Street, there is also rebirth, and there is hope. New billboards and storefronts have sprung up from the city’s ashes. Uniformed traffic cops in white gloves patrol intersections—despite the absence of a fully functioning central government. And construction workers in orange vests clear rubble and tend to new flowers in the grassy medians. Stores selling wedding dresses and school supplies have re-opened their ground floor display windows; even as the gaping holes caused by rockets and tank shells remain to be fixed just above. “There are a lot of signs of war but you can see that there is life,” Yuri says. “There is life in different ways, girls on the street, boys on motorbikes, and flower shops.”

“At the same time I didn’t want to do any kind of investigation [into Tim and Chris’ deaths], to try to understand what happened,” he says. “It happened. It happened last year, and I remember it, and that’s it. I was not in the mood yet to try to understand. I know that’s the street. I know that’s the place.”

Abigail Hauslohner is TIME’s Cairo correspondent.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

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The photographer André Liohn, who got an early start on covering the civil war in Libya and stayed in the country through the killing of Muammar Gaddafi, was recently asked not to use that term—civil war—to describe the conflict. Liohn had returned to Libya to introduce a project that he started with seven other photographers who covered the war-torn African nation last year. They call the project Almost Dawn in Libya, and through it they plan to exhibit their photographs of the war in the Libyan cities of Tripoli, Misurata, Benghazi and Zintan. But as Liohn was telling a young lawyer who had been active in promoting the revolution on the internet about their work, the photographer was confronted about his choice of words.

He responded that what he had seen seemed to fit his own conception of a civil war, but she told him that, to her, the conflict didn’t fit that category. “That you can come to us and challenge this concept that we have of it—that’s exactly what the project is for,” Liohn says.

The photographers behind Almost Dawn in Libya—also known as ADIL, an acronym that sounds like the Arabic word for justice—aim to use their work to help Libyans come to grips with what happened there in the past year, to turn galleries into spaces for public debate. They are not the first to think about what would happen if those who might appear in war photography got to see those pictures. Susan Sontag described in On Photography the way that a photographer can seize control of a narrative and Susan Meiselas’ In History examined the ethics of conflict photography in Central America in the 1970s and ‘80s. But, says Liohn, there’s a new factor in play these days.

“The Libyan revolution or the Arab spring, it’s probably the first time where victims of a violence were able to document their own suffering. Mobile phones, videos, graphic design have been extremely important to unify people. They did it through images,” he says. “But today the images that they created have lost the context of the violence.” Liohn says that, without that context, the images that were once a rallying cry have become a source of fragmentation: each city has its own images of how brave its people were or how much they suffered. By showing the same exhibit of 100 pictures, not sorted geographically or chronologically, in four different places at the exact same time, the ADIL team hopes that Libyans will be able to start a dialogue that is not divided by city.

And Liohn says that, through ADIL, the photographers involved will cede their control of the images. “We are not showing it to a public that never saw Libya,” he says. “We are actually exposing ourselves to the public.” Part of the project involves bringing the photographers back to speak to that public and hold workshops, though, so Liohn says that hearing dissent about the way Libya is portrayed is part of the point. The larger point, however, is that the people who see the exhibits may then be inspired to discuss the country’s direction.

“The people there are waking up from this kind of dream-nightmare situation,” says Liohn, “and no one actually knows how the day is going to be.”

Learn more about Almost Dawn in Libya—and the photographers involved (André Liohn, Lynsey Addario, Eric Bouvet, Bryan Denton, Christopher Morris, Jehad Nga, Finbarr O’Reilly and Paolo Pellegrin) at their emphas.is fundraising page here

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It's been just over a month since the capture and death of Libyan dictator Moammar Khadafy, ending his 42-year reign. Since then, the rebels have declared that the nation is liberated, installed a transitional government, and started the process of writing a constitution. Still, substantial problems remain. Pockets of fighting have erupted among rival tribes and some rebels have refused to give up their cache of weapons. Doctors continue to struggle to treat the wounded and sick, with a few of the most severely injured being sent to rehabilitation centers in Boston and elsewhere. Last weekend, Khadafy’s son, Seif, was captured and could face war crimes for his part in the conflict. -- Lloyd Young (EDITOR'S NOTE: We will not post a Big Picture on Friday, November 25, due to the Thanksgiving Holiday.) (40 photos total)
Anti-Khadafy fighters acknowledge the crowd during a review of the brigades from the eastern region to commemorate the liberation of Quiche in Benghazi Oct. 27. (Esam Al-Fetori/Reuters)

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Associated Press photographer, Rodrigo Abd, has been capturing the scene in Libya for the past two weeks.

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters act as security in downtown Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. Moammar Gadhafi's forces rocketed rebel fighters in the formidable strongholds and training camps they have built up in the strategic mountain heights southwest of the Libyan capital, rebels said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A man smokes a water pipe in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Mustafa Mazeg shaves off the beard of Hatem Mohamed in his barber shop in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter washes his face after having lunch downtown in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo / Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Garbage is seen in front of a pre-Moammar Gadhafi flag downtown in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters on security duty downtown in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. Moammar Gadhafi's forces rocketed rebel fighters in the formidable strongholds and training camps they have built up in the strategic mountain heights southwest of the Libyan capital, rebels said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter on security duty and carrying a pre Moammar Gadhafi flag downtown in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. Moammar Gadhafi's forces rocketed rebel fighters in the formidable strongholds and training camps they have built up in the strategic mountain heights southwest of the Libyan capital, rebels said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A man prepares a coffee in a shop as people watch a television broadcast of a speech by U.S. President Barack Obama in the U.S, Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, May 19, 2011. Moammar Gadhafi's forces rocketed rebel fighters in the formidable strongholds and training camps they have built up in the strategic mountain heights southwest of the Libyan capital, rebels said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A graffiti drawing depicting Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi is seen in Benghazi, Libya. After more than 40 years under Gadhafi, Libyans in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi have taken to mocking the Libyan dictator with colorful caricatures. Before residents in the rebel-held east ripped themselves free from Gadhafi's rule, drawing such satirical pictures of the leader in public was unthinkable, and the regime would have severely punished anyone caught doing so. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A road is seen though the broken glass of a bus in Misrata, Libya, Saturday, May 21, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Young women walk in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi forces in Misrata, Libya, Sunday, May 22, 2011. The European Union established formal diplomatic contact with the Libyan opposition by opening an office in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, a general view of Tripoli street from the terrace of a building used by snipers loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi during fighting with rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. Since the weeks-long siege of the city ended in mid-May, Misrata residents make pilgrimages to Tripoli Street, site of the fiercest fighting in the battle for Libya between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi's forces. People gawk at the wreckage of bombed-out buildings with gaping holes and walls pocked by bullets, and shoot photos of charred hulks of tanks, rubble-strewn streets and a side walk museum featuring drumloads of bullet casings, uniforms of dead enemies, and unexploded munitions. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, a rebel fighter guides reporters inside a building used by snipers loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi during fighting with rebels for the control of Tripoli Street, Misrata, Libya. Since the weeks-long siege of the city ended in mid-May, Misrata residents make pilgrimages to Tripoli Street, site of the fiercest fighting in the battle for Libya between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi's forces. People gawk at the wreckage of bombed-out buildings with gaping holes and walls pocked by bullets, and shoot photos of charred hulks of tanks, rubble-strewn streets and a side walk museum featuring drumloads of bullet casings, uniforms of dead enemies, and unexploded munitions. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, a family walks during a visit to Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, a man walks next to traces of the battles in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, women visit a makeshift museum where ammunition is displayed on Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, men visit a market where forces loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi hid their tanks, meters from Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between Moammar Gadhafi forces and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A destroyed car is seen next to Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi forces in Misrata, Libya, Sunday, May 22, 2011. The European Union established formal diplomatic contact with the Libyan opposition by opening an office in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A man covers from the dust next to destroyed buildings in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi forces in Misrata, Libya, Sunday, May 22, 2011. The European Union established formal diplomatic contact with the Libyan opposition by opening an office in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, Mohamed (no second name supplied) cries while holding the pictures of seven sons who disappeared along with his wife allegedly taken by Moammar Gadhafi's forces during the fighting against rebels in Misrata, Libya. Misrata's missing list grows longer _ now at least 1,000 _ as rebels expand their territory and more families come forward with names of those who disappeared during the seven-week siege by government forces on Libya's third-largest city. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, men look at portraits of rebel fighters killed in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. Since the weeks-long siege of the city ended in mid-May, Misrata residents make pilgrimages to Tripoli Street, site of the fiercest fighting in the battle for Libya between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi's forces. People gawk at the wreckage of bombed-out buildings with gaping holes and walls pocked by bullets, and shoot photos of charred hulks of tanks, rubble-strewn streets and a side walk museum featuring drumloads of bullet casings, uniforms of dead enemies, and unexploded munitions. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Sunday, May 22, 2011, Mohamed El Taleb pose for the picture with the portraits of his two sons, Salim, 17, left, and Adel, 27, who disappeared allegedly by Moammar Gadhafi forces two months ago in Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Monday, May 23, 2011, men walk next to a destroyed tank in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Monday, May 23, 2011, an effigy is seen hanging from electric cables meters away from Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A plastic skeleton and used ammunition is seen in a checkpoint as rebel fighters drive towards the front line with Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Monday, May 23, 2011. On the sign hanging from the skeleton it reads "Destiny of Traitors". (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A wounded Moammar Gadhafi soldier is seen in a rebel pick up after being captured by rebel fighters near the front line, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Monday, May 23, 2011. The head of Libya's opposition has arrived for talks with Turkish leaders in a sign of improving ties after Turkey urged Moammar Gadhafi to step down and withdrew its diplomats from Tripoli. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter, left, looks though binoculars towards Moammar Gadhafi forces on the front line, 25 km west of Misrata, Libya, Monday, May 23, 2011. The head of Libya's opposition has arrived for talks with Turkish leaders in a sign of improving ties after Turkey urged Moammar Gadhafi to step down and withdrew its diplomats from Tripoli. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel instructor tells a man how to stand in a military position during a training exercise in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go to fight on the front line against Moammar Gadhafi forces. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Tuesday, May 24 , 2011, a table and a chair are seen in an apartment used by snipers loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi and destroyed during fighting with rebels for the control of Tripoli Street, Misrata, Libya. Since the weeks-long siege of the city ended in mid-May, Misrata residents make pilgrimages to Tripoli Street, site of the fiercest fighting in the battle for Libya between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi's forces. People gawk at the wreckage of bombed-out buildings with gaping holes and walls pocked by bullets, and shoot photos of charred hulks of tanks, rubble-strewn streets and a side walk museum featuring drumloads of bullet casings, uniforms of dead enemies, and unexploded munitions. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel military advisor Mosbah Firjani, 59, poses for a picture during a rebel military training session in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go fight on the front line against Moammar Gadhafi forces. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Men look at the destruction on Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi forces in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011.The Obama administration reached out to the Libyan rebels and said Moammar Gadhafi would "inevitably" be forced from power as the U.S.-backed NATO coalition launched a withering bombardment on the Libyan leader's stronghold of Tripoli. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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A rebel instructor teaches weapons skills during a training exercise in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go fight in the front line against Moammar Gadhafi's forces. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Men chant slogans during a military training session in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go to fight in the front line against Moammar Gadhafi forces. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Men exercise during a military training session in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. According to rebel military authorities, after six days of military training, new recruits are ready to go to fight in the front line against Moammar Gadhafi's forces. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel instructor teaches self defense during a training exercise in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Young men slide down a rope during a military training exercise in Misrata, Libya, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter walks in a old and abandoned Catholic Church used by Moammar Gadhafi forces as a military camp on the east front line, 25 km from Misrata, Libya, Wednesday, May 25, 2011. Predicting success in Libya, President Barack Obama said that Moammar Gadhafi would ultimately be forced to step down if NATO keeps up its military campaign with the U.S. playing a key role. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Wednesday, May 25, 2011, a boot is seen on Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan-leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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In this photo taken Tuesday, May 24 , 2011, a barricade is seen on Tripoli street from the terrace of a building used by snipers loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, during fighting with rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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In this photo taken Wednesday, May 25, 2011, a man waters a plant on a square in Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this photo taken Wednesday, May 25, 2011, a girl poses for the picture next to a military tank on Tripoli Street, the center of fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and rebels in downtown Misrata, Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter stands guard on an abandoned house used as a military camp on the east front line with Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km from Misrata, Libya, Wednesday, May 25, 2011. The Obama administration reached out to the Libyan rebels and said Moammar Gadhafi would "inevitably" be forced from power as the U.S.-backed NATO coalition launched a withering bombardment on the Libyan leader's stronghold of Tripoli. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters mourn the dead of a comrade at the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. The vice chairman of the Libyan rebel administration says it could take up to two years to organize elections, backtracking on promises of a six-month transition to democracy and providing fodder for growing rumbles of dissent. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Relatives and comrades mourn the death of rebel fighter Mohamed Manssor Zarmoh, 22, who was killed during fighting against Moammar Gadhafi forces in the west front line, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Jose Emmanuel Piaggessi, 23, left, an Argentinean that fights with rebel forces, collects ammunition from a pickup at the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. The deputy leader of Libya's rebel administration said it could take up to two years to organize elections, backtracking on promises of a six-month transition to democracy and adding to internal dissent already brewing within the movement seeking to topple Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Relatives and comrades carry the coffin of rebel fighter Mohamed Manssor Zarmoh, 22, who was killed during fighting against Moammar Gadhafi forces on the western front line, west of Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Relatives and comrades mourn the death of rebel fighter Mohamed Manssor Zarmoh, 22, who was killed during fighting against Moammar Gadhafi forces on the western front line, west of Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters drink coffee and eat bread after fighting against Moammar Gadhafi forces in the front line, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. Spain said it and other European governments had received a message from Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi proposing an immediate cease-fire in his country's war. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters rest after fighting against Moammar Gadhafi forces in the front line, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. Spain said it and other European governments had received a message from Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi proposing an immediate cease-fire in his country's war. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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A rebel fighter walks among fired ammunition in the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. Spain said it and other European governments had received a message from Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi proposing an immediate cease-fire in his country's war. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters cross the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. The deputy leader of Libya's rebel administration said it could take up to two years to organize elections, backtracking on promises of a six-month transition to democracy and adding to internal dissent already brewing within the movement seeking to topple Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters take positions on the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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Rebel fighters rest inside an abandoned barber shop in the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter points his gun as other comrades cross the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. The vice chairman of the Libyan rebel administration says it could take up to two years to organize elections, backtracking on promises of a six-month transition to democracy and providing fodder for growing rumbles of dissent.(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter gives orders to comrades at the front line between the rebels and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 25 km west from Misrata, Libya, Thursday, May 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter stands next to pick up converted into an armored combat vehicle at the front line with Moammar Gadhafi forces, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. Russia could help mediate Moammar Gadhafi's exit from power, a senior Russian diplomat said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters observe Moammar Gadhafi's forces' positions on the front line, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. Russia could help mediate Moammar Gadhafi's exit from power, a senior Russian diplomat said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Doctors and rebel fighters pray at a makeshift emergency clinic for wounded rebel fighters on the front line with Moammar Gadhafi's forces, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. Russia could help mediate Moammar Gadhafi's exit from power, a senior Russian diplomat said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters prepare breakfast on the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi's forces, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. Russia could help mediate Moammar Gadhafi's exit from power, a senior Russian diplomat said. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters pull security in the south front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter rests on a machine gun mounted on a pick up on the front line between them and Moammar Gadhafi forces, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter observes Moammar Gadhafi's forces position on the front line, 30 km south from Misrata, Libya, Friday, May 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A mother holds her daughter on the Azzurra passenger ferry during a trip from Misrata to Benghazi, Libya, Saturday, May 28, 2011. Civilians are now able to take the commercial ferry from the once besieged city of Misrata to the de facto rebel capital of Benghazi in east Libya. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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New cadets for the Libyan rebel army dance and chant anti Moammar Gadhafi slogans before the ceremony graduation in Benghazi, Libya, Sunday, May 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A new cadet for the rebel army tells a boy holding a pre-Moammar Gadhafi flag to not interrupt the ceremony graduation in Benghazi, Libya, Sunday, May 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Relatives of new cadets for the Libyan rebel army celebrate during the ceremony graduation in Benghazi, Libya, Sunday, May 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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People walk in the old city in downtown Benghazi, Libya, Monday, May 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A man smokes while fishing in Benghazi, Libya, Monday, May 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Italy's Foreign Minister Franco Frattini, right, greets rebel officials after signing a memorandum of understanding in Benghazi, Libya, Tuesday , May 31, 2011. Italy's foreign minister says Rome has signed a deal with Libya's rebels to provide them with a credit line of hundreds of millions of euros. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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In this picture taken Monday, May 30, 2011, people celebrate during the inauguration of the new rebel satellite TV station called Libya Alhurra, or Free Libya, in Benghazi, Libya. Last week, the rebels finally got the go-ahead for a satellite TV operation that will put them head-to-head with Gadhafi's operation _ though that too was a fight. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A headless statue in a crate at Benghazi Cathedral, Benghazi, Libya, Tuesday, May 31, 2011. The double-domed cathedral is a neoclassical treasure designed by Italian architects and built between 1929 and 1939. It fell into disuse when Italians left the country the year after Gadhafi seized power in a coup in 1969 and briefly was the headquarters of the Arab Socialist Union before it fell into disuse. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Ibrahim Obaidy, 13, looks at a reel of film as light streams through a pained glass window, Benghazi, Libya, Tuesday, May 31, 2011. The double-domed cathedral is a neoclassical treasure designed by Italian architects and built between 1929 and 1939. It fell into disuse when Italians left the country the year after Gadhafi seized power in a coup in 1969 and briefly was the headquarters of the Arab Socialist Union before it fell into disuse. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel soldier tries to wake up a comrade, rear, as another walks by during a fumigation to control insects next to a checkpoint in Ajdabiya, Libya, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters pray next to a checkpoint in Ajdabiya, Libya, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Rebel fighters relax in a makeshift base next to a checkpoint in Ajdabiya, Libya, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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People look at portraits of people believed killed by Moammar Gadhafi's security forces, downtown in Ajdabiya, Libya, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A rebel fighter reads the Quran next to a check point in Ajdabiya, Libya, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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People stand near destroyed vehicles after an explosion at the Tibesty hotel in Benghazi, Wednesday, June 1, 2011. A car bomb exploded next to the hotel, where foreign diplomats stay in Benghazi, a rare attack in the Libyan rebels' de facto capital. A rebel spokesman said the blast caused no injuries or deaths. The burning car sent plumes of black smoke into the air. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A Libyan volunteer crawls on his stomach during a military training course before going to the frontline in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. According to rebel authorities, after three weeks of intense military training, the volunteers are ready to fight against troops loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A Libyan volunteer jumps over his comrades during a military training course before going to the frontline in the rebelstrong hold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. According to rebel authorities, after three weeks of intense military training, the volunteers are ready to fight against forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Libyan volunteers swim in the Mediterranean sea during a military training course before going to the frontline in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Libyan volunteers practice shooting stances during a military training course before going to the frontline in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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Libyan volunteers crawl on their stomachs during a military training course before going to the front line in the rebel strong hold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A Libyan volunteer rests after a military training course before going to the front line in the rebel strong hold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

 Two Weeks in Libya with Rodrigo Abd

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A bed where Libyan volunteers rest is seen in a military training center in the rebel strong hold of Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, June 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) #

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