Skip navigation
Help

Mark Zuckerberg

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Tim Carmody

Install1_large

Answering questions after today's Facebook Home event, Mark Zuckerberg was full of praise for Google's smartphone platform. "We think that Google takes their commitment to openness in the ecosystem really seriously," he said, regarding the possibility Google might try to lock out Facebook. Google, he said, was aware of Facebook's work, although wasn't a partner like a host of other industry players. "I actually think this is really good for Android," he added, setting up a gentle dig. "Most app developers put most of their energy into iPhone."

Meanwhile, Zuckerberg confirmed that Facebook Home is essentially an end-run around Google's services wherever they compete directly with Facebook's, with the ultimate goal of capturing more...

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

Nerval's Lobster writes "Software developer Jeff Cogswell is back with an extensive under-the-hood breakdown of Facebook's Graph Search, trying to see if peoples' privacy concerns about the social network's search engine are entirely justified. His conclusion? 'Some of the news articles I've read talk about how Graph Search will start small and slowly grow as it accumulates more information. This is wrong—Graph Search has been accumulating information since the day Facebook opened and the first connections were made in the internal graph structure,' he writes. 'People were nervous about Google storing their history, but it pales in comparison to the information Facebook already has on you, me, and roughly a billion other people.' There's much more at the link, including a handy breakdown of graph theory."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None

party, teenagers, club, dance, wild, fun

A new dating app called Tinder was recently brought to our attention.

A "normal" person at Business Insider told us about it, and said all of her roommates and college-age friends use it. A few have found dates on it.

(By "normal," we mean someone who isn't gadget obsessed, and isn't an early tech adopter.)

What is Tinder?

It's more or less a socially acceptable, mobile version of Hot or Not. If you saw The Social Network, you might remember "Face Mash," the product Mark Zuckerberg made before Facebook. It takes people's photos and lets other people quickly say if they find the person attractive or unattractive.

But Tinder is Hot or Not or Face Mash with a purpose. Instead of rating people for cruel amusement, it helps you find single people you're attracted to in your area.

If you're attracted to them, and they're attracted to you, both parties are notified. If one of you is attracted and the other isn't, neither is notified. And of course, if both parties don't' find each other attractive, they both go on their ways, never knowing what the other thinks.

Tinder was founded by four entrepreneurs Sean Rad, Justin Mateen, Jonathan Badeen, and Christopher Gulczynski, and it is backed by IAC, the parent company of Match and OKCupid. It recently launched on a few college campuses and it seems to be making the rounds. According to TechCrunch, more than 35 million profiles have been rated on the app and one million matches have been made in less than two months. 

We wanted to know what all the fuss was about. So we downloaded it and gave it a try. Here goes.

When you open the app, it welcomes you with basic instructions.

If you like someone and they like you, it's a match! You're then allowed to message each other. If not, you go on your merry way.

If you're worried about privacy, Tinder assures you your picks are safe and private.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

Please follow SAI: Tools on Twitter and Facebook.

0
Your rating: None