Skip navigation
Help

Fashion photographers

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

As a follow-up to my photo collection published in The Atlantic's January 2012 issue (and online), I put out a call for reader photographs with the theme of "America at Work." The response was fantastic. People sent in images from Guam to Massachusetts, and from Florida to California. The photos depict a wide range of jobs, giving a glimpse of what it means to be employed in 21st century America. Many, many thanks to the contributing photographers, and to those who helped spread the word. Both the images and captions come from the photographers. [37 photos]

Workers at Gardiner Farms in Bakersfield, California shake hands on August 31, 2011. Behind them, an almond harvest is separated and loaded into trucks. (© Matt Johnson)

0
Your rating: None

If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.”—Eve Arnold

Photographer Eve Arnold, who died Thursday morning at the age of 99, is probably best remembered for her celebrity photographs of Marilyn Monroe, made over the span of a decade from the early 1950s to those taken on the set of the movie star’s final film, The Misfits. But Arnold also traveled the world to make equally exceptional photographs of the poor and disposed.

Arnold, the daughter of Russian-Jewish immigrants, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1912. In the late 1940’s, she studied photography—alongside Richard Avedon—under inspirational art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in New York. Her first photo story documented African-American fashion shows in Harlem and the project would lead directly to her being granted unprecedented access by Malcom X to document the Black Muslims and the way they worked over the next two years.

In the early 1950’s, she began working for the photo news publications of the day, first for Picture Post, then Time and Life magazines. And in 1957 she became the first woman photographer to join Magnum Photos.

She will perhaps be best remembered for her exceptional photographs of people: the famous, politicians, musicians, artists —among them Malcolm X, Joan Crawford, Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, Jacqueline Kennedy and Monroe. “I look for a sense of reality with everything I did,” she once said. “I didn’t work in a studio, I didn’t light anything. I found a way of working which pleased me because I didn’t have to frighten people with heavy equipment, it was that little black box and me”

But it is the long term reportage stories that drove Arnold’s curiosity and passion. She traveled extensively to make work on regions that had been off limits to the west—to China, Mongolia, the Soviet Union, and also to Cuba, South Africa and Afghanistan. In 1971 she made a film, Women Behind the Veil, going inside Arabian harems and hammams.

Arnold continued to work for respected publications, most notably the Sunday Times color supplement. In 2003 she was honored with an OBE in recognition for her services to photography. Her work is renowned for its intimacy. Whether photographing celebrity or the everyday, Arnold’s portraits are magical, memorable and enduring.


0
Your rating: None

Name- Tatum Shaw
Age- 31
Where are you from?- Originally from Cartersville, Ga. Been living in Portland, Or for the past seven years.
Your equipment- Contax G2
Influences and photographers you like- Juergen Teller, Malick Sidibe, Mark Romanek, William Eggleston, Viviane Sassen, Terry Richardson, Harris Savides, Ryan McGinley, Keith Davis Young, Katherine Squier, Missy Prince.
A little about you- I work as an advertising copywriter at Wieden Kennedy for clients such as Coca-Cola, Target, P&G, Nike. Advertising can get creatively frustrating, so photography allows me to have an un-fucked-with outlet. I started taking photography seriously about four years ago. Currently, I'm working on a few books I hope to have out early next year.

Flickr page
tatumshaw.com/
1_24880017

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

IslBG

3094796820_f251a6bc1c_b

3994430486_2b29cdaeca_b

4331192344_decb80a95c_b

4892052583_0274650ed7_b

6137643624_a3103267ab_b

6167511486_e648c3366e_b

ALL PHOTOS BY TATUM SHAW

0
Your rating: None


quote [Guy Bourdin (1928-1991) was a French avant-garde fashion photographer. Mentored by surrealist Man Ray and inspired by filmmaker Luis Buñuel, Bourdin's fashion shoots were often very strange, sexual, phantasmagoric and occasionally quite creepy. His photography frequently appeared in Vogue and Harper's Bazaar and he shot ad campaigns for Charles Jourdan, Issey Miyake, Chanel, and others. Bourdin was also quietly a filmmaker, working with 8mm, super 8, and 16mm. Above is footage of Dayle Haydon and Sayuko during a 1974 Vogue shoot in Normandy, France. More footage here on YouTube and here on UBUWEB Film. There's also a recent documentary, titled When the Sky Fell Down: The Myth of Guy Bourdin. And in July, Phaidon will publish a small inexpensive hardcover book of his work].
(via Boing Boing)

0
Your rating: None