Skip navigation
Help

Measuring instruments

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.



Whenever I start my Toyota Prius, I note one number above all else. It's not the time, not the odometer, not even the gas left in the tank. My eyes go straight to the car's average miles per gallon since last fill-up. If I don't exit our vehicle with that number higher than what my wife left it, I have failed. Driving has become a game—and by playing it, I save money and conserve energy.

If only my competitive streak led to greater efficiencies in my far more significant uses of energy: the electricity and gas that light and heat our home. Instead, we live in the dark (figuratively speaking, of course). Our appliances offer no hint of how much electricity they use; my furnace and its associated ductwork operate at some unknown level of efficiency. Monthly bills provide no breakdown of where and when the energy went.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post

0
Your rating: None

Harperdog writes "Gabrielle Hecht has an interesting piece on the subcontracted workers of the nuclear energy industry, in Japan and elsewhere. These workers face far more exposure to radiation than salaried workers; in Japan, 90% of the nuclear workforce is contracted. This is an eye-opening look at a practice that 'carries exceptional risks and implications. And until these are recognized and documented, complex social and physiological realities will continue to be hidden.' A good read, but I would like to know how the Fukushima 50 are doing."



Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None


Sensor Fusion on Android Devices: A Revolution in Motion Processing

Google Tech Talk August 2, 2010 ABSTRACT Presented by David Sachs. Gyroscopes, accelerometers, and compasses are increasingly prevalent in mainstream consumer electronics. Applications of these sensors include user interface, augmented reality, gaming, image stabilization, and navigation. This talk will demonstrate how all three sensor types work separately and in conjunction on a modified Android handset running a modified sensor API, then explain how algorithms are used to enable a multitude of applications. Application developers who wish to make sense of rotational motion must master Euler angles, rotation matrices, and quaternions. Under the hood, sensor fusion algorithms must be used in order to create responsive, accurate, and low noise descriptions of motion. Reducing sensing errors involves compensating for temperature changes, magnetic disturbances, and sharp accelerations. Some of these algorithms must run at a very high rate and with very precise timing, which makes them difficult to implement within low-power real-time operating systems. Within Android specifically, this involves modifying the sensor manager, introducing new APIs, and partitioning motion processing tasks. David Sachs began developing motion processing systems as a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab. His research there led him to InvenSense, where he continues this work with MEMS inertial sensors used in products such as the Nintendo Wii Motion Plus. David's designs incorporate gyroscopes <b>...</b>
From:
GoogleTechTalks
Views:
3367

42
ratings
Time:
46:27
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None