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Lemeowski writes "Game studios go to great lengths to protect their IP. But board game designer Daniel Solis doesn't subscribe to that philosophy. He has spent the past ten years blogging his game design process, posting all of his concepts and prototypes on his blog. Daniel shares four things he's learned after designing games in public, saying paranoia about your ideas being stolen "is just an excuse not to do the work." His article provides a solid gut check for game designers and other creatives who may let pride give them weird expectations."

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This is a guest post written by Claude Johnson, a Lead Site Reliability Engineer at salesforce.com.

The following is an architectural overview of salesforce.com’s core platform and applications. Other systems such as Heroku's Dyno architecture or the subsystems of other products such as work.com and do.com are specifically not covered by this material, although database.com is. The idea is to share with the technology community some insight about how salesforce.com does what it does. Any mistakes or omissions are mine.

This is by no means comprehensive but if there is interest, the author would be happy to tackle other areas of how salesforce.com works. Salesforce.com is interested in being more open with the technology communities that we have not previously interacted with. Here’s to the start of “Opening the Kimono” about how we work.

Since 1999, salesforce.com has been singularly focused on building technologies for business that are delivered over the Internet, displacing traditional enterprise software. Our customers pay via monthly subscription to access our services anywhere, anytime through a web browser. We hope this exploration of the core salesforce.com architecture will be the first of many contributions to the community.

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Original author: 
Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange

This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites.

abel is in the early stages of developing a closed-source financial app within a niche market. He is hiring his first employees, and he wants to take steps to ensure these new hires don't steal the code and run away. "I foresee disabling USB drives and DVD writers on my development machines," he writes. But will that be enough? Maybe a better question is: will that be too much?

See the original question here.

Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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<< Previous | Next >>Oracle-Racing-AC72-capsize-05

The Oracle Team USA flipped its AC72 racer on San Francisco Bay, then worked into the wee hours Wednesday hauling the wreckage back to shore. Photo: Guilain Grenier/America's Cup

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Oracle boss Larry Ellison wanted to make the America’s Cup as exciting as Nascar. He’s succeeded.

His team, the defending champs at Oracle Team USA, capsized one of its wickedly fast AC72 catamarans in San Francisco Bay on Tuesday during the team’s eighth day on the water, then scrambled to keep it from drifting out to sea.

“We’ve been pushing the boat all the time and every day we go out we’re pushing it more and more,” team tactician Tom Slingsby told reporters. “We found our limit.”

More on America’s Cup

Video: The World’s Best Sailors Tame The World’s Meanest Boats

America’s Cup Brings Big Beautiful Cats to the Bay

Inside Larry Ellison’s Insane Plan to Make America’s Cup a TV Spectacle

America’s Cup Racers Push Sailboats to the Limit

No kidding.

These boats are fast and mean, designed to be the most demanding sailboats on the water with the most skilled crews on the planet. They don’t use sails, but wings. They’re made largely of carbon fiber, and they’re huge: 72 feet long, with a beam of 46 feet and a mast 131 feet, 7 inches tall. They can hit 30 knots, and it takes 11 people to sail them.

According to the Cup folks, conditions were “fresh,” with 25-knot winds and one of the strongest ebb currents of the year. As the team turned downwind away from San Francisco, the bow dove, the stern rose and the boat pitch-poled.

In other words, it flipped.

“When the nose went down, the wing hit and a few guys went in the water,”  Slingsby said in a statement. “We were unsure if the wing would snap, so we all climbed off the boat.”

The boat slammed into the water on its side, destroying the carbon fiber wing sail and scattering very, very expensive bits of carbon fiber over the bay. No one was injured, but the current pulled the boat through the Golden Gate and out to sea even as the team, joined by a crew dispatched from shore, tried to rein in the wreckage.

“It was amazing — we watched it tip right over, and it looked like the top of the wing came right off,” one witness told the San Francisco Chronicle. “Then the big ebb tide just took it right out under the bridge, and it was obvious there was nothing they could do.”

The team managed to return the boat, or what’s left of it, to shore Wednesday morning. The wing was destroyed and the boat, which costs $8-10 million, needs extensive repairs. The rules allow each team to build two AC72 boats; this was the first of the two launched by Oracle. The second hits the water early next year.

“There’s no question this is a setback. This will be a big test for our team,” said skipper Jimmy Spithill. “But I’ve seen these guys in a similar situation in the past campaign before we won the America’s Cup. A strong team will bounce back from it.”

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Eric Jonas

A couple of MIT PhDs have created an amazing new kind of database called Veritable.

Prior Knowledge, a startup, launched Veritable on Tuesday at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference, and while it only made it to the finals at the show, it was the real winner for us.

Veritable doesn't just store information and spit it back out at you. It uses complicated math to predict things based on the data.

"We're aware of a company called Oracle," CEO Eric Jonas said. "But their products only tell us what you already know."

A key feature of Veritable is that it doesn't require special knowledge to use, as some new database alternatives do. It is geared toward the millions of programmers, business analysts, and other users who use SQL, a specialized programming language used to tap into databases.

To give some perspective on that, Jonas said he looked up Yahoo on LinkedIn and found there were 2,500 employees at that company who know SQL. (Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer was on stage as a judge.)

Veritable wouldn't replace existing databases from Oracle and the like. Rather, it would run alongside them, much as data-warehouse software does, and generate insights.

Companies could use Veritable to discover hidden relationships in data they already have. For instance, it can sift through a medical database to predict a public-health threat. Dating sites could predict the perfect love match.

Prior Knowledge, which launched in January, last month raised $1.4 million in seed money from Peter Thiel's Founders Fund.

Please follow SAI: Enterprise on Twitter and Facebook.

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Android Java

Over a week after it began deliberations, the jury has returned a verdict in the patent infringement case between Oracle and Google, finding that the search giant did not infringe upon Oracle's patents with Android. In play were infringement counts on eight different claims across two separate patents: RE38,104 and 6,061,520. Given the decision, there will be no need for a damages phase in connection with the patent claims, and with the recent agreement by Google and Oracle to postpone any damages hearings related to copyright infringement, the jury has now been dismissed from the proceedings altogether. Judge William Alsup thanked the jurors for their hard work before they left the courtroom, noting that "this is the longest trial,...

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Oracle has declined to patch a critical vulnerability in its flagship database product, leaving customers vulnerable to attacks that siphon confidential information from corporate servers and execute malware on backend systems, a security researcher said.

Virtually all versions of the Oracle Database Server released in the past 13 years contain a bug that allows hackers to perform man-in-the-middle attacks that monitor all data passing between the server and end users who are connected to it. That's what Joxean Koret, a security researcher based in Spain, told Ars. The "Oracle TNS Poison" vulnerability, as he has dubbed it, resides in the Transparent Network Substrate Listener, which routes connections between clients and the database server. Koret said Oracle learned of the bug in 2008 and indicated in a recent e-mail that it had no plans to fix current supported versions of the enterprise product because of concerns it could cause "regressions" in the code base.

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Phillip Burton Federal Building and US Courthouse

The copyright phase of the Oracle vs. Google infringement trial has been winding on for two weeks, but we moved one step closer to resolution today with the attorneys for both sides presenting their closing arguments. Oracle attorney Michael Jacobs made his client's case, referring to the trial as being "mostly about Google's excuses." As evidence of Google's wrongdoing, Jacobs pointed to email exchanges that have surfaced throughout the trial, in which the likes of Eric Schmidt, Andy Rubin, and Tim Lindholm discuss how Google needed to acquire a license from Sun for the use of Java in Android.

Stating that the 37 APIs in question were the "crown jewels" of Java — ones which Google had used to ensure quick developer uptake for Android...

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