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Kowloon Walled City Arcade 1

Kowloon Walled City, the lawless metropolis just outside Hong Kong, was evacuated and destroyed – but there is still one place in the world where it can be experienced almost as it really was, in a safer and more sanitized setting. Visitors to the Kawasaki Warehouse Amusement Game Park located between Tokyo and Yokohama can slip into those dark, virtually airless passages long after their disappearance to get a sense of what it must have been like to live in a packed dystopian city run by the mob.

Kowloon Walled City Arcade 2

David of Randomwire visited Kawasaki to get a glimpse of it himself, revealing a recreation that takes you from a faux-rusted factory exterior into dingy alleyways modeled on those of Kowloon. David describes it as “grimy, devoid of sunlight and complete with a soundtrack to match.”

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NOWNESS have debuted Gold Panda's video for his new single "My Father in Hong Kong 1961". Directed by longtime collaborator Ronni Shendar, the dreamy visuals were shot in Hong Kong and capture myriad aspects of Hong Kong life, "from the mystery of its shoreline to its bustling streets." Taken from forthcoming album Half of Where You Live, the song references Derwin "Gold" Panda's father, who lived in the region when it was under British control. "He was doing military service in HK in the 60s which must have been such a crazy time," he says. "I think he had to give police support on days when there were pro-communist marches." Check out the video above.


www.iamgoldpanda.com

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WSJ Staff

In today’s pictures, performers drape themselves in white in Hong Kong, park workers count puffins in Britain, students graduate from college in Maryland, and more.

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Fragments Of Time (by Daniele Manoli)

“A very personal portrait of Hong Kong shot between 2011 - 2013 featuring the words of my father.”

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There is nowhere else in the world quite like Chungking Mansions, a dilapidated seventeen-story commercial and residential structure in the heart of Hong Kong's tourist district. A remarkably motley group of people call the building home; Pakistani phone stall operators, Chinese guesthouse workers, Nepalese heroin addicts, Indonesian sex workers, and traders and asylum seekers from all over Asia and Africa live and work there--even backpacking tourists rent rooms. In short, it is possibly the most globalized spot on the planet continue

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Part 1 out of 4 of a 1989 German documentary on Hong Kong’s fabled Kowloon Walled City. English Subtitles included.

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The growing population of the world, now estimated to be over 7 billion, marks a global milestone and presents obvious challenges for the planet.  There are extremely densely populated cities and sparsely populated countries.  China is the most populous country with India following closely behind. This post brings together some disparate illustrations of our world as it grows, including scenes from Mong Kok district in Hong Kong, which has the highest population density in the world, with 130,000 per one square kilometer. In Mongolia, the world's least densely populated country,  2.7 million people are spread across an area three times the size of France.  Then there's Out Skerries, a tiny outcropping of rocks off the east coast of Scotland where the population is just 65.  And doing what he can to contribute to that 7 billion global milestone is Ziona, the head of a religious sect called "Chana."  He has 39 wives, 94 children, and 33 grandchildren. The world is an interesting place. -- Paula Nelson  (41 photos total)
Motorists pack a junction during rush hour in Taipei in 2009. Taiwan's capital is notorious for its traffic jams, even though many motorists choose motorcycles and scooters over cars. United Nations analysts warn that population growth increases pollution, deforestation, and climate change. (Nicky Loh/Reuters)

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