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Max Headroom

Feeling too good about life? Then head on over to Reddit, the Internet’s misanthropic answer to Buzzfeed’s heart-warming listicles. One thread is currently attracting particular attention: ‘What is the creepiest Wikipedia page?’ Most entries are predictably about serial killers, rapists and necrophiles, but here are some which are genuinely uncanny. Abandon all hope, ye who read on.

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Jack Lowe

Directed by Heather Quinlan - a New Yorker who's lived in all five boroughs - If These Knishes Could Talk is a new short documentary exploring the New York accent: what it is, how it's evolved, and the love/hate relationship New Yorkers have with it. "The New York accent is as much a part of this country as those spacious skies and purple mountains majesty. It's the voice of the melting pot, a lingua franca that united immigrants from all over the world, and became the vibrant soundtrack of a charming, unforgiving and enduring city."

Writer Pete Hamill, director Amy Heckerling, and screenwriter James McBride all appear in the documentary, discussing how a toilet becomes a terlet, and why New Yorkers eat chawclate and drink cawfee, as well as revealing a few surprising facts such as why there's no such thing as a Brooklyn accent, and why an Italian like Rudy Giuliani talks like an Irishman. If These Knishes Could Talk is premiering tonight at the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival and will also be showing at the Hoboken Film Festival and Midtown's Quad Cinema later this year.

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(author unknown)

Yesterday, on a farm near Gloucester, England, thousands gathered for the annual Cooper's Hill Cheese-Rolling and Wake, continuing a tradition that dates back at least 200 years, despite recent warnings from police. In the event, groups of fearless racers risk life and limb chasing an 8 pound (3.5 kg) round of Double Gloucester Cheese down an extremely steep and uneven hill, with a 1:1 gradient in some sections. The last officially organized race was in 2009, since then, it has continued unofficially every year, despite the potential for serious injury. Earlier, local police warned cheese-maker Diana Smart, who has supplied cheese to the race for 25 years, that she may be construed as a race organizer, and therefore legally liable. The BBC reports that this year organizers replaced the cheese with a lightweight foam version, in order to make the race safer. The winner of the race takes home the cheese. [24 photos]

Contestants in the men's race chase a Double Gloucester Cheese down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organized event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)     

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you asked for it, you got it.

second edition of michael jang’s “COLLEGE” available now!

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WIRED UK


Sunrise over a wheat field.

The Knowles Gallery

Researchers have managed to turn indigestible cellulose into starch, a process that could render billions of tons of agricultural waste into food and fuel.

Plants grow more than 160 billion tons of cellulose—the material that makes up the walls of plant cells—every year, but only a tiny fraction of that is useful to humans in the crops we grow. This is frustrating, as cellulose is made up of glucose chains that are almost, but not quite, the same as those that make up the starch that constitutes 20 to 40 percent of most peoples' daily calorie intake.

With the world's population forecast to reach nine billion by 2050, working out how to alter cellulose glucose into something more practical could be vital for preventing starvation. There's also an extra benefit in that some could be used for biofuels.

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w680

Frito-Lay had a formidable research complex near Dallas, where nearly 500 chemists, psychologists and technicians conducted research [...] on questions of crunch, mouth feel and aroma for each of these items. Their tools included a $40,000 device that simulated a chewing mouth to test and perfect the chips, discovering things like the perfect break point: people like a chip that snaps with about four pounds of pressure per square inch.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/magazine/the-extraordinary-science-of-...

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carmendrahl writes "Emergency-room visits linked to caffeine-laden energy drinks are on the rise. This gives scientists who'd like to see caffeine regulated the jitters. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration seems to be dragging its feet on regulating caffeine content in food and drink, because people have different sensitivities to it (abstract). Currently, caffeine-rich products like Monster Energy get around the rules because they're marketed as dietary supplements. 'Caffeine gets cleared from the body at different rates because of genetic variations, gender, and even whether a person is a smoker. For this reason, it’s difficult to set a safe limit of daily consumption on the compound. Physiological differences, as well as differences in the way people consume caffeine, have tied FDA in knots as it has debated how to regulate the substance. ... The toxic level in humans, about 10 g, is roughly the equivalent of imbibing 75 cups of brewed coffee (in 8-oz mugs) or 120 cans of Red Bull over a few hours. But that lethal limit can vary widely from person to person, experts say."

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