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William Shatner takes us into the Microworld for this 1980 promotional film from the AT&T Archives. Ah, the history of the future.

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After a string of strong supporting roles, Jude Law returns to the spotlight in Dom Hemingway. And what a noisy, colorful return it may be.

The gangster pic stars Law as a safecracker who’s just spent twelve years in prison for keeping his mouth shut. Once out, he reconnects with his old life by trying to collect his due from his boss (Demián Bichir) and make up with his estranged daughter (Emilia Clarke). Richard E. Grant plays Dom’s best friend, who’s along for the ride.

The first trailer has just hit, and you can check it out after the jump. Be warned that it’s NSFW, unless your own boss doesn’t mind seeing Law’s bare bottom on your computer screen.


[Digital Spy]

Law’s return to center stage comes not a moment too soon. He seems to be at the top of his form here, oozing charisma even as it becomes obvious that Dom is a terminal screw-up.

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Jonathan Glazer‘s heady sci-fi film Under the Skin finally hit festivals in the past month, and made quite an impression thanks to the fact that Scarlett Johansson plays an alien with a less than healthy interest in human men.

Some of the films unusual tone comes from the fact that Glazer shot on real streets without telling people they were being filmed; some of the men Johansson interacts with didn’t know they were in the movie until afterward. Maybe you got a sense of the film’s strange character in the first teaser that hit not long ago, but you can get a better look now.

Check out the full trailer below.

Expect to see Under the Skin in early 2014.

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CREEP echoes cover art

Dark Brooklyn-based duo CREEP release their debut album Echoes on November 12, ten tracks with with featured artists including Planningtorock and Romy Madley Croft – but they save their secret weapon for the after-dark finish. The seductive "Dim The Lights" enlists Sia, the powerful singer/songwriter who flies relatively under the radar despite her features with Guetta et al, and looms with nighttime longing. "Tectonic plates might shift/ I see it as a gift", Sia intones through swelling strings and thick bass. Here it's not a rumble made for a basement dancefloor, but between the sheets.

Pre-order Echoes here.

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Staff

Die Antwoord are back to once again cause a stir with their latest video, which accompanies the track "Cookie Thumper". Directed by frontman Ninja aka Waddy Jones, the video opens with a barefooted Yolandi dressed as a schoolgirl with a pink backpack, picking up weed from a gangster who has been let our of prison before inviting him back to ger orphanage. Once home, Yolandi smokes, dances around in a crocheted bikini, and urinates on the building's stairs. Check it out above.


www.dieantwoord.com

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Staff

British band Foals have collaborated with filmmaker Nabil once again (last time was for the track "Late Night") to produce the video for latest single "Bad Habit". Shot in Nabil's typically epic style, the visuals see lead singer Yannis Philippakis traipsing after a naked freckled girl in the desert. Prior to this, Nabil has worked with Kanye West, Frank Ocean, Nas, Bon Iver, The Black Eyed Peas, K'naan, Seal, and John Legend. Watch above!


www.nabil.com

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TIME Photo Department

Yolanda Cuomo is the curatorial voice behind some of the 20th century’s greatest photographic books. This year, alongside Melissa Harris, Cuomo is co-curating the LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, Va., June 13 – 15, 2013.

One word comes up again and again, like a shared mantra, when talking with Yolanda Cuomo, or when discussing Cuomo with people who know her: collaboration. Hardly surprising, perhaps, in light of the talent that, at one time or another, the 55-year-old art director and designer has worked with — including creative icons from Avedon and Sylvia Plachy to Twyla Tharp and Laurie Anderson. But one quickly gets the sense that, in Cuomo’s world, collaboration is not simply one way to approach a project; it’s the only way to approach a project.

As her longtime friend (“creative soulmate” might be a more apt description), Aperture Foundation editor-in-chief Melissa Harris, puts it: “Yolanda is simply one of the greatest people I know. She is so full of ideas, and our collaborations [on books, magazines, exhibitions] have been so fantastic because we always approach each project from an utterly fresh perspective. And we laugh,” she adds, making it clear that humor is an integral element of their long-time, enormously fruitful partnership. “We laugh a lot.”

The driving force behind the celebrated Yolanda Cuomo Studio, Yo (as all her friends and colleagues call her) has helped envision and produce some of the most striking and influential art and photography books of the past two decades, including Diane Arbus’ Revelations, Gilles Peress’ Farewell to Bosnia, Pre-Pop Warhol and scores of other titles.
(Incredibly, it was only within the last year, with New York at Night, that Cuomo got what she calls her “first spine.” She’d done 85 books through the years, she told LightBox, “but Norma Stevens and I published New York at Night in 2012 and, holy shit, there was my name on the spine!”).

A graduate of Cooper Union, Cuomo got her start in the publishing world as a junior designer at Condé Nast in the early 1980s. Under the mentorship of the legendary art director Marvin Israel, she not only was introduced to many of the people who would become part of her vast and cherished professional extended family — Plachy, Avedon, Peress, Nan Goldin and others — but also got her very first lessons, from a master, in the power of collaboration.

Yolanda Cuomo at her desk in her Chelsea studio, New York NY, February 4, 2012.

Pete Pin

Yolanda Cuomo at her desk in her new Chelsea studio in February.

“Marvin was so brilliant,” Cuomo says, “and one of the key things I learned from him — by his example, not by his making a big deal out of it — was that bringing other peoples’ voices and sensibilities to a project can make it so much stronger and more wonderful than if only one person holds sway over everything.”

The reason Cuomo got the job at Condé Nast in the first place, meanwhile, is emblematic of another type of creativity altogether.

“I lied,” she says, her mischievous laugh all these years later suggesting that she still can’t believe it herself. “When I was interviewed [for the Condé job] I told them that of course I knew how to do mechanicals. Then I went right out and immediately called a friend and was like, ‘What’s a mechanical?’”

Regardless of how she got her foot in the door, Cuomo learned the ins and outs of the art and publishing worlds from the very best. A quick study, she was eventually asked to oversee a new project by the Village Voice, and in 1985 Yolanda Cuomo was named art director of the Voice’s short-lived, tremendously creative fashion magazine, Vue. There, she and her small staff were afforded the sort of creative freedom that, for anyone working in magazines today, must seem something from another, near-mythical age.

Courtesy of the Village Voice/Yolanda Cuomo Design

Courtesy of the Village Voice/Yolanda Cuomo Design

Cover and spreads from the September 1986 issue of Vue. Photographs by Amy Arbus.

“It was total carte blanche,” Cuomo recalls. “We had to fill 32 pages that came out once a month. We sat in a room and just said to each other, ‘Okay, let’s call up people we love.’”

The names of those people they loved comprise something of a Who’s Who of talent of the era — each one of whom brought a unique sensibility to the pages of Vue. For one shoot, Sylvia Plachy photographed models posing in the trees of a New York cemetery. For another, Nan Goldin commissioned a pregnant bodybuilder friend to model lingerie in the East Village’s Russian baths. Phrases like “creative foment” seem to have been coined to describe exactly the sort of atmosphere that existed when Yolanda Cuomo was learning her chops.

The Voice shut down Vue after just a half-dozen issues, but its young staff, thrilled by what they’d accomplished together, was not ready to quit working as a team. With her assistant and two others, Cuomo found a small office space in Manhattan, and her design studio was born.

The studio’s first photo book was Unguided Tour, a collection of work by Sylvia Plachy.

“When we work together,” Plachy says of her collaborations with Cuomo, “we both have an intuitive sense about editing and designing. Yo is open to new things; she responds to things in the moment. She doesn’t force her point of view. Instead, it’s a free-flowing enjoyment of the evolution of the ideas, and moving toward something new and exciting.”

For Cuomo, inspiration can come from anywhere, from any time and from anyone. An old French book about the Eiffel Tower, for instance, discovered in a bookstore in Paris decades earlier, might influence the design of a photography book today. Closer to home, while making Paolo Pellegrin’s 2012 artist book — designed in a single, breakneck week — Cuomo found a visual muse in her assistant designer’s workspace.

“Bonnie [Briant] had a little color copy of a dog photo that she loved taped to her notebook on her desk, and I saw it and thought, ‘That is so beautiful.’”

A scan of the notebook — Scotch tape and scratches included — became the cover of the Pellegrin book. “That’s the way I like to work,” Cuomo says. “Spontaneously inventing.”

The fact that Cuomo has a full life outside of her work — a life that helps inform everything she does — speaks volumes about her ability to find balance in both the spontaneous and the thoroughly predictable. Living in Weehawken, New Jersey, Cuomo rides her bike every day from her home to the ferry, which she takes across the Hudson River to the West Side of Manhattan and her studio. At day’s end, she heads back across the river, to her “big old Victorian house,” her garden, her family — in other words, to a world that adds meaning and color to her vocation as an art director, designer and teacher.

In the end, that might be the greatest collaboration of them all: the way Yolanda Cuomo weaves family and work, leisure and labor, vision and vocation into a fully realized world of her own making.

Alissa Ambrose & Ben Cosgrove

See more of Cuomo’s work at Yolanda Cuomo Design.

Alissa Ambrose is a freelance writer and photo editor based in New York. Ben Cosgrove is the editor of LIFE.com.

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Skye Parrott

baby elephant ocean

On this slow, rainy Friday before the long weekend, the best we have to offer over here is some videos of animals and children. The first is a baby elephant swimming in the ocean for the first time. The second is a crippled lion and his friends, who are wiener dogs. The last one is  is a bossy little girl (not technically a wild animal but if you spend any time around kids, you’ll probably agree with me that it counts). Have a good long weekend and we’ll see you Tuesday.

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