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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher


The Evernote interface for Chinese users—and the gateway to commands for a very sneaky backdoor.

Your average workaday botnet uses a command and control server to give the malware bots on infected PCs their marching orders. But as network security tools begin to block traffic to suspicious domains, some enterprising hackers are turning to communications tools less likely to be blocked by corporate firewalls, using consumer services to deliver their bidding to their digital minions. Today, security researchers at Trend Micro revealed the latest case of the consumerization of botnet IT: malware that uses an Evernote account to communicate.

The backdoor malware, designated as VERNOT.A by Trend Micro, is delivered via an executable file that installs the malware as a dynamic-link library. The installer then ties the DLL into a legitimate running process, hiding it from casual detection. Once up and running, the backdoor starts to collect information about the system it has made its home—the computer's name, the person and organization identified as its registered owners, the operating system version, and its timezone. Then it connects to Evernote—specifically the Chinese interface to the Evernote service—to fetch information from notes saved in an account, including commands to download, run, and rename files on its host system.

According to a blog post by Trend Micro Threat Response Engineer Nikko Tamaña, the backdoor may have also used Evernote as a location to upload stolen data. Fortunately (or unfortunately, depending on how you look at it), the account that was hard-coded into the backdoor's channel to home had already been shut down—ironically, because its password was reset after Evernote's recent security breach.

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fetchnotes iphone app

The build-in note-taking app on your iPhone is pretty boring, only recently gaining the ability to sync your notes over the Web to your Mac.

It's not nearly as robust as other apps like Evernote.

But what if there was a way to improve on this simple idea by integrating one of our favorite social media platforms, Twitter?

Meet Fetchnotes.

Fetchnotes is more than just a place to store ideas. Users generate their own organization method through hashtags and followers.

Fetchnote's goal is to make productivity as simple as writing a Tweet. As you tag notes, you're building a productivity system and structure on the fly.

The four person team is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and for the firs time the company is moving beyond just being a repository for notes and transitioning into a dynamic way to execute tasks rather than just store them.

Just a few weeks ago Fetchnotes completely revamped its app and added video previews from Youtube; songs from SoundCloud and Spotify; and article previews from National Geographic, The Onion, CNN, and more sources.

"Fetchnotes offers the easiest input with the most valuable return available," Alex Schiff, the company's CEO told Business Insider. "The two things we're working on now is, how our users are interacting with each other and making our app more useful." 

Download Fetchnotes for free on iOS.

Fetchnotes is a free download in Apple's app store. The service is also available on the web at www.fetchnotes.com. Once you download the app, tap to open it.

This is Fetchnotes' opening screen. We really like the cute art.

Before we sign up for an account we'll highlight some of Fetchnotes' best features. Swipe from right to left.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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phil libin 1020

Phil Libin is the CEO of Evernote, a cloud-based memory assistant and "second brain" app for keeping track of photos, text, links, and other digital ephemera. He took some time to talk to The Verge about his favorite apps, what he's reading, and the future of the "quantified self." Follow him on Twitter at @plibin.

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