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timothy

cylonlover writes "A team of scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore has developed a new image sensor from graphene that promises to improve the quality of images captured in low light conditions. In tests, it has proved to be 1,000 times more sensitive to light than existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) or charge-coupled device (CCD) camera sensors in addition to operating at much lower voltages, consequently using 10 times less energy."

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Original author: 
Carl Franzen

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In a boost to future secret agents and a blow to their would-be eavesdroppers, German researchers report sending the first successful quantum communications from a moving source — an airplane traveling 180 miles-per-hour — to a stationary receiver on the ground. The study was first performed in 2012 but the results were just made public over the weekend in the journal Nature Photonics.

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MrSeb writes "Electrical engineers and material scientists at MIT have created a fiber-borne laser that could be woven to form a flexible display that could project different 3D images in any number of directions, to any number of viewers. MIT's fiber is similar to standard telecoms fiber, but it has a tiny droplet of fluid embedded in the core. When laser light hits the fluid, it scatters, effectively creating a 360-degree laser beam. The core is then surrounded by layers of liquid crystal, which can be controlled like 'pixels,' allowing the laser light to escape from specific points anywhere along the length of the fiber. This means that you could have a display that shows one picture on the 'front' and another on the 'back' — or different, glasses-free 3D images for everyone sitting in front and behind. In the short term, the laser fiber is more likely to have a significant application in photodynamic therapy, an area of medicine where drugs are activated using light. Photodynamic therapy is one of the only ways to treat cancer in a relatively non-invasive and non-toxic manner. MIT's laser could be threaded into almost any part of the body, where the ability to produce pixels of laser light at any point along its length would make it a highly accurate device."


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In 1905, Albert Einstein showed that the photoelectric effect—the ability of metals to produce an electric current when exposed to light—could be explained if light is quantum, traveling in discrete bundles of energy. His model, the photon theory, won him the Nobel Prize in 1921, but it left us with an enigma: why does the classical model of electric fields yield correct experimental results for some systems, but fail so dramatically for the photoelectric effect? In other words, at what point does the quantum world begin and the classical world end?

By directing very intense light to a nanoscale needle-like tip, G. Herink, D. R. Solli, M. Gulde, and C. Ropers have bridged the gap between the quantum and classical views of the photoelectric effect. The sheer number of photons hitting the needle dwarf the number of electrons involved, which ensures that individual photon interactions do not dominate. Instead, they created a quasi-classical system in which the bulk electric field of all the photons influences individual electrons. This result shows why the classical and quantum views are correct in certain regimes, and hints at an entirely new way to manipulate electrons in nanoscale materials.

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First time accepted submitter probain writes "MIT has made a camera that can take trillion frames per second! With this high speed capability, they can actually see the movement of photons of light across a scene or object. This is just mind-boggling." ExtremeTech has a nice video of the system, too. What would you like to see slowed down to such a degree?

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