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Original author: 
r_adams

Moving from physical servers to the "cloud" involves a paradigm shift in thinking. Generally in a physical environment you care about each invididual host; they each have their own static IP, you probably monitor them individually, and if one goes down you have to get it back up ASAP. You might think you can just move this infrastructure to AWS and start getting the benefits of the "cloud" straight away. Unfortunately, it's not quite that easy (believe me, I tried). You need think differently when it comes to AWS, and it's not always obvious what needs to be done.

So, inspired by Sehrope Sarkuni's recent post, here's a collection of AWS tips I wish someone had told me when I was starting out. These are based on things I've learned deploying various applications on AWS both personally and for my day job. Some are just "gotcha"'s to watch out for (and that I fell victim to), some are things I've heard from other people that I ended up implementing and finding useful, but mostly they're just things I've learned the hard way.

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This is a guest post written by Claude Johnson, a Lead Site Reliability Engineer at salesforce.com.

The following is an architectural overview of salesforce.com’s core platform and applications. Other systems such as Heroku's Dyno architecture or the subsystems of other products such as work.com and do.com are specifically not covered by this material, although database.com is. The idea is to share with the technology community some insight about how salesforce.com does what it does. Any mistakes or omissions are mine.

This is by no means comprehensive but if there is interest, the author would be happy to tackle other areas of how salesforce.com works. Salesforce.com is interested in being more open with the technology communities that we have not previously interacted with. Here’s to the start of “Opening the Kimono” about how we work.

Since 1999, salesforce.com has been singularly focused on building technologies for business that are delivered over the Internet, displacing traditional enterprise software. Our customers pay via monthly subscription to access our services anywhere, anytime through a web browser. We hope this exploration of the core salesforce.com architecture will be the first of many contributions to the community.

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SPDY adds a session layer atop of SSL that allows for multiple concurrent, interleaved streams over a single TCP connection. 

The usual HTTP GET and POST message formats remain the same; however, SPDY specifies a new framing format for encoding and transmitting the data over the wire.

 

Streams are bi-directional, i.e. can be initiated by the client and server. 

SPDY aims to achieve lower latency through basic (always enabled) and advanced (optionally enabled) features.

Basic features

    • Multiplexed streams

    SPDY allows for unlimited concurrent streams over a single TCP connection. Because requests are interleaved on a single channel, the efficiency of TCP is much higher: fewer network connections need to be made, and fewer, but more densely packed, packets are issued.

    • Request prioritization

      Although unlimited parallel streams solve the serialization problem, they introduce another one: if bandwidth on the channel is constrained, the client may block requests for fear of clogging the channel. To overcome this problem, SPDY implements request priorities: the client can request as many items as it wants from the server, and assign a priority to each request. This prevents the network channel from being congested with non-critical resources when a high priority request is pending. 

    • HTTP header compression

    SPDY compresses request and response HTTP headers, resulting in fewer packets and fewer bytes transmitted.

    Advanced features

    In addition, SPDY provides an advanced feature, server-initiated streams. Server-initiated streams can be used to deliver content to the client without the client needing to ask for it. This option is configurable by the web developer in two ways:

    • Server push. 

    SPDY experiments with an option for servers to push data to clients via the X-Associated-Content header. This header informs the client that the server is pushing a resource to the client before the client has asked for it.  For initial-page downloads (e.g. the first time a user visits a site), this can vastly enhance the user experience.

    • Server hint

    Rather than automatically pushing resources to the client, the server uses the X-Subresources header to suggest to the client that it should ask for specific resources, in cases where the server knows in advance of the client that those resources will be needed. However, the server will still wait for the client request before sending the content.  Over slow links, this option can reduce the time it takes for a client to discover it needs a resource by hundreds of milliseconds, and may be better for non-initial page loads.

    For technical details, see the SPDY draft protocol specification

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    eldavojohn writes "As a web developer in the 'Agile' era, I find myself making (or recognizing) more and more important decisions being made in developing for the web. Scalability Rules cemented and codified a lot of things I had suspected or picked up from blogs but failed to give much more thought to and had difficulty defending as a member of a team. A simple example is that I knew state is bad if unneeded but I couldn't quite define why. Scalability Rules Read below for the rest of eldavojohn's review.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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    Question: Can you give me more information on how to set up MySQL cluster?

    Answer: Sure, below are the links to extremely informative Internet resources providing detailed guides on why and how to deploy MySQL cluster.

    By the way a cluster in IT field is a group of linked computers, working together so they form a single computing system. The components of a cluster are usually connected to each other via fast local area networks. Clusters are usually deployed to improve performance and/or availability over that provided by a single computer, while typically being much more cost-effective than single computers of comparable speed or availability.

    1. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-cluster.html

    MySQL Cluster is a high-availability, high-redundancy version of MySQL adapted for the distributed computing environment. It uses the NDBCLUSTER storage engine to enable running several MySQL servers in a cluster. This storage engine is available in MySQL 5.0 binary releases and in RPMs compatible with most modern Linux distributions.

    2. Mysql Cluster: The definitive HOWTO

    3. How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster

    This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

    4. MySQL Cluster Server Setup

    MySQL Cluser Server is a fault-tolerant, redundant, scalable database architecture built on the open-source MySQL application, and capable of delivering 99.999% reliability. In this paper we describe the process we used to setup, configure, and test a three-node mySQL cluster server in a test environment.

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