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Photographer Damir Sagolj won second place in the multimedia story section of the POYi awards for this piece on the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011.

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Click here to read Fukushima Ghost Towns

On March 11, a devastating earthquake and tsunami rocked Japan. In its wake, the country's Northeast was ravaged. Buildings and lives were destroyed and lost. More »

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Buildings remain vacant and streets deserted inside the 20km (12 mile) radius exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The March 2011 tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, leading to the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years.

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Japan is no stranger to catastrophe. From the near-constant sequence of storms and earthquakes that have buffeted these vulnerable islands to the unthinkable that unfolded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Japanese have seen their land leveled, rebuilt and leveled again. But the earthquake and tsunami that struck northern Japan this March were unique in their ferocity, their suddenness and the extent of their destructive power.

Eight months later, the cleanup is well under way, but those who wish to bear witness to the raw wound that was northern Japan in the wake of the tsunami should see the photo collection ATOKATA, just published by the Tokyo-born photographer Kishin Shinoyama. Shinoyama brought his camera to the scene within weeks of the tsunami, and he captures a land ripped apart. Stunned tree limbs, twisted metal and shattered stone bear witness to the moment when, as Shinoyama writes, “nature destroyed itself with an overwhelming energy.”

Yet even in Shinoyama’s dire images there is a hint of recovery. Disaster is in the Japanese DNA—but so is resilience.

Kishin Shinoyama is a photographer based in Japan. ATOKATA was published November 21.

Bryan Walsh is a senior writer at TIME. Follow him on Twitter at @bryanrwalsh.

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IGDA Japan is organising the Fukushima Game Jam to help stimulate game development following the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan last year.

The Game Jam is organised in conjunction with 9Leap, a student development contest, and will take place from August 27 to 28 in Minami-Souma city.

The event is modeled on the Global Game Jam hosted by the IGDA each year, in which development teams are given a theme and asked to create a game in a limited amount of time.


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Witness: Disaster in Japan is a documentary produced by National Geographic that shows us a compilation of videos of what happened on the 11th of March. It shows images from the less affected areas like Tokyo or Saitama, as well as images from the most affected areas, devastated by the tsunami, like Miyagi and Fukushima. The documentary is edited so that is shows what happened in a chronological way, since the earthquake strikes until the tsunami hits 20-30 minutes after, depending on the area.

Source: Ajapon

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He was beaten with sticks, his gear smashed and his hand broken, it was then an armed man instructed the mob to kill him. Ahmad fled for his life escaping into a nearby house where he successfully...

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Sirens wailed Friday along a devastated coastline to mark exactly one week since an earthquake and tsunami triggered a nuclear emergency, and the government acknowledged it was slow to respond to the disasters that the prime minister called a “great test for the Japanese people.” Last week’s 9.0 quake and tsunami has left more than [...]

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