Skip navigation
Help

Memory

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Have you ever misremembered an event, while being totally certain it actually happened? Most people have experienced the unreliability of human memory. As it turns out, false memories are very easy to generate. Scientists at the Riken–MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics have created false memories in mice using a procedure they say would also work for humans.

0
Your rating: None

crudelyerased6FINAL

Have you ever been lost in a shopping mall as a kid? Gone to Disneyland and shook Mickey's hand? You probaby just imagined it. False memories, in which you believe an imagined or distorted memory to be fact, are more common than people think. They constitute a neurological no man's land where the brain's creative capacity for reimagination collides with the grotesque flotsam of the subconscious, creating a memory that blurs the line between real and unreal.

For the past nine months, experimental artist and Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow A.R. Hopwood has been crowdsourcing examples of this phenomenon for The False Memory Archive. Hundreds of these accounts, along with video and photographic work inspired by false memories, will be displayed as part of the touring exhibition that will, appropriately enough, culminate in a show at the Freud Museum.

0
Your rating: None

Henry Gustave Molaison was a man who couldn't make memories. Better known to neuroscientists as "HM", the late Molaison suffered from seizures as a young man and struggled to lead a normal life, but things took a dramatic shift after he received a lobotomy in August 1953. Doctors removed large chunks of HM's temporal lobes and most of his hippocampus, on the assumption that these regions were responsible for the patient's neurological problems. The operation did cure HM's seizures, but it left him in a unique case of anterograde amnesia; he could remember his childhood and his personality remained unchanged, but he could not form new memories.

As Steven Shapin writes in a piece for the New Yorker this week, the operation left HM in a constant state of discovery and confusion, but it also gave scientists remarkable new insight into how the brain processes and stores memory.

"The operation could not have been better designed if the intent had been to create a new kind of experimental object that showed where in the brain memory lived," Shapin writes. "Molaison gave scientists a way to map cognitive functions onto brain structures. It became possible to subdivide memory into different types and to locate their cerebral Zip Codes."

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Soulskill

New submitter einar2 writes "German hoster Hetzner informed customers that login data for their admin surface might have been compromised (Google translation of German original). At the end of last week, a backdoor in a monitoring server was found. Closer examination led to the discovery of a rootkit residing in memory. The rootkit does not touch files on storage but patches running processes in memory. Malicious code is directly injected into running processes. According to Hetzner the attack is surprisingly sophisticated."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
By JAMES ESTRIN

Haunted by memories of his father's long hospitalization for depression, Johan Willner turned his childhood visions into photographic tableaux.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
John Timmer

Arthur Toga, University of California, Los Angeles

In 1992, at the age of 70, a US citizen suffered a severe case of viral encephalitis, a swelling of the brain caused by infection. After he recovered two years later, he appeared completely average based on an IQ test (indeed, he scored 103). Yet in other ways, he was completely different. Several decades of his past life were wiped completely from his brain. His only accessible memories came from his 30s, and from the point of his illness to his death, he would never form another memory that he was aware of.

But this severe case of what appears to be total amnesia doesn't mean he had no memory as we commonly understand it. The patient, called E.P., was studied intensely using a battery of tests for more than a decade, with researchers giving him tests during hundreds of sessions. After his death, his brain was given for further study. With the analysis of the brain complete, the people who studied him have taken the opportunity to publish a review of all his complex memory problems.

Aside from memory, there were only a few obvious problems with E.P. Most of his senses were normal except smell, which was wiped out (a condition called anosmia). His vision was perfectly fine, but he had two specific problems interpreting what he saw. One was a limited ability to discriminate between faces, and the other was difficulty in determining whether a line drawing represented an object that's physically impossible (think M. C. Escher drawings).

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None


"Thanks for the memories, but I'd prefer a bite to eat."

UFL.edu

As the organ responsible for maintaining equilibrium in the body and the most energy-demanding of all the organs, the brain takes a lot of the body's energy allocation. So when food is in short supply, the brain is the organ that is fed first. But what happens when there isn’t enough food to fulfill the high-energy needs of the brain and survival is threatened?

The brain does not simply self-allocate available resources on the fly; instead it “trims the fat” by turning off entire processes that are too costly. Researchers from CNRS in Paris created a true case of do-or-die, starving flies to the point where they must choose between switching off costly memory formation or dying. When flies are starved, their brains will block the formation of aversive long-term memories, which depend on costly protein synthesis and require repetitive learning.

But that doesn't mean all long-term memories are shut down. Appetitive long-term memories, which can be formed after a single training, are enhanced during a food shortage.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None

Spaun artificial brain

Researchers across the world continue to make advances towards using technology to mimic the human brain, and scientists at the University of Waterloo have created their own functioning model that can even pass the kind of basic questions that appear on a standard IQ test. Known as Spaun — Semantic Pointer Architecture Unified Network — the artificial brain uses a supercomputer to model 2.5 million neurons (by way of comparison, the human brain is thought to have up to 100 billion neurons). Spaun features an electronic "eye" that lets it receive input in the form of 28 x 28-pixel images, and uses a robotic arm to scrawl its answers on paper.

At the moment Spaun can perform eight different pre-defined taks, including counting number...

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None