Skip navigation
Help

Federal Bureau of Investigation

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Dan Goodin

Josh Chin

The Chinese hackers who breached Google's corporate servers 41 months ago gained access to a database containing classified information about suspected spies, agents, and terrorists under surveillance by the US government, according to a published report.

The revelation came in an article published Monday by The Washington Post, and it heightens concerns about the December, 2009 hack. When Google disclosed it a few weeks later, the company said only that the operatives accessed Google "intellectual property"—which most people took to mean software source code—and Gmail accounts of human rights activists.

Citing officials who agreed to speak on the condition that they not be named, Washington Post reporter Ellen Nakashima said the assets compromised in the attack also included a database storing years' worth of information about US surveillance targets. The goal, according to Monday's report, appears to be unearthing the identities of Chinese intelligence operatives in the US who were being tracked by American law enforcement agencies.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
timothy

Techmeology writes "In response to declining utility of CALEA mandated wiretapping backdoors due to more widespread use of cryptography, the FBI is considering a revamped version that would mandate wiretapping facilities in end users' computers and software. Critics have argued that this would be bad for security (PDF), as such systems must be more complex and thus harder to secure. CALEA has also enabled criminals to wiretap conversations by hacking the infrastructure used by the authorities. I wonder how this could ever be implemented in FOSS."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
boesing

sha

The real capabilities and behavior of the US surveillance state are almost entirely unknown to the American public because, like most things of significance done by the US government, it operates behind an impenetrable wall of secrecy. But a seemingly spontaneous admission this week by a former FBI counterterrorism agent provides a rather startling acknowledgment of just how vast and invasive these surveillance activities are.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/04/telephone-calls-reco...

0
Your rating: None

5602111029_159307c5c9_b_thumb

Let’s have a little talk about secrets. There are all kinds of secrets out there in the world: personal secrets, state secrets, secret recipes, secret sauces, top secrets, secret levels in video games, Victoria’s Secret. The list goes on. But as we’re quickly learning from the rapidly unraveling details of David Petraeus’s affair with his biographer Paula Broadwell, secrets are no longer sacred. In a world where America’s chief of secrets— a.k.a. the director of the Central Intelligence Agency —can’t even keep a silly little extramarital affair to himself, there’s something wrong.

0
Your rating: None

hacker

Several international law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, held meetings with German police between 2008-12 to discuss the deployment of a monitoring software to covertly infiltrate computers, according to German government reports and reported by Ryan Gallagher at Slate.

The revelations come in response to questions by Andrej Hunko, a member of German Parliament, after a Berlin-based hacker collective called "Chaos Computer Club" exposed in October that the German police were using potentially illegal software called "Bundestrojaner” (i.e. federal Trojan horse) to spy on suspects.

The Bundestrojaner spyware can be disguised as a legitimate software update and can monitor Internet use, log messenger chats and keystrokes, record Skype calls and activate microphones or webcams to record audio or snapshots to send back to authorities.

German courts approved requests from officials to employ the programs at least 50 times and German law enforcement officials smuggled the spyware onto hard drives of suspected criminals at least 25 times.

International law enforcement agencies have taken notice.

From Slate: 

In a letter from Secretary of State Ole Schröder on March 6, which I have translated, Hunko was informed that German federal police force, the Bundeskriminalamt (BKA), met to discuss the use of monitoring software with counterparts from the U.S., Britain, Israel, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Switzerland, and Austria. The meetings took place separately between Feb. 19, 2008, and Feb. 1, 2012.

The letter goes on to say that the FBI, France's secret service (i.e. DCRI) and UK's Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) met with German law enforcement to discuss the basic legal requirements and the technical aspects of using the highly intrusive surveillance technology, according to Slate.

In 2011 German authorities acquired a license to test a similar Trojan technology called “FinSpy” that was reportedly used for five months by Hosni Mubarak’s Egyptian state security forces in 2010 to monitor Skype accounts and record conversations over the Internet.

The revelations are informative about the desire of governments to employ shady techniques to track citizens but, as Gallagher notes, "we are left with many more questions than answers."

Please follow Military & Defense on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

0
Your rating: None



The FBI can't get into a pimp's Android phone—so it wants Google to hand over the keys.

In addition to accessing the phone, agents also want Google to turn over e-mail searches, Web searches, GPS tracking data, websites visited, and text messages. A federal judge has agreed. Hopefully, digital devices can make life hard out there for a pimp—but the case also reminds us just how much data smartphones generate on even innocuous users.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post

0
Your rating: None


xyzzy123 sez, "Want to make a freedom-of-information request to the FBI or other three-letter agencies for any information they might have about you? This post links to a website that lets you enter personal information (or not, if you prefer), and then automatically print form letters to the correct government offices."

The incident that precipitated the article is pretty bizarre: a woman with a history of protest asked the FBI for her file and discovered that she'd been closely followed. What's more, she learned that despite all that close surveillance, the FBI got her political allegiances completely wrong, describing bitter rivals as fellow travelers and generally getting it all messed up.

Life Get Your FBI File!

(Thanks, xyzzy123!)

0
Your rating: None

odb

Yesterday, an 93-page long FBI document recording the alleged criminal activity of Wu-Tang Clan member, the late Russell T. Jones bka Ol Dirty Bastard, was made public under the Freedom of Information Act. You can read the entire (although, profoundly redacted) thing, which includes accounts of shootings, car jackings and numerous other crimes below.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/77581648/FBI-File-of-Russell-Old-Dirty-Bastard...

0
Your rating: None

Clint Eastwood and Warner Bros. decided to skip this fall’s festival circuit with the biopic J. Edgar. While a good many of the other major fall studio releases have been seen and reviewed in the past three weeks via Telluride, Venice and TIFF, we’ve seen nothing from this biography of America’s most powerful lawman, the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover.

Now the shroud is off the film as Warner Bros. released the first trailer for Clint Eastwood’s latest directorial effort, in which Leonardo DiCaprio plays the FBI chief and Armie Hammer (The Social Network) appears as his second-in-command and rumored love, Clyde Tolson. See the trailer below.

The trailer opens with an in-character narration by DiCaprio as Hoover, before going into a montage of Hoover’s young life and early days with the Bureau. Clyde Tolson is shown as a starry-eyed fan of Hoover, but their relationship isn’t so one-sided, as suggested by a later shot. We see Hoover’s obsession with information and the power it gives him over political figures. In all: looks like more or less the biopic one would expect.

And, just in case you thought Clint Eastwood might change up the measured, calm style he has practiced in the past, forget it: this is pure, deliberate Eastwood. In this case, that’s probably a good thing. Too early to judge the overall impact of the film based on just this bit of footage, but the period recreation appears to be spot-on without feeling put on.

Apple has the HD trailer.

0
Your rating: None