Skip navigation
Help

Just-in-time compilation

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Peter Bright

Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock

In a bid to make JavaScript run ever faster, Mozilla has developed asm.js. It's a limited, stripped down subset of JavaScript that the company claims will offer performance that's within a factor of two of native—good enough to use the browser for almost any application. Can JavaScript really start to rival native code performance? We've been taking a closer look.

The quest for faster JavaScript

JavaScript performance became a big deal in 2008. Prior to this, the JavaScript engines found in common Web browsers tended to be pretty slow. These were good enough for the basic scripting that the Web used at the time, but it was largely inadequate for those wanting to use the Web as a rich application platform.

In 2008, however, Google released Chrome with its V8 JavaScript engine. Around the same time, Apple brought out Safari 4 with its Nitro (née Squirrelfish Extreme) engine. These engines brought something new to the world of JavaScript: high performance achieved through just-in-time (JIT) compilation. V8 and Nitro would convert JavaScript into pieces of executable code that the CPU could run directly, improving performance by a factor of three or more.

Read 94 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None


A JVM Does That?

Google Tech Talk (more info below) March 29, 2011 Presented by Cliff Click, Azul Systems. ABSTRACT Just what the heck is a JVM *supposed* to do? JVMs already provide a host of services. The 'J' part definitely slants the service selection and the 'V' part means that underneath the illusion there's a lot of really cruddy stuff. The success of these illusions has led to the real popularity of JVMs. In particular, JVMs are probably the most popular way to distribute ready-to-use GC technology to the masses, and the 2nd most popular way to distribute ready-to-use compilation technology (just behind "gcc" I'm guessing). Just what are these illusions? The illusion that bytecodes are fast and have a reasonable cost model : (machine code generation, profiling, JIT'ing). The illusion that you can quickly change the program at any time (dynamic class loading, deoptimization, re-JIT'ing). The illusion of infinite memory (Garbage Collection). The illusion of a consistent threading and memory model (the JMM, volatiles, locks). The illusion of quick time access (ie Intel's "rdtsc" is mostly useless for time). The illusion that these other illusions all work on all sorts of machines from cell phones to 1000-cpu mainframes (it's kinda sorta mostly true). But these are not enough! The People cry out for more illusions! The illusion of an Infinite Stack (tail recursion), the illusion that running-code-is-data (closures), the illusion that Integers are as cheap as 'ints' (autoboxing <b>...</b>
From:
GoogleTechTalks
Views:
21154

184
ratings
Time:
52:38
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None