Skip navigation
Help

Mozilla Firefox

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

If you want to participate in today's Internet, and all the apps and services that go with it, you have two choices: Accept that your information is out there and try not to worry about it, or arm yourself with some privacy protection tools. Should you choose the latter path, check out these apps and services to help you stay anonymous online and keep your information out of the wrong hands.

0
Your rating: None

Collusion for Chrome

Disconnect, the team behind privacy extensions like Facebook, Twitter, and Google Disconnect, has traditionally focused on stopping sites from sending your data back to social networks and other collection entities. These sites, however, aren't the only ones getting information from your browsing, and a new Disconnect tool, "Collusion for Chrome," will chart a map of where exactly your clicks are going.

That name ought to sound familiar — it's the same as an experimental Firefox extension that Mozilla created several weeks ago. On Firefox, Collusion opens a new, almost blank tab. As you browse, the tab adds a circle for each site, then sniffs out where that data is going. Within a few clicks, you're likely to have a tangled web linked...

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

A handful of the many screens your site needs to handle. Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired.com

Responsive design means making your website readable no matter what screen it might be on. In the words of karate master Bruce Lee, “Don’t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water.” Lee may have been talking about your mind, but his words apply just as well to your website. To paraphrase the rest of that quote, you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup; so, you put your content on a tablet, it becomes the tablet; you put it on a TV, it becomes the TV.”

On a more practical level, achieving a Bruce Lee-like command of the fluid web means ditching the pixels and points for flexible units like ems or percentages. There’s a lot more to responsive design than just fluid layouts, but it’s definitely a key part of the process.

Curiously, when it comes time to use the other universal element of responsive design — the @media query that applies the actual responsive design — most of us revert right back to pixels with something like @media all and (min-width: 500px) {}. It seems logical; after all, you’re trying to fit your content into a window with specific dimensions, so why not use pixels?

Certainly you can, and most sites we’ve seen up to this point use pixels for the actual media query breakpoints, but it’s worth noting that you can use ems here as well.

Lyza Gardner over at Cloud Four recently posted a look at why Cloud Four’s new responsive design uses ems in its media queries. Here’s her reasoning for Cloud Four’s em-based approach:

Folks who design for traditional reading media — where the content really is king — don’t center design decisions around the absolute width of content-holding elements so much as around the optimal line lengths for the content they’re flowing. There are some tried-and-true numbers one can shoot for that make for the “right” number of letters (and thus words) per line for comfortable human reading.

Thus actual column width is a function of font size and ems-per-line.

The rest of the post walks through how Cloud Four used em-based media queries to create a better navigation experience on their site. Some of the advantages may not apply to every responsive design, but there is one additional benefit that works nearly everywhere — em-based media queries mean that your site will handle user zooming much better, applying media queries instead of allowing content to overflow its container.

But perhaps the best part of an em-based approach is that it seems to work in nearly every web browser. Cloud Four’s post doesn’t get into the specifics of their browser testing so I fired up a couple of virtual machines and tested their site and my own simplified demo page in every major browser.

According to my testing, em-based media queries work properly in all OS X browsers. (I tested the latest versions of Safari, Firefox, Chrome and Opera.) Only Firefox and Opera apply media queries on zoom, though. (Chrome and Safari need a page refresh before the query is applied.)

On Windows 7 Firefox, Opera and Chrome behave the same way they do on OS X. IE 9 also worked fine and, like Firefox and Opera, applies media queries when zooming without needing a page refresh. Judging by the comments on the Cloud Four blog, Chrome on Linux may have some issues, but in my testing Firefox and Chrome on Fedora worked as expected.

All the mobile browsers I tested on Android worked as well (Firefox, Chrome, Opera Mini and the default Android browser). On iOS Mobile Safari applies em-based queries as you would expect.

In the end you certainly don’t need to use em-based media queries. As many sites out there demonstrate, pixel-based queries work. At least for now. However, as a wider range of screen sizes begin to access the web switching to em-based queries may put you ahead of the game. Em-based queries mean addressing the content-width rather than just the screen width and that feels like a more future-friendly approach.

0
Your rating: None

The new 3-D Inspector: Your pages, in three dimensions.

Mozilla has released Firefox 11, adding some new developer tools, support for the SPDY protocol and the ability to sync your add-ons between computers.

This release is not recommended for drummers, but everyone else can grab Firefox 11 from the official Firefox download page, or you can just wait for the automated update system to work its magic.

The big news in this release is the new add-on syncing tool. Firefox Sync has long handled syncing bookmarks, preferences, passwords, history and open tabs across computers, but until now syncing add-ons was an entirely manual process. Add-on syncing has been a feature request for Firefox Sync pretty much since syncing was announced in 2010, but until to day it wasn’t available.

If you’d like to include add-ons in the list of items synced, just open up Firefox’s preference panel, head to the sync tab and check the new add-ons option.

Firefox 11 also has some new features for web developers, including the Tilt 3-D code inspector. Derived from the Tilt plug-in, the 3-D code inspector is a WebGL-based visualization of the page’s DOM and HTML structure. When you select “inspect element” Firefox will bring up a breadcrumb-style menu bar at the bottom of the page. In Firefox 11 you’ll find that a new button “3D” has joined the HTML and Style buttons in the page inspector menu bar.

This release adds a new Style Editor to Firefox’s developer toolkit. The Style Editor offers a two-pane view for browsing all of a webpage’s styles, both inline and external stylesheets. The right-hand pane displays the styles as plain text (with syntax highlighting), while the left pane shows the list of all your style sources. Make changes to the stylesheet and your changes are reflected on the webpage in real time. When you’ve got things looking the way you’d like you can then save the modified stylesheet.

If the new developer features convince you to switch back from Chrome, you’ll be glad to know that Firefox can now migrate your bookmarks, history, and cookies directly from Google Chrome.

Other new features in Firefox 11 include preliminary support for SPDY, Google’s alternative to the ubiquitous HTTP protocol. SPDY, pronounced “speedy,” isn’t quite ready for prime time yet in Firefox and is disabled by default. But if you’d like to test it out (Twitter is using SPDY where possible, as is Google) head to about:config and set network.http.spdy.enabled to true.

With Firefox 11 officially released, Firefox 12 moves to the beta channel and Firefox 13 to the Aurora channel. As of this writing, those channels don’t appear to have been updated just yet, but if you’re using either expect an update to arrive in the next day or two.

0
Your rating: None



Standards-based open Web technologies are increasingly capable of delivering interactive multimedia experiences; the kind that used to only be available through plugins or native applications. This trend is creating new opportunities for gaming on the Web.

New standards are making it possible for Web applications to implement 3D graphics, handle input from gamepad peripherals, capture and process audio and video in real-time, display graphical elements in a fullscreen window, and use threading for parallelization. Support for mobile gaming has also gotten a boost from features like device orientation APIs and improved support for handling touchscreen interaction.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post

0
Your rating: None

waderoush writes "For many startup entrepreneurs, getting acquired by Google is the dream exit. But these days Google is getting a lot more discriminating about what kinds of companies it buys — and a lot more careful about how it integrates newly acquired teams. This article offers an in-depth look at how Google achieves a two-thirds success rate with acquisitions, and why things still occasionally go south. 'The return on our acquisition dollars has been extraordinary,' says vice president of business development David Lawee, Google's M&A czar. But Google insiders say it still takes a lot of work to make sure acquired startups go the way of Android (the mobile operating system, acquired in 2005) and not Aardvark (the social search site, acquired in 2010 and shut down in 2011)."


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None

Photo: Vinoth Chandar/Flickr/CC

Ever wonder who’s tracking your online movements — watching the sites you visit, the links you click and the items you buy? Unless you’ve already taken active steps to stop the tracking, the answer is just about everyone.

Privacy advocates have been working to help raise awareness of the extent to which we are all tracked online. Browser makers like Mozilla have also been working to make consumers aware of what’s happening behind the scenes on the web. Mozilla created and popularized the Do Not Track header, which has now been adopted by all the major browsers. Firefox’s parent company also recently showed off its Collusion add-on as part of the TED 2012 conference.

Collusion is a Firefox add-on that helps you see exactly who is tracking your movements online. It doesn’t stop sites from tracking you, but after Collusion shows you what happens when you browse the web without any tracking protection, you’ll probably want to find something that can stop sites from tracking you.

Not all web tracking is bad. Some services rely on user data to function. For example, if you use Facebook and want to use the company’s ubiquitous Like buttons, Facebook needs to set cookies and keep track of who you are. The problem Mozilla wants to address with Collusion is the fact that most tracking happens without users’ knowledge or consent.

The screenshot below shows the number of websites Collusion found tracking me after I visited the top five most tracker-filled websites according to Privacy Score, namely The Drudge Report, El Paso Times, ReadWriteWeb, TwitPic and Merriam Webster. As a result of visiting just those five sites, according to Collusion, a total of 21 sites were made aware of my visit.

Collusion visualizes who's tracking your web browsing.

That sounds bad, and it is, but it may not even be the full picture. For comparison’s sake I loaded the same five sites and used the Do Not Track Plus add-on, which counted 47 sites with tracking bugs. Want another number? I repeated the test using the Ghostery add-on, which blocked 37 unique sites looking to track me. The variation in number of tracking elements detected is due to several factors, including what each system considers tracking. (Collusion for example, does not seem to count analytics or social buttons, while the others do.)

Even at the low end the numbers remain startling. Visiting five websites means somewhere between 21 and 47 other websites learn about your visit to those five.

If the extent of tracking bothers you there are some steps you can take to stop the tracking. The first would be to head to your browser preferences and turn off third-party cookies. Unfortunately, while that’s a step in the right direction (and you won’t lose any functionality the way you might with the rest of these solutions), some less scrupulous advertisers, including Google, have been caught circumventing this measure.

For a more complete solution you’ll need to use an add-on like Ghostery or Do Not Track Plus, both of which are available for most web browsers. The chief drawback to both of these solutions is that you may lose some functionality. To stick with the Facebook example used earlier, if Ghostery is blocking Facebook scripts then you won’t be able to use Like buttons. Fortunately both Ghostery and Do Not Track Plus allow you to customize which sites are blocked. I recommend blocking everything and then when you encounter something that isn’t working, click the Do Not Track Plus icon and edit the blocking options to allow, for example, Facebook so that Like buttons work (or Disqus so that comments work, etc.). That way you remain protected from the vast majority of invisible tracking, but can still enjoy the web services you choose to trust.

One final note about Webmonkey.com: There are 11 external scripts on this page. Four of them are for the social network buttons at the bottom of most posts. A fifth is for the Disqus comments system. There are also two analytics scripts, one from Google and one from Omniture. In addition to those seven functional scripts there are four ad network scripts from Brightcove, DoubleClick, Omniture and Lotame. (I can’t actually tell for sure what Lotame does, but it definitely collects data.) If you install the add-ons above Webmonkey will not be able to track you. If you don’t, it, like the rest of the web, will.

0
Your rating: None

theodp writes "The WSJ reports that a coalition of Internet giants including Google has agreed to support a do-not-track button to be embedded in most Web browsers — a move that the industry had been resisting for more than a year. The new do-not-track button isn't going to stop all Web tracking. The companies have agreed to stop using the data about people's Web browsing habits to customize ads, and have agreed not to use the data for employment, credit, health-care or insurance purposes. But the data can still be used for some purposes such as 'market research' and 'product development' and can still be obtained by law enforcement officers. Meanwhile, after Google got caught last week bypassing privacy settings on Safari, and was accused of also circumventing IE's P3P Privacy Protection feature, CBS MoneyWatch contacted Mozilla to see if it had noticed Google bypassing Firefox's privacy controls. After reports that Google ponied up close to a billion dollars to Mozilla to beat out a Microsoft bid, this seems to be one of those have-you-stopped-beating-your-wife type questions that has no good answer. Anyway, according to a statement attributed to Alex Fowler, global privacy and public policy lead for Mozilla: 'Our testing did not reveal any instances of Google bypassing user privacy settings.'"


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None