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Gone are the accolades of heroism and courage that just one year ago greeted Egypt’s so-called “Facebook youth” when they led the popular uprising against the authoritarian regime of President Hosni Mubarak. Of that emotional and miraculous 18-day revolt, many proud Egyptians say the youth succeeded where decades of repressed and compromised opposition parties had not.

But 12 months later, Tahrir Square is a ravaged and frustrated version of its former self. Egypt’s youth movement is struggling to keep the revolution going, challenging the ruling military council the only way they know how—through protest. But with the country’s economy and stability sliding further into turmoil, the youth heroes of yesterday are failing to win the hearts and minds of the Egyptian majority today. Instead, many say they’re desperate to move on from the square.

Abigail Hauslohner is TIME’s Cairo correspondent. Find her on Twitter @ahauslohner.

Dominic Nahr is a contract photographer for TIME, represented by Magnum Photos. You can see more of his work from the Egyptian revolution here

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A photographer and a video journalist collaborated to document young Egyptian activists, their role in the Arab Spring and the realities many failed to foresee.

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Over the weekend, Cairo's Tahrir Square once again was the home of massive protests against the country's leadership. This time, both secular and Islamist groups gathered in the tens of thousands for a "Friday of One Demand." Together, they called on Egypt's new military rulers to honor their promise to leave power after the fall of former dictator Hosni Mubarak in February. Riot police and military units descended on the square, breaking up encampments, making arrests, brutally beating some, and firing tear gas and rubber bullets into the crowd. (Egyptian doctors are claiming that live ammunition has been found in several bodies.) According to the Ministry of Health, the toll as of this morning includes least 1,500 injured and a minimum of 23 dead. The renewed clashes come just one week before parliamentary elections scheduled for a week from today, a vote that now may be jeopardized. Gathered here are photos from Tahrir Square this weekend, as Egyptians once again took to the streets to be heard and paid dearly in their clashes with security forces. [36 photos]

A masked protester throws a gas canister towards Egyptian riot police, not seen, near the interior ministry during clashes in downtown Cairo, Egypt, on November 20, 2011. Firing tear gas and rubber bullets, Egyptian riot police on Sunday clashed for a second day with thousands of rock-throwing protesters demanding that the ruling military quickly announce a date to hand over power to an elected government. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

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