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The Shor algorithm works perfectly (gives you a useful value of k) more than 40% of the time.  That may not sound great.  But if it doesn’t work the first time, why not try it a few thousand more times?  On a quantum computer, this algorithm is effectively instantaneous.

I left a couple of details out of the math here because, frankly, this post is a little over the top.  If you read all the way to here, buy yourself a drink and take a nap.  However, if you’re interested in exactly why you need N>M2, how execute the quantum Fourier transform, and why the algorithm works better than 40% of the time, then there are some rough notes in this pdf: Shor.

A commenter pointed out that the equations in this post may not be showing up for everyone.  In partial remedy, here’s a pdf of the above post: quantum_RSA_Shor.

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TEDxHull - Dr. Tom Whyntie - How Do You Kill A Theory?

When should science give up on its ideas? To what extent does scientific progress rely on belief? Based on the searches for dark matter at the Large Hadron Collider, Tom explains how he still hasn't found what he's looking for. www.TEDxHull.com
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Neil Leifer’s 1965 photograph of Muhammad Ali hovering over a knocked-out Sonny Liston may be the most famous sports shot of all time, but you will not find it at “The Sports Show,” a photography and new-media exhibit at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Nor will you find a single picture of the most famous athlete of the past 15 years, Tiger Woods, or of the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team celebrating its miracle win, or of American soccer player Brandi Chastain ripping off her shirt after clinching the 1999 World Cup. Can you really mount a worthwhile retrospective of sports photography without these iconic athletes and moments? Turns out you can. In fact, “The Sports Show” (on view through May 13) is better off for it.

When I checked out the exhibit on opening day, I expected a greatest-hits compendium of sports images. But curator David Little took a more surprising approach, choosing photographs that offer more social commentary than celebration. For example, the circa-1899 portrait of female high school students playing basketball in dresses sends the message that women, too, could participate in emerging sports. (The picture was taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston, whom LIFE magazine once called “the closest thing to an official court photographer the United States has ever had.”) More than a century later, that message continues to resonate: Title IX has delivered athletic opportunities to millions of girls, but female athletes still fight for the same opportunities and recognition that boys get.

The exhibit casts a skeptical eye on the emotional energy we expend on sports. In 1970 photographer Tod Papageorge toured the country capturing fans at big events like the Iron Bowl (the Alabama-vs.-Auburn college-football rivalry) and opening day at Yankee Stadium. Some people in the crowd are goofing off, but many others appear pensive. The photographs invite the viewer to wonder what the spectators are thinking and feeling. Is their favorite team losing? Or are real-life stresses still on their minds? Papageorge bitingly called this project—a portion of which is on display in Minneapolis—American Sports, 1970, or How We Spent the War in Vietnam.

Read More: “Big Shots: The impact of sports on society, seen through the camera’s eye.”

The Sports Show is on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts now through May 13.

MORE: Check out TIME.com’s new sports blog: Keeping Score.

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Long Beach, California—TED convened in Long Beach this morning, and in the beginning, there was science. Dubbed The Observatory, Session 1 was about how we look at our world and choose to engage it.

"Gazing out at the stars is the best way I know to evoke wonder," Chris Anderson, TED’s curator, opined. But just what are we looking at?

Brian Greene told the audience at TED that the wonder we see is not only mysterious, but a limited-run engagement. Greene is a theoretical physicist who has been engaging the public through books, PBS specials, and by organizing the World Science Festival. Here, Greene was in cosmologist mode, talking about how the Universe is going to change in ways that will fundamentally alter how it can be observed.

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NIPS 2011 Big Learning - Algorithms, Systems, & Tools Workshop: A Common GPU...

Big Learning Workshop: Algorithms, Systems, and Tools for Learning at Scale at NIPS 2011 Invited Talk: A Common GPU n-Dimensional Array for Python and C by Arnaud Bergeron Abstract: Currently there are multiple incompatible array/matrix/n-dimensional base object implementations for GPUs. This hinders the sharing of GPU code and causes duplicate development work.This paper proposes and presents a first version of a common GPU n-dimensional array(tensor) named GpuNdArray~\citep{GpuNdArray} that works with both CUDA and OpenCL.It will be usable from python, C and possibly other languages.
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