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When choosing your outsource partner keep in mind all costs, not just their day rate. Every hour you spend reviewing, communicating, and revising work has a dollar value. When added up, a low day rate can have very high costs.

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snydeq writes "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister discusses the use of quizzes and brain-teasers in evaluating potential software development hires, a practice that seems to be on the rise. 'The company best known for this is Google. Past applicants tell tales of a head-spinning battery of coding problems, riddles, and brain teasers, many of which seem only tangential to the task of software development. Other large companies have similar practices — Facebook and Microsoft being two examples,' McAllister writes. 'You'll need to assess an applicant's skill in one way or another, but it's also possible to take the whole interview-testing concept too far. Here are a few thoughts to keep in mind when crafting your test questions, to avoid slamming the door on candidates unnecessarily.'"

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As Asia's largest games and digital expo, last month's ChinaJoy event boasted over 150 exhibitors from fifteen countries, pulling in a trade crowd of over 10,000 visitors. At the annual event GamesIndustry.biz met with Zhihai Han, secretary general of ChinaJoy and deputy secretary general of General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP), the Chinese government agency responsible for regulating the games industry in China, and Haoxia Ming, managing director of Shanghai Multimedia Industry Association (SMIA), China's largest games industry association to discuss another successful year, the regional industry as a whole, future trends in China and why it's long since shrugged off the perception that it's just a place for the West to send its outsourcing.


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If you work in any kind of service industry you’ve undoubtedly come across the Request For Proposal, or “RFP.” The RFP process has become a standard by which organizations solicit competitive bids. It attempts to level the playing field and minimize bias by holding everyone to the same requirements—no special treatment, no rule bending. In return, the organization issuing the RFP is able to select a vendor by comparing apples to apples. Alas, in practice, RFPs are the least creative way to hire creative people. The rigidity of the process, and the lack of meaningful dialogue makes this little more than a game of roulette. How can we successfully navigate the heartburn-inducing RFP process? And what can we as an industry do to turn RFPs into the exception rather than the default means of hiring an agency?

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