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call -151 writes "Many years ago, a human-generated intentionally nonsense paper was accepted by the (prominent) literary culture journal Social Text. In August, a randomly-generated nonsense mathematics paper was accepted by one of the many low-tier 'open-access' research mathematics journals. The software Mathgen, which generated the accepted submission, takes as inputs author names (or those can be randomly selected also) and generates nicely TeX'd and impressive-sounding sentences which are grammatically correct but mathematically disconnected nonsense. This was reviewed by a human, (quickly, for math, in 12 days) and the reviewers' comments mention superficial problems with the submission (PDF). The references are also randomly-generated and rather hilarious. For those with concerns about submitting to lower-tier journals in an effort to promote open access, this is not a good sign!"


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An anonymous reader writes "Just Cause 2 Multiplayer has been getting a lot of press lately, but this making-of feature points out how the mod raises serious questions about the games industry: if 1,800-player massively multiplayer action games are possible on one server, why did it take a group of modders to prove it? From the article: 'There’s more chaos to come. That 1,800 player limit isn’t maxing out the server or the software by any means. Foote says that the team, who first met online seven years ago playing the similar Multi Theft Auto GTA mod, are "yet to reach any real barrier or limitation preventing us from reaching an even higher player count than the previous public tests." When it’s ready, the team will release the software for everyone to download and run their own servers, wherever they are in the world.'"


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I am a recent high school graduate, who has been programming in C++ since I was 11. I know x86 Assembler, C/C++ and Java. I won't be learning anything new in CS for the first 2-3 semesters in college. The introduction class, algorithms and data structure classes are prerequisites for the rest of the CS curriculum. I have already taken Data Structures and Algorithms this past year, which was the practical, implementation approach. I am currently watching the algorithms class on MIT OCW to get a grasp of the more theoretical aspects. And I can say that I am understanding it; it's just a bit dry. This summer, I will be watching the multivariable calculus, intro to algorithms and Physics III lectures through MIT OCW. I have had experience in robotics through FIRST; I personally wrote an implemented my interpretations of the PID controller and Kalman Filter, but that's about it. I have followed the first week or two of the Udacity Robot Car class, but never really followed through. What fun thing can I do during summer? Euler's Project is on the list, writing an Android app is on the list. Perhaps, I can really dive into parallel processing through the use of my PS3. But those are all "practical" things.

What can I be doing to learn the more theoretical aspects of CS? To be honest, I really don't know much of what happens on the theoretical side of CS.

submitted by davidthefat
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David Gerard writes "It seems the authors of Stuxnet/Duqu/Flame used the LZO library, which is straight-up GPL. And so, someone has asked the U.S. government to release the code under the GPL. (Other code uses various permissive licenses. As works of the U.S. federal government, the rest is of course public domain.) Perhaps the author could enlist the SFLC to send a copyright notice to the U.S. government..."


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itwbennett writes "The problem: Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) enables routers to communicate about the best path to other networks, but routers don't verify the route 'announcements.' When routing problems erupt, 'it's very difficult to tell if this is fat fingering on a router or malicious,' said Joe Gersch, chief operating officer for Secure64, a company that makes Domain Name System (DNS) server software. In a well-known incident, Pakistan Telecom made an error with BGP after Pakistan's government ordered in 2008 that ISPs block YouTube, which ended up knocking Google's service offline. A solution exists, but it's complex, and deployment has been slow. Now experts have found an easier way."


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I read a few blogs but in general I have no idea what is currently going on in my field of interest (formal methods, static analysis, verification in general). I would like to change that but I have no idea where to start.

How do you decide which papers to read and where do you get them from?

submitted by dkgi
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