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Marc Andreessen has been going crazy on Twitter lately after a long time away.

His latest outburst is a humorous take on people's reaction to Silicon Valley since 1993.

Andreessen, for those that don't know, is a board member at Facebook, HP, eBay, and a lot of other places. He's co-founder of venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. He also created the Netscape browser, which helped kickstart the dot com boom.

He's wildly optimistic about technology. And he's making fun of everyone that is a worrywort or skeptic with these tweets.

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andreessen

Marc Andreessen was on Charlie Rose this week, and he dropped this super smart nugget on the tech industry:

The core idea we have, the core theory we have, is that the fundamental output of a technology company is innovation and that's very different than a lot of businesses, right? The fundamental output of a car company is cars. Or the fundamental output of a bank is loans. The fundamental output of a tech company is innovation, so, the value of what you've actually built so far, and are shipping today is a small percentage of the value of what you're going to ship in the future if you're good at innovation. So the challenge tech companies have is they can never rest on their laurels with today's product, they always have to be thinking in terms of the next five years of what comes next and if they're good at running internally and are indeed a machine that produces innovation, they tend to do quite well over time. It's when things go wrong internally and they stop innovating, which happens alot, that the wheels at some point tend to come off.

This quote is great insight to the difference between Silicon Valley and the rest of the world.

The reason Instagram was worth $1 billion without any revenue is because people in the Valley look at the company and think, "the value of what it's going to ship in the future is huge." People outside the Valley see a money-losing photo app and think it's worthless.

As for the other part, it helps to explain why companies like AOL, Yahoo, and Microsoft have gone sideways for years now.

It also explains why Google is working on glasses and self-driving cars. It's trying to produce the next generation of innovation. It might make its money from search, but as Andreessen points out, it's really in the business of innovation.

Watch the full interview >

Disclosure: Marc Andreessen is an investor in Business Insider.

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Collusion for Chrome

Disconnect, the team behind privacy extensions like Facebook, Twitter, and Google Disconnect, has traditionally focused on stopping sites from sending your data back to social networks and other collection entities. These sites, however, aren't the only ones getting information from your browsing, and a new Disconnect tool, "Collusion for Chrome," will chart a map of where exactly your clicks are going.

That name ought to sound familiar — it's the same as an experimental Firefox extension that Mozilla created several weeks ago. On Firefox, Collusion opens a new, almost blank tab. As you browse, the tab adds a circle for each site, then sniffs out where that data is going. Within a few clicks, you're likely to have a tangled web linked...

Continue reading…

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Standards-based open Web technologies are increasingly capable of delivering interactive multimedia experiences; the kind that used to only be available through plugins or native applications. This trend is creating new opportunities for gaming on the Web.

New standards are making it possible for Web applications to implement 3D graphics, handle input from gamepad peripherals, capture and process audio and video in real-time, display graphical elements in a fullscreen window, and use threading for parallelization. Support for mobile gaming has also gotten a boost from features like device orientation APIs and improved support for handling touchscreen interaction.

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Firefox 6 is now available. This update to the popular open source web browser comes just eight weeks after Firefox 5 was unveiled. The quick turnaround time and increasing version numbers are part of Mozilla’s new rapid release cycle.

You can grab the latest version of Firefox from the Mozilla downloads site or head to the About Firefox menu and apply the update.

Firefox 6 doesn’t bring any huge changes to the table, despite what the version number bump might imply (and in fact Mozilla is planning to hide the version number so future releases will just be "Firefox"), but it is up to 20 percent faster than Firefox 5.

The most noticeable change to the look of Firefox 6 is the move to a Chrome-style URL bar where the domain name is now darker than the rest of the URL. Firefox 6 doesn’t dispense with the HTTP prefix the way Chrome does, but Firefox 7, which will soon move from the Aurora to the Beta channel, will hide the http:// portion of the URL.

Firefox 6 does include some nice new tools for web developers. Scratchpad is a new JavaScript editor that’s well worth checking out, and the Web Console panel has also been improved.

For a complete list of everything that’s new in Firefox 6, check out the extensive release notes.

See Also:

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Whether it’s browser improvements, new web standards or just design trends, we spend a fair amount of time talking about the future of the web here at Webmonkey.

Sometimes though it’s good to take a step back and remember that no one knows what the future of the web will really look like. In fact most predictions turn out to be utterly wrong.

In that spirit, here’s a 1995 piece from MTV on this crazy thing called the Internet.

What makes this bit of time capsule trivia worth more than a cheap laugh is a) the hacking, privacy, and freedom of speech issues raised are still far from settled even today and b) the amazing thing about the web isn’t how much it’s changed, but how much it remains basically the same.

Okay. Back to work.

[via the Awl]

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