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Most months, "We Are Data" would have produced a resigned nod and shake of the head, but people visiting it now have fresh reason to feel like their data is being weaponized against them. PRISM and other revelations weren’t just about what was seen — they were about the fact that when confronted with the leaks, the administration drove home how little it thought of public outrage. Watch Dogs promises a solution — but so far, it’s one that occupies an uncomfortable place between commentary and escapism.

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The intro for yesterday's video interview with Don Marti started out by saying, "Don Marti," says Wikipedia, "is a writer and advocate for free and open source software, writing for LinuxWorld and Linux Today." As we noted, Don has moved on since that description was written. In today's interview he starts by talking about some things venture capitalist Mary Meeker of Kleiner Perkins has said, notably that people only spend 6% of their media-intake time with print, but advertisers spend 23% of their budgets on print ads. To find out why this is, you might want to read a piece Don wrote titled Targeted Advertising Considered Harmful. Or you can just watch today's video -- and if you didn't catch Part One of our video conversation yesterday, you might want to check it out before watching Part 2.

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As we do every year, Dr. Dobb's recognizes the best books of the last 12 months via the Jolt Awards — our cycle of awards given out every two months in one of six categories. Traditionally, no category gets more entrants than books, and this year was no exception with more than 40 nominees submitted by publishers, vendors, and readers. The award covers all books published during the twelve months ending June 30th of this year.

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Starting with templates, Android features can be added quickly with a single line of DSL code.

In the first installment of this two-part series on developing Android Apps with Scala and Scaloid, I explained how Scaloid simplifies and reduces the required Android code as much as possible while leveraging type safety. In this article, I explain how to utilize asynchronous task processing, the execution of methods from system services, and specific Scaloid classes and traits.

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Original author: 
Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange

This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites.

Java developer Stijn Geukens is working with 10 developers, and nearly every dev has his own style. That's about to change, as the company may soon impose a standard code format upon all developers. They'll be using Eclipse to help facilitate the change. But is forcing consistency upon the team more trouble than it's worth? See the original question here.

How professional

ZeroOne answers (39 votes):

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Original author: 
Casey Newton

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Video discovery app ShowYou was created to help users keep track of all the videos being shared across their social networks. But like most video app developers, including the market-leading YouTube, it has struggled to replicate the easy viewing offered on cable, Netflix, and Hulu. Most people prefer to watch a single 30- or 60-minute program than string together shorter clips, even when those clips are professionally produced.

Today ShowYou is trying to change that with an update to its app that lets anyone create a channel of videos, which can be browsed and followed in a manner similar to the curated "magazines" in Flipboard. As with Flipboard, ShowYou’s bigger play is for old-time publishers, trying to help them generate new...

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Original author: 
Bryan Bishop

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David Kwong got his first taste of magic as a young boy in upstate New York. The trick was simple: the magician placed a red sponge ball into the boy’s hand, produced a second one, and then made it vanish. When Kwong opened his hand, there were two balls resting inside.

“I remember turning to my father and saying ‘How did this work?,’” he tells me over coffee in Los Angeles. “And he just gave me that patented sheepish grin and said ‘I have no idea.’”

“And that’s when I knew I had to learn magic.”

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Original author: 
Todd Hoff

Distributed transactions are costly because they use agreement protocols. Calvin says, surprisingly, that using a deterministic database allows you to avoid the use of agreement protocols. The approach is to use a deterministic transaction layer that does all the hard work before acquiring locks and the beginning of transaction execution.

Overview:
Many distributed storage systems achieve high data access throughput via partitioning and replication, each system with its own advantages and tradeoffs. In order to achieve high scalability, however, today’s systems generally reduce transactional support, disallowing single transactions from spanning multiple partitions. Calvin is a practical transaction scheduling and data replication layer that uses a deterministic ordering guarantee to significantly reduce the normally prohibitive contention costs associated with distributed transactions. Unlike previous deterministic database system prototypes, Calvin supports disk-based storage, scales near-linearly on a cluster of commodity machines, and has no single point of failure. By replicating transaction inputs rather than effects, Calvin is also able to support multiple consistency levels—including Paxos based strong consistency across geographically distant replicas—at no cost to transactional throughput.

If you are interested Daniel Abadi gives a very accessible overview of Calvin in If all these new DBMS technologies are so scalable, why are Oracle and DB2 still on top of TPC-C? A roadmap to end their dominance.

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