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Elliott Erwitt

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Martine Franck, an esteemed documentary and portrait photographer and second wife of Henri Cartier-Bresson, died of cancer in Paris on Aug. 16 at the age of 74. A member of Magnum Photos for more 32 years, Franck was a co-founder and president of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation.

“Martine was one classic Magnum photographer we could all agree with,” said photographer Elliott Erwitt. “Talented, charming, wise, modest and generous, she set a standard of class not often found in our profession. She will be profoundly missed.”

Born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1938, Franck studied art history at the University of Madrid and at the Ecole du Louvre in Paris. In 1963, she began her photographic career at Time-Life in Paris, assisting photographers Eliot Elisofan and Gjon Mili. Although somewhat reserved with her camera at first, she quickly blossomed photographing the refined world of Parisian theater and fashion. A friend, stage director Ariane Mnouchkine, helped establish Franck as the official photographer of the Théâtre du Soleil in 1964—a position she held for the next 48 years.

As her career grew, Franck pursued a wide range of photographic stories, from documentary reportage in Nepal and Tibet to gentle and evocative portraits of Paris’s creative class. Her portfolio of the cultural elite includes photographic peers Bill Brandt and Sarah Moon as well as artist Diego Giacometti and philosopher Michel Foucault, among others. In 1983, she became a full member of Magnum Photos, one of a small number of female members at the legendary photographic agency. Balancing her time between a variety of stories, her work reflects an innate sensitivity to stories of humanity.

In a piece published in the Guardian in 2006 about her time photographing a Buddhist monastery in Nepal, Franck chose to highlight a photo (slide #2 above) of an elder monk sitting with a young apprentice.

“I was there for an hour, just sitting quietly in a corner, observing,” she explained. “The picture is somehow a symbol of peace, and of young people getting on with old people. Although I didn’t think that at the time—in the moment, it’s just instinctive. Afterwards, maybe, you realize what the photograph means.”

Her humanitarian work paired her with numerous social humanitarian organizations and was heralded for the truths it revealed. But her name was also often associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

In an interview on Charlie Rose, Franck recalled her first time meeting her future husband in 1965.

“His opening line was ‘Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets,’” she recalled. They married in 1970.

Throughout her career, Franck served as a powerful advocate, both for Magnum and for the continued legacy of her husband. Serving as the president and co-founder of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation, Franck ensured that the spirit of his work survived.

Franck continued to work on her own photography, participating in group projects with Magnum, including “Georgian Spring.” As recently as this April, Franck’s expansive collection of portraits were exhibited in Paris at the Galerie Claude Bernard.

Magnum photographer and President Alex Majoli described Franck as a dear friend and a steady foundation within the photo agency. “Magnum has lost a point of reference, a lighthouse, and one our most influential and beloved members with her death,” he said in a statement released by Magnum over the weekend.

She is survived by her daughter, Melanie.

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During his 38 years of snapping elegant, action-packed baseball pictures, Charles Conlon was the singular figure who captured the early years of modern baseball; from 1904 to 1942, he was the sport’s de facto official photographer. And with the recent release of The Big Show: Charles M. Conlon’s Golden Age Baseball Photographs, some freshly discovered shots are being added to the Conlon canon. The compendium, published by Abrams Books in September, is a fitting follow up to Baseball’s Golden Age, Conlon’s 1993 book of the photographer’s images, which was also being re-released last month.

Conlon wasn’t raised with a camera in his hand. At the turn of the century, he was a newspaper proofreader, toiling for the New York Evening Telegram. That paper’s sports editor, John Foster, was also the assistant editor of the annual Spalding Baseball Guide. This book was not only a promotional publication for the sporting goods company, but, in the words of famed New Yorker baseball writer Roger Angell, “indispensable to any true fan.” As Angell writes in the foreward to Baseball’s Golden Age, “these pocket-size baseball compendiums contained the most up-to-date rules of the game, complete statistics and detailed summaries of the previous season, scheduling for the upcoming season, essays, editorials, and hundreds of photographs.”

Foster knew Conlon had a hobby: photography. So he asked Conlon if he’d put it to use, in his spare time, for the Guide. Over the next four decades, Conlon took some of the most iconic shots in baseball history. An unforgettable close-up of Babe Ruth, a young DiMaggio taking a swing, and Ty Cobb sliding into third base — his teeth-clenched, dirt flying in the air — are among his greatest hits.

It’s memorable images like these that appear in The Big Show, which features a surprising shot of Ruth in a Brooklyn Dodgers uniform – he was a coach for the team in 1938. Elsewhere, the 1917 Philadelphia Athletics are seen taking military instruction—the American League president wanted to show that his teams were taking part in the war effort, and portraits of Hall of Famers DiMaggio, Christy Mathewson, Connie Mack, Phil Rizzuto, Walter Johnson, Tris Speaker and Lou Gehrig are also included in this collection.

While Conlon loved the ballpark, his gig was risky. “Aside from countless narrow escapes, I was seriously injured twice,” he says in the ’93 book. “On one occasion, less than half an hour after I had assisted in caring for a brother photographer who was hit in the head by a batted ball, a vicious line drive down the first base line caught me just above the ankle, and I was unable to walk for a couple of weeks.” A second baseman for the New York Giants, Larry Doyle, had a habit of tossing his bat, which sent the shutterbugs ducking. “[Giants manager John] McGraw saw me get a close shave on day from a Doyle bat,” Conlon said, “and ordered Larry to tie the stick to his wrist with a thong.”

Sean Gregory is a staff writer at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @seanmgregory.

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Elliott Erwitt generally likes to let his pictures do the talking. “I’m very bad about talking about things,” he tells me with a smile, during a recent sit-down to look through his latest book, Sequentially Yours, published this month by teNeues.

The book playfully presents a series of unscripted vignettes that bear the personal hallmark and humor of his classic images and movies, but with an original twist— rather than single shots, the photos are shown as sequences. The result is somewhere between single exposures and films, and the stories play out like silent movies—touching, funny, sad, irreverent and full of surprise.

Erwitt uses his film sparingly; he’s the first to acknowledge that he does not take as many frames as most photographers when he shoots. “The process is sometimes more interesting than the finished picture,” he says. And it’s that thought that served as the impetus for Sequentially Yours. Looking through his archive, Erwitt decided it made more sense to show sequenced images— as opposed to a single shot a la Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “Decisive Moment.”

“You always look for the best picture, but sometimes the pictures are not that great alone. But in a group, they become interesting,” Erwitt says, citing the series of people trying to close an umbrella on a windy day. “None of these are a picture on their own, but as a sequence of 32, it’s hilarious—not being able to close the umbrella and going home with it open.”

The book’s layout mimics Erwitt’s photographs in style—classic and effortless—and each of the vignettes has different constructs and different outcomes—often open to interpretation—that surprise and entertain. There are iconic images of Erwitt’s that you would expect to be the final statement in a particular sequence that actually appear in the middle of a story, proving that the iconic image can come at different points in the process and that Erwitt continues to shoot with a natural curiosity beyond the point where other photographers might stop after they’ve gotten the picture.

In a photo series of an old man and his dog, Erwitt says “the picture is of course the man talking to the dog—having had his discussion, he goes on his way.” In another series, which takes place at a graveyard, he says, “You really don’t know what is going to happen—it starts with a woman going to a cemetery to deposit some flowers and a dog follows her.” The last picture shows the dog rolling on the ground—and could stand on its own as the picture—but it is made more interesting by those that precede it. But even as the punch line, this image is still open ended. Is the dog playing dead or simply being playful?

These sequences reveal how Erwitt shoots, and he clearly has a relaxed approach and patience. “It’s like fishing. Sometimes you catch one. You lay in wait for something to happen— sometimes it happens, sometimes it doesn’t,” the photographer says of his process.

Along with the stories, there are Erwitt’s iconic photographs of public figures. The familiar images give further context by the frames which were taken immediately before or after. A group portrait taken on the set of the The Misfits movie reveals the chemistry of the cast in the build up to the final image. Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev are shown as a dyptich, and a series of Che Guevara portraits are simply four pictures taken from a single photo shoot. In a Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier fight sequence, the subtlety is almost lost in the magnitude of the moment. Erwitt’s explanation of this unique series is almost as surprising as Ali being knocked to the canvas. While the accredited photographers shot handheld directly at ringside, Erwitt shot from the audience a distance away, with the camera on a tripod, so you can see that all three pictures are taken from the identical position.

And while most of the image sets are taken in a concentrated time frame, there are a couple of notable exceptions. Two photos of Erwitt’s first daughter—one in which she is pregnant and the other three months later with her baby—and a series which ends the book, showing Erwitt’s personal agenda covers adorned with photographs of his two daughters taken over a thirty year period.

Erwitt has published nearly 40 books, but Sequentially Yours provides a perfect, original and refreshing context for his intuitive and instinctive images. His playful humor and wit are as sharp as ever. Here, Erwitt gives you a sense of what happens next, the end point being sometimes comic, sometimes poignant and often with a wink.

Sequentially Yours was published this month by teNeues. Erwitt will participate in a book signing at the International Center of Photography in New York on Nov. 4.

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Name- Adrianna Keczmerska
Age- 19 years old
Where are you from?- I am originally from Poland, currently based in Ipswich, UK where I have recently moved from a smaller place in England called Harwich.
Your equipment- I use a Canon Eos 450D for my digital photos and a beautiful Minolta X-500 for the analogue ones.
Influences and photographers you like- My main influence is light! Nice sun light, especially the one early in the morning or in the late evening when it's just about to set. I also get inspired by people, whether they are family and friends or total strangers. Everyone is equily beautiful and inspiring when I look at them as an object to photograph.
The photographers that inspire me the most are Annette Pehrsson, Leo Tage-Hansen, Elliot Erwitt, Richard Billingham, Jackson Eaton and a whole lot of others! I'm always on a look out for some inspiring people.
A little about you- I moved to England 6 years ago when I was just 13 and all that mattered to me was staying in my hometown of Iława forever. I had my friends and family there and I really didn’t want to leave the country. Now, 6 years later I am so grateful to my parents for making me move. It has opened so many doors and opportunities for me that I would have never had if I had stayed in Poland. And you know what, I don't think there is a more inspiring place to live than England, the same place that was hell for me 6 years ago.

Flickr page
cargocollective.com/adrianna-keczmerska19

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ALL PHOTOS BY ADRIANNA KECZMERSKA

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First off, big thanks to Mifsud Photographic,  who are supporting Photojournalism Links with their banner for the next 12 months.

This week’s round-up…

As I’m sure you all know by now, South African photographer Anton Hammerl who had been missing in Libya since early April and allegedly in government detention, had in fact been in fact been killed already on April 5…My sincerest condolences to Anton’s friends and family…

NPPA: Photojournalist Anton Hammerl Was Shot, Killed, April 5 In Libya (NPPA: May 2011)

BJP: Photojournalist Anton Hammerl is dead, says family  (BJP: May 2011)

Atlantic: South African Journalist Anton Hammerl Killed in Libya (Atlantic: May 2011)

NYT: Photographer Killed in Libya (NYT Lens: May 2011)

TIME Lightbox: Anton Hammerl in Memoriam (TIME LB: May 2011)

Human Right are demanding Libya to release Hammerl’s body…

HRW: Libya: Release Body of South African Photojournalist (HRW: May 2011)

Features and Essays

This week’s highlight was Alex Webb’s work on TIME Lightbox…

Alex Webb: The Suffering Light (TIME LB: May 2011)

…and his Violet Isle on Magnum in Motion…

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb: Violet Isle (MiM: May 2011)

Some Paolo Pellegrin landcapes from Japan…

Paolo Pellegrin: Tsunami Aftermath (Magnum: May 2011)

Michael Christopher Brown started using an iPhone to record Libya after dropping his SLR apparently..

Michael Christopher Brown: The War in Libya (TIME LB: May 2011)

The above dead rebel fighter made also an appearance in Guy Martin’s The Siege of Misurata  series

You may remember that Ben Lowy was also shooting iPhone hipstas in Libya…GQ have his other Libya work up tho…

Ben Lowy: Libya (GQ: May 2011)

Espen Rasmussen, Terje Bringedal, Torsten Kjellstrand: The Amazing Amy (MediaStorm: May 2011)

Daniel Berehulak: In India coal towns, many miners are children (LA Times Framework: May 2011)

George Georgiou: Crisps and Curry (Panos: May 2011)

Peter di Campo: Ivory Coast – War ’s End in the West? (VII Mentor: May 2011)

Giovanni Cocco: Evros (VII Magazine: May 2011)

Scott Brauer:  We Chinese (burn:May 2011)

Graeme Williams: The Edge of Town (Panos Pictures:May 2011) South Africa

Lee Friedlander: Longing To Perform Opera (NYT Mag: May 2011)

Theo Stroomer: Prison Boot Camp (Burn: May 2011)

AP Kevin Frayer in Afghanistan. Two years of work compiled on the Denver Post Blog…

Kevin Frayer: In Afghanistan (Denver Post: May 2011)

James Whitlow Delano: Tsunami/ Sakura (NYT Lens: May 2011)

Mustafah Abdulaziz: Passport Radio (Index) (MJR: May 2011)

Greg Funnell: American Road Trip (Photographer’s website: May 2011)

Articles 

BJP: Protests force World Press Photo exhibition shutdown in Beirut, Lebanon (BJP: May 2011) World Press Photo has been forced to close down its exhibition in Beirut after a winning project by Israeli photographer Amit Sha’al sparked local protests

Pete Brook: A Photo of Fabienne Cherisma by Another Photographer Wins Another Award (Prison Photography: May 2011)

Photography education getting a battering…

Daniel Rubinstein: Towards Photographic Education (APS: May 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.17: The starving child as symbolic marker (DC blog: May 2011)

David Campbell: Vietnam, Afghanistan and the sphere of legitimate aesthetics: developing a critical photographic practice (DC blog: May 2011)

Poynter: What news organizations owe the fixers they rely on, leave behind in foreign countries (Poynter: May 2011)

PDN: Low-cost insurance plans available for photojournalists heading to conflict zones (PDN: May 2011)

PDN: How to shoot a book cover photo in 15 minutes (PDN: May 2011)

David Walter Banks: My Waking Life: NYPH’11 (Luceo blog: May 2011)

Melissa Golden: On gender and photojournalism: a response to Paul Melcher (DVAFoto: May 2011)

New York Times discusses work by Zed Nelson and Lauren Greenfield in Annenberg show “Beauty CULTure”…

NYT Lens: Beauty’s Sharp Edges (NYT Lens: May 2011)

Miki Johnson: Who supports crowdfunded projects? And why? (Emphas.is: May 2011)

Interviews 

Redesigning The New York Times Magazine: A conversation with director of photography Kathy Ryan…

Kathy Ryan (BJP: May 2011)

Magnum veteran Elliott Erwitt discusses commissions, books & exhibitions with Vanity Fair…via @FionaRogers

Elliott Erwitt (VF: May 2011)

John G. Morris : “Eleven Frames” (Vimeo: 2011)

Sebastian Junger on Libya, war journalism and Tim Hetherington’s death (PRI.org: May 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson (6th Floor blog NYT Mag: May 2011)

Carsten Peter (Youtube)

Michel Slomka (NYT Lens: May 2011) Lens Turning Point series

Wim Wenders (BJP: May 2011)

Anton Corbijn (BJP: May 2011)

Tim Rasmussen on Eddie Adams Workshop Q&A (NPPA: May 2011)

Bruce Davidson (ASX)

Ruth Gruber was honored for decades of photojournalism. Many decades. She’s 99…

Ruth Gruber (NYT Lens: May 2011)

WorkshopsEddie Adams Workshop : Deadline May 27

GrantsAlexandra Boulat Scholarship to attend the Toscana Photographic Workshop : Deadline May 31st

EventsLaunch party 8 Magazine The Islam Issue  : Thursday 26 May, HOST Gallery : London

FestivalsGuernsey Photography Festival competition – theme: Journey, prize £5,000

Apps -Wired [review] The V&A’s Figures & Fictions photography app (Wired: May 2011)

Tips and Tutorials – PhotoShelter: Email Marketing for Photographers (PS: May 2011)

Crowd FundingJeff Antebi: Fever Dreams (Kickstarter: May 2011)

Crowd Funding – Jason Eskenazi: The Black Garden (KS: May 2011)

Crowd funding João Pina’s ‘Shadow of the Condor’ (Emphas.is)

Crowd FundingEmphas.is Newsletter May 2011 

Books - Ian Teh’s book TRACES is now available to from Deep Sleep Editions.

Jobs - ActionAid needs a multimedia librarian – 12 months maternity cover. Apply

multiMedia1000Words mag Spring 2011

multiMedia6mois

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Interesting all these legends seem to be getting personal websites at the moment… Christopher Morris…Christopher Anderson…now Gary Knight… at least to my knowledge none of them had websites before…

PhotographersGary Knight

Features and Essays - Martin Parr: China Beaches (Magnum: October 2010)

Features and Essays – Peter van Agtmael: Scenes from a Midterm-Election Road Trip (TIME: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Platon: Burmese Refugees (New Yorker: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Michal Chelbin: The Black Eye (New Yorker: October 2010) Wrestlers after the fight

Features and Essays - Ed Kashi: Punjab (VII: October 2010) Pakistan

Features and Essays – Brian L Frank: Wind of Change in Havana (WSJ: October 2010)

Features and Essays – Noah Friedman-Rudovsky: Beneath Bolivia’s Salt Flats: Lithium Wealth (TIME: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Verso Images: Grozny – A Tale of Many Cities (NYT Lens: October 2010)

Collectives - Verso Images

Elliott Erwitt’s ‘Platinum prints and Classic Snaps @ Magnum Print Room,London….I saw them a couple of weeks ago…It was great to see some of his classics printed …Including a huge print of this…the price tag was something like £13k if  I remember correctly…

InterviewsElliott Erwitt (Telegraph: October 2010)

More on the Larry Clark exhibition in Paris…

Articles - Guardian: Outcry as Paris bans under 18s from Larry Clark exhibition (Guardian: October 2010)

InterviewsIan Teh (Invisible Photographer: October 2010)

ExhibitionsStefano de Luigi: Blanco : 10B Photography gallery : Rome : 15 October – 30 November 2010

My friend Gianmarco Maraviglia, who runs the Parallelozero agency in Milan, got in touch about their new photographer Marco Gualazzini…Check out couple of his features…

Laos – Lao Pop Culture (Parallelozero: 2010)

Indians and the Parmesan Cheese (Parallelozero: 2010)

Wendy Marijnissen has some new work from Pakistan  in her archive…

Rabia’s First (Photographer’s PhotoShelter archive: 2010)

‘Everything gone’ – The Jamshoro drama (Photographer’s PhotoShelter Archive: 2010)

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