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Following their animated and narrated visualization on political contributions over time, VisPolitics maps Boston political donations in MoneyBombs.

This video of the Boston metropolitan area reveals the geographic distribution of political donations made by individuals throughout 2012. We identify two types of temporal bursts of campaign contributions. We call both "moneybombs" because they reveal a temporal clustering. The first type occurs when many small donations are given on the same day to a candidate. We call this a grassroots moneyb omb. The second are bursts of extremely large donations, that take advantage of campaign finance laws and allow individuals to donate more than the traditional $5,000 limit. We call this the Joint Committee moneybomb.

Like in the first project, the narration provides a clear view of the data in front of you. There are also videos for just presidential donations and Republican and Democratic donations.

[Thanks, Mauro]

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It's a commonly held myth that to attain high rankings in your category on Google's Play Store (formerly Android Market) you need at least tens of thousands of dollars to have the slightest hope in hitting the top 10. For an indie developer self-publishing, it can seem a formidable challenge to reach those top spots. Let me assure you though -- it's possible to scale those charts without actually spending a penny on your first ...

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About

2/10 Would Not Bang is an image macro series in which photos of physically attractive women (and occasionally men) are scrutinized for minor or imagined flaws, prefaced by an ironically low rating on a scale of one to ten. The images are meant to parody hypocritical judgments made about women’s sex appeal on the Internet.

Origin

The rise in popularity of the phrase “would not bang” can be attributed to the advice animal series Butthurt Dweller, which represents Internet commenters who are smug and judgmental about the physical appearance of others. On August 4th, 2011, a Butthurt Dweller Quickmeme[14] image was submitted with the caption “‘That bitch got fat since high school, would not bang’ / 90 lbs overweight” (shown left). On September 15th, another Butthurt Dweller image with the caption “6/10 / Would Not Bang” (shown right) was submitted to the image macro site Meme Generator.[12]

On January 3rd, 2012, a thread titled “Would not bang” was submitted to 4chan’s[1] /b/ (random) board, which featured a photo of actress, model and WWE fighter Stacy Keibler.[2] The image was captioned in red text with criticisms of subtle details in the photo and the words “2/10 / Would Not Bang” in white. The thread received 545 replies prior to being archived, many of which included new versions of the meme.

Precursor: Sharp Knees

On June 23rd, 2004, a photo gallery of Playboy model Carla Harvey was submitted to the Internet humor site Fark[13], to which user studman69 replied:

“I definitely would NOT hit it. Just look at those sharp knees. She is way below my standard.”

The comment became an ironic catchphrase on the site and inspired photoshopped screenshots of the comment with images of unattractive men.

Spread

On January 3rd, 2012, a post titled “2/10 would not bang girls” was submitted to the /r/4chan[3] subreddit, which included images from the original 4chan thread posted earlier that same day. On January 4th, a compilation of “would not bang” examples was submitted to FunnyJunk.[5] On January 7th, Body Building[7] forum user KuRdiSh created a thread titled “2/10 WOULD NOT BANG (pic)”, featuring the original image of Stacy Keibler from 4chan. On January 24th, the Internet humor blog UpRoxx[8] published an article titled “Meme Watch: ‘2/10, Would Not Bang’ Is Here to Help Point Out The Flaws You Might Have Missed”, which applauded the meme for parodying Internet commenters’ hyper-criticism of beauty. The following day, Slacktory[9] writer Cole Stryker published an article titled “2/10 Would Not Bang: 4chan’s Funniest New Meme”, which included several examples of the series.

The meme has continued to spread on sites like FunnyJunk[16] and Tumblr[6] under the tag “#would not bang.” As of April 24th, 2012, a Facebook[15] page for “2/10 Would NOT BANG” has received 192 likes.

Notable Examples


Derivative: Would Bang

On January 23rd, a photo of Valve co-founder Gabe Newell featuring the caption “10/10, would bang” reached the front page of the /r/gaming[17] subreddit, accumulating over 800 up votes in less than 24 hours. Several other inverse editions of “would not bang” have since been created with unflattering photographs.

Derivative: Would Not X

On January 26th, The Huffington Post[10] published a post titled “2/10 Would Not Bang Meme: What Else Won’t People Do?”, which included variations of the series including “would not eat”, “would not save” and “would not date” derivatives.

  

Search Interest

Searches for “would not bang” were relatively low in volume until January of 2012, the same month the earliest “2/10, would not bang” derivatives appeared.

External References

[1] Chanarchive – Would not bang (nsfw)

[2] Wikipedia – Stacy Keibler

[3] Reddit – 2/10 WOULD NOT BANG – GIRLS

[4] imgur – 2/10 WOULD NOT BANG

[5] FunnyJunk – Would Not Bang

[6] Tumblr – #would not bang

[7] Body Building Forums – 2/10 WOULD NOT BANG

[8] UpRoxx – 2/10 would not bang Is Here To Help Point Out The Flaws You May Have Missed

[9] Slacktory – 2/10 Would Not Bang 4chans Funniest New Meme

[10] The Huffington Post – 2/10 Would Not Bang Meme What Else Won’t People Do?

[11] Wicked Fire – I review chicks 2/10 would not bang

[12] Meme Generator – 6/10

[13] Fark – Playboy hottie: Carla Harvey

[14] Quickmeme – That bitch got fat since high school

[15] Facebook – 2/10 Would NOT BANG

[16] FunnyJunk – would not bang

[17] Reddit – Would do, indeed

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First time accepted submitter jehan60188 writes with this excerpt from an article from Hack a Day: "The 28th Annual Chaos Communication Congress just wrapped things up on December 31st and they've already published recordings of all the talks at the event. These talks were live-streamed, but if you didn't find time in your schedule to see all that you wanted, you'll be happy to find your way to the YouTube collection of the event. The topics span a surprising range. We were surprised to see a panel discussion on depression and suicide among geeks ... which joins another panel called Queer Geeks, to address some social issues rather than just hardcore security tech. But there's plenty of that as well with topics on cryptography, security within web applications, and also a segment on electronic currencies like Bitcoins.'"

The CCC wiki has a list of mirrors with downloads in multiple formats (including WebM).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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In June, the UN Human Rights Council declared there should be no discrimination or violence against people based on their sexual orientation. The controversial resolution marked the first time that the Council recognized equal rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. In the same month, New York became the most populous U.S. state to allow gay marriage, in a high-profile victory for gay rights activists. This series of images tracks the status of LGBT rights in 42 nations based on data from the International lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex association.

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Some new photos up on Time Magazine's Lightbox


A wider edit up on my site


Also, another project that I just finished scanning should be done sometime soon..a month or so.

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Tenderoni - Kele

I’m so fucking excited for Coachella.

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About

60’s Spider-Man refers to image macros from stills taken from an old Spider-Man cartoon series, which is infamous due to it’s poor quality animation, writing, and voice acting. The overlaid text typically represents Spider-Man’s absurd internal monologue relating to what action can be seen in the image.

Origin

The images were taken from the Spider-Man animated television series that ran from September 9, 1967 to June 14, 1970. It was jointly produced in Canada (for voice talent) and the United States (for animation) and was the first animated adaptation of the Spider-Man comic book series, created by writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko.

The meme on originated on the internet around 2009 after users of /co/ would stream episodes of the show and invite others anon’s to come and watch. The show itself was very low budget. This can be noted by the over-use of stock animation, such as images of Spider-Man swinging across skylines and the focuses on his face. The fact that the show was low budget contributed to the poor animation. Being a poorly animated show, there were tons of funny, awkward, over dramatic and odd poses Spider Man and other characters would strike into at random times during the show. This amused the majority of viewers would in return would post these images on the board after an episode ended, some what like a recap of the funny parts. As time went on and these images were saved and circulated, highly exploitable and funny to look at it wasn’t long until they gained captions and started being used reaction images.

Spread

60’s Spider-Man has seen growing popularity on blog sites such as Tumblr[1][2] since the beginning of April 2011. However, evidence of the meme on the blog site has been noted as early as November of 2010. The earliest evidence of 60’s Spider-Man on Tumblr came from a blog called “Wallopin Websnappers”[3]. The person behind the blog collected over 700 screenshots from the 1967 show and posted a good amount of them individually without captions.

4chan Thread

4chan archive has a /co/ thread from July 19, 2009 titled “Spider-man on his day off”[4] with 153 posts featuring images of Spider-Man with humorous titles that are very similar to the overlaid text found in the image macros.

Notable Examples

Search

Search traffic for “spiderman meme” has seen a significant increase since January, 2011 that may correlate with the resurgence of popularity with the 60’s Spider-Man image macros.

External References

[1] Tumblr – Spiderman Spiderman

[2] Tumblr – Fuck Yeah Spidermemes

[3] Tumblr – Wallopin Websnappers

[4] 4chan archive

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About

You, sir, are and idiot is a catchphrase and a corrupted variant of the phrase “You, sir, are an idiot,” originally uttered by Krusty the Klown in an episode of The Simpsons. The quote was subsequently popularized on 4chan, with the conjunction “and” replacing the indefinite article “an” for an additional layer of irony. The phrase now implies “I believe that I know more than you, despite my own ineptitude.”

Origin

“You, sir, are an idiot” was first said by Krusty the Klown in episode 9 of Season 15 of The Simpsons, entitled “The Last Temptation of the Krust.” It originally aired February 22nd, 1998.

‘You sir’ is a common prefix that can be added to the beginning of a declarative statement. It is often used to add emphasis to an opinion or to imply a tone of respect. By all implications of the phrase, one is ironically saying “I respectfully disrespect you.”

Use

The phrase appeared on Urban Dictionary in September 2008. Its usage can be seen in the following samples from 4chanarchive (WARNING: 18+, NSFW):

Derivatives

Googling the phrase yields approximately 25,000+ results. Many of those hits are people using the phrase on message boards to call other posters out (like on this GameSpot thread in 2008) or to troll (as seen in this Adult Swim thread in 2010. It has also been used in comments, as seen on Failblog in 2008, to criticize other users.

However, since the derivatives lack much in terms of original content or recontextualization, it is more of a forced catchphrase meme.

Google Insights

Significant search trends for both variations of the phrase began showing up in August and September of 2008. It is not entirely clear what would cause the phrase to regain popularity 10 years after debuting in popular culture.

The phrase peaked again in September and December of 2009, although there is no clear explanation as to why.

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