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 Sandy Kim, who takes great photos in the process of documenting the kind of carefree life your parents always worried you&#8217;d have, is having an art show at the Ever Gold Gallery. She&#8217;ll be showing all new work, much of which features the aformentioned topless girls (and some dudes, for you girls and you, ahem, San Francisco men). Sandy&#8217;s been taking photos for the magazine for awhile, so she has our stamp of approval. If you need more encouragement, take a gander at these images she sent us that serve as a preview of the show. C&#8217;mon, San Francisco! It&#8217;ll be fun!<br />
Opening for Sandy KimSeptember 5, 7-10 PMEver Gold Gallery441&#160;O’Farrell StSan Francisco, CA, 94102evergoldgallery.com(415) 796-3676<br />
More of Sandy&#8217;s work

If you live in San Francisco and like photography, topless girls, or having a good time, you have only one place to be tonight: Sandy Kim, who takes great photos in the process of documenting the kind of carefree life your parents always worried you’d have, is having an art show at the Ever Gold Gallery. She’ll be showing all new work, much of which features the aformentioned topless girls (and some dudes, for you girls and you, ahem, San Francisco men). Sandy’s been taking photos for the magazine for awhile, so she has our stamp of approval. If you need more encouragement, take a gander at these images she sent us that serve as a preview of the show. C’mon, San Francisco! It’ll be fun!

Opening for Sandy Kim
September 5, 7-10 PM
Ever Gold Gallery
441 O’Farrell St
San Francisco, CA, 94102
evergoldgallery.com
(415) 796-3676

More of Sandy’s work

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google busIt's become common practice for Silicon Valley-based tech firms, like Google, Apple, and Facebook, to shuttle its employees to and from work on Wi-Fi equipped private buses with cushy, leather seats.

But Rebecca Solnit recently argued that these buses are partly to blame for gentrification, mass displacements, and increased housing costs.

There are more than 1,700 tech companies in San Francisco, which employ about 44,000 people. 

Not everyone rides these buses, but those that do are making the housing hunt in San Francisco increasingly more difficult. 

"At the actual open houses, dozens of people who looked like students would show up with chequebooks and sheaves of resumés and other documents and pack the house, literally: it was like a cross between being at a rock concert without a band and the Hotel Rwanda," Solnit writes. "There were rumours that these young people were starting bidding wars, offering a year’s rent in advance, offering far more than was being asked. These rumours were confirmed."

In several neighborhoods throughout San Francisco, rent has gone up between 10 and 135 percent over the past year, Solnit writes. 

More people and small businesses are also facing evictions because they're getting ousted by tech executives and employees, Solnit writes. 

In short, San Francisco has become increasingly unaffordable and the rising costs of living are driving out a lot of people. 

"Sometimes the Google Bus just seems like one face of Janus-headed capitalism; it contains the people too valuable even to use public transport or drive themselves," Solnit writes. "In the same spaces wander homeless people undeserving of private space, or the minimum comfort and security; right by the Google bus stop on Cesar Chavez Street immigrant men from Latin America stand waiting for employers in the building trade to scoop them up, or to be arrested and deported by the government."

SEE ALSO: Here's A Map To Silicon Valley's Cushy Private Buses

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Light Pollution: John Garrett at TEDxTemecula

John Garrett uses his skills as a graphic artist and photographer and his wry sense of humor to teach local schoolchildren and community groups about astronomy. As vice president of the Temecula Valley Astronomers, he gives presentations in Temecula, Murrieta, Wildomar, and Menifee. His topics range from atmospheric optics to light pollution, climate, common observing, archeoastronomy, and exoplanets. A regular presenter at the Julian Starfest, John appreciates the Temecula Valley's proximity to the Palomar Observatory and works with the International Dark-Sky Association to help keep our traditionally rural skies dark enough for star gazing. If you can have the nighttime lighting you need for safety and security, and can still see the stars, would you take both? We can have a dark sky and a well lit ground by fixing design flaws that make many lights a nuisance, a glare hazard, and a waste of energy. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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New York: Night and Day from Philip Stockton on Vimeo. By shooting locations during the day and then again at night, Stockton uses digital rotoscoping techniques to combine the footage and create snippets of daily life that defy time. Truly worth checking out in full-screen.

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Silicon Valley commuter bus route

Taking the bus isn't usually considered a luxury. But Silicon Valley companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, eBay, and Electronic Arts transport their employees to and from work, no matter where they live in San Francisco, on Wi-Fi equipped private buses with cushy, leather seats. 

San Francisco-based design firm Stamen Design tracked those companies' bus routes to figure out where their employees live and how many people rely on those private corporate buses, Geoffrey Fowler of the Wall Street Journal reports.

Stamen mapped out the routes to better understand the connection between San Francisco and Silicon Valley.

"Historically, workers have lived in residential suburbs while commuting to work in the city," the Stamen blog states. "For Silicon Valley, however, the situation is reversed: many of the largest technology companies are based in suburbs, but look to recruit younger knowledge workers who are more likely to dwell in the city."

That understanding of Silicon Valley's topsy-turvy urban geography is itself a bit outdated. When Google pioneered the buses a decade ago, a few hundred employees rode them. Since then, companies like Salesforce.com, Twitter, and Zynga, as well as countless startups have sprung up in San Francisco. What started out as a nice productivity-boosting perk has become an essential weapon for companies based 30 to 40 miles away from San Francisco to court employees.

Regardless, the buses remain popular and essential. Since the routes aren't marked, Stamen utilized Foursquare, the location check-in service, and Field Papers, an online mapping tool, to find the locations for some of the bus stops. Members of the Stamen team also took turns camping out at one of the known Google bus stops on 18th Street in San Francisco. The company even hired bike messengers to follow and track the buses. 

Stamen's research estimated that the buses transport roughly 7,500 tech employees a day, Monday through Friday, and concluded that the unmarked buses ferry a third as many commuters as ride on Caltrain, a commuter train that travels between San Francisco and San Jose. 

Stamen founder Eric Rodenbeck told Fowler that he expected the majority of traffic to come from the Mission District, a young, hip neighborhood in San Francisco, and was surprised to see how much traffic came from other parts of the city. 

"That's a conversation about citywide change," he told Fowler. "Is the city a place where valuable work can happen, or is it just a bedroom for Silicon Valley?"

If you live in the Bay Area, you can visit the "Seeking Silicon Valley" exhibit at the Zero1 Biennial in San Jose until December 8. You can also check out more information about the study on Stamen's blog

 

Silicon Valley commuter bus route 

 

Don't miss: Bravo's 'Start-Ups: Silicon Valley' Shows Geeks Just Want To Have Fun, And That's Simply Not Allowed >

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