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The absolutely stunning work of Swedish artist Anders Ramsell, who painted each frame as a 1.5 x 3cm work of art. It's taken him a while to complete the epic job; Pesco wrote about the first three minutes last year. The end result runs about 30 minutes, which is exactly how long Blade Runner should be. [Video Link]

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The 1931 Max Fleischer cartoon Bimbo's Initiation is a miracle of awesome, fleischerian weirdness. It's the last Betty Boop cartoon that was personally animated by her creator, Grim Natwick. It's so delightfully bizarre (Leonard Maltin called it "the 'darkest of all" of Fleischer's work), and the perfect way to end the weekend.

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Original author: 
James Cartwright

Please-list

Hold the f*****g phone (it’s imperative that I use an expletive here to emphasise just how excited I am about the news I’m preparing to divulge). Mikey Please has just released a 30 second trailer for his latest short film Marilyn Myller! Bomb. Dropped. In typical Please fashion, Mikey’s giving away little/nothing of the storyline and you’ll get almost no bearing on any narrative from the trailer (someone gets punched, hard, by a disembodied fist) but it feels really good to know that the brilliant mind behind The Eagleman Stag is up to his old tricks again, making pure, unadulterated stop-motion magic for us all to enjoy. Be excited, more will follow!

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(author unknown)

Premiere: ‘La Passione’, James Franco’s New Short Film

As announced, we are premiering James Franco’s new short film, La Passione, right here, right now. It’s a decadent and beautifully shot trip that riffs on Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc, if it were shot on acid and starred the ATL Twins as demons. So without further ado… we present La Passione.

Watch it here

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Original author: 
Russ Fischer

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Earlier today we were talking about the anniversary of Jurassic Park, released on this day in 1993. But in mid-1990, director Steven Spielberg wasn’t yet set to film Michael Chrichton’s novel, which hadn’t been released. Having made Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Spielberg had grown up a bit with the romance Always, released six months after the third Indy picture, and was poised to take over another film related to growing up: 1991′s Hook.

So this 1990 interview catches Spielberg in what looks now like a transitional phase, before the staggering success of Jurassic Park and the first flowering of the digital effects age and the opening of the DreamWorks era. The director talks about many aspects of his career: his non-blockbuster choices (The Color Purple, Always, Empire of the Sun) and lack of Oscar nominations for some of his work. He talks about his desire to make Rain Man, which took director Barry Levinson to the Oscars in 1989, and which Spielberg directed before commitment to Indiana Jones interceded.

This is a candid half hour with a man who was already one of the biggest directors in the world, but who also has many successes in front of him. It’s a great conversation with which to cap off your afternoon.

[The Playlist]

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(author unknown)

Theme from The Conversation by David Shire from The Conversation Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1974, Intrada)

track #1

“…He’d kill us if he had the chance.”

(via jessiethejazz:)

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By JAMES ESTRIN

Haunted by memories of his father's long hospitalization for depression, Johan Willner turned his childhood visions into photographic tableaux.

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(author unknown)

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Original author: 
Mark Frauenfelder

Watching the video about Luiz, the adorable boy who explained why he didn't want to eat octopus, gave me the same feeling as the beautiful ending of Black Orpheus, which is one of the best movie endings ever. It's not really a spoiler either, so enjoy it then watch the entire movie when you can.

    

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Original author: 
Russ Fischer

act-of-killing-trailer-header

I know no one who has emerged unscathed from The Act of Killing. The film might be one of the strangest ever made, as it forces men to confront their actions by recreating them in movie form. But these aren’t just any men — they’re guys like Anwar Congo who, as death squad leaders during the “Thirtieth of September Movement,” staged a coup d’etat in Indonesia in 1965, and then committed genocide through an anti-Communist purge.

Estimates of the death toll vary widely, from 80,000 to one million. By any standard, these are heinous crimes. ”War crimes are declared by the winners,” Anwar Congo says, before happily proclaiming “I’m the winner!”

Today Anwar and other death squad leaders have not been tried as criminals; rather, they hold positions of some social standing. The Act of Killing features their full cooperation. It invites the death squad leaders to recreate their actions as genre movies — westerns, musicals, and so on — and in so doing bring their past back to life. The trailer below shows you some of the effect, and even in this abbreviated form it is deeply chilling.

The Act of Killing hits limited theaters on July 19. Apple has the trailer.

In this chilling and inventive documentary, executive produced by Errol Morris (The Fog Of War) and Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man), the filmmakers examine a country where death squad leaders are celebrated as heroes, challenging them to reenact their real-life mass killings in the style of the American movies they love. The hallucinatory result is a cinematic fever dream, an unsettling journey deep into the imaginations of mass murderers and the shockingly banal regime of corruption and impunity they inhabit. Shaking audiences at the 2012 Toronto and Telluride Film Festivals, The Act of Killing is an unprecedented film and, according to the Los Angeles Times, “could well change how you view the documentary form.”

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