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Modern art

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Regine

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While emphasizing the multiple correspondences between collectives and groups like Arte Povera, Archizoom, Superstudio, and figures such as Ettore Sottsass and Alessandro Mendini, The Italian Avant-Garde: 1968-1976 also highlights previously overlooked spaces, works, and performances generated by Zoo, Gruppo 9999, and Cavart. Newly commissioned interviews and essays by historians and curators shed light on the era, while contemporary practitioners discuss its complex legacy continue

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For more than 30 years, artist John Stezaker has used found images as his primary medium. In his compositions, black-and-white studio portraits become surreal two-faced beings; elsewhere, a woman’s face is replaced by the crashing white waves of an illustrated postcard. These collages, which use classic movie stills, vintage postcards and book illustrations, are sliced and re-arranged into entirely new forms—they’re simple constructions, but Stezaker’s eye for the uncanny makes them powerful.

On Sept. 3, Stezaker was awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, which recognizes a significant contribution to the medium of photography through exhibition or publication, for his presentation of photographic collages last year at the Whitechapel Gallery in London.

The £30,000 prize (about $48,000) is organized by The Photographers’ Gallery in London. “Stezaker’s work has been influential on a new generation of image-makers,” said Brett Rogers, the Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, in a statement. “Within the vastness of today’s image flow, Stezaker has managed to resurrect the power and uncanny mystery inherent in the still image using traditional photographic strategies, most especially collage.”

Stezaker’s exhibition at Whitechapel showcased work from the 1970s until today.

“I am dedicated to fascination—to image fascination, a fascination for the point at which the image becomes self-enclosed and autonomous. It does so through a series of processes of disjunction,” Stezaker said in a statement from Whitechapel.

John Stezaker is a London-based artist. See more of his work here.

An exhibition of the artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 is on display at The Photographers’ Gallery, London until Sept. 9.

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Deutche-borse-list

This year’s Deutche Börse Photography Prize exhibition opens tommorrow – July 13 – at London’s Photographers’ Gallery. The annual competition was was founded in 1996 by the gallery and since 2005 had run in collaboration with the Deutche Börse Group (hence the name). It aims to reward £30,000 to a contemporary photographer of any nationality who has made the most significant contribution to photography this past year – either in the contexts of publication or exhibition.

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Gallery-of-lost-art-lead

Tate Media has just launched an ultra-absorbing online exhibition entitled The Gallery of Lost Art. It showcases, in great detail, the numerous significant artworks of the past century that have been stolen, destroyed, rejected, or have simply disappeared. The project, which kicked off today, will run for an entire year – with new items being added each week. Curated by the Tate and designed by ISO Design, its interface provides the user with a view of a grey warehouse floor-space, with different ephemera laid out on widely set apart desks, and stenciled typography categorising works by the manner in which it was lost. It features any surviving images of the works under discussion, along with fascinating essays on the circumstances that led to their disappearance.

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Influenced by surrealism and Dada as well as constructivism, collage was firmly established as an art form in the 1920s and 1930s through the work of artists such as John Heartfield, El Lissitzky, and Hannah Höch. A new title from Gestalten, Cutting Edges showcases a fresh generation of young artists and illustrators using photo-based media in collage.

Curated by artist James Gallagher, starting from his personal collection, Cutting Edges is a selection of current artwork that unites unrelated elements to create something new. Although the artists also use the computer for the purpose of montage, most of the featured collages are made by hand and often include found objects and photographs.


Virginia Echeverria, untitled


Randi Antonsen, “How to Read a Magazine”


Mario Wagner, “Learning”


Célio Braga, untitled


Jelle Martens, “Natuur”


David Wallace, “Lost”


Virginia Echeverria, untitled

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Art historian Diana Poulsen takes a closer look at the "are games art?" discussion, bringing in an academic perspective steeped in knowledge of games to help untangle the thorny question of what art, precisely, is, and what relationship games have with it.

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