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Midnight City, Majesco's indie publishing arm, is bringing racer Krautscape and brawler Double Dragon: Neon to Steam as well as Slender: The Arrival to consoles, the company announced today.

Krautscape and Double Dragon: Neon will be available for Windows PC while Slender: The Arrival will be published for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 through the Xbox Games Store and PlayStation Network. All three titles will cost $9.99 each and are slated to launch in the first quarter of this year.

Mario von Rickenbach's Krautscape is racing title in which players drive along tracks to collect points and take to the air to avoid obstacles. Each track is generated by the vehicle in the first place, building itself out as players drive so no two tracks are alike. The game also features a number of different modes, including a speed challenge mode.

Double Dragon: Neon is a reboot of the original 1987 classic side-scrolling beat em up. For the Windows PC version of the title, developer Abstraction has added a new online co-op mode that allows players to share health and power as well as revive each other.

The console versions of Slender: The Arrival will also include new content. Blue Isle Studios created two new levels that will "delve deeper into the lives of those Slender Man has touched." These new levels will tell the story of Slender Man's victims through flashbacks, putting players in their terrified shoes. Blue Isle also plans to release these two new levels as a free update for the PC version after their console launch.

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Original author: 
Sam Byford

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When Sony unveiled the PlayStation 4 two months ago, many were impressed to see Mark Cerny fronting the presentation as lead system architect; the industry veteran first made his name by designing the classic Marble Madness at the age of 18, and has since been described as "the closest we have come to a modern-day da Vinci." Cerny hasn't spoken much about the PS4 since, but now a lengthy, in-depth interview with Gamasutra does a lot to explain the thinking behind the system's design.

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In Hackers, the 1995 cult teen cyber thriller, a young Angelina Jolie and an American-accented Jonny Lee Miller play WipEout in a club. Established hacker Angelina is pretty good at the game, and has the top score. But then upstart hacker genius Jonny smashes it to bits. They hate each other. They love each other.

At the end of the movie Angelina and Jonny fall into a swimming pool and, finally, kiss, as Squeeze's little-known love song Heaven Knows lifts the camera up into the air. A year later, in 1996, the pair married. By then, WipEout, the racer that evolved from that pre-rendered demo Angelina and Jonny pretended to play on the big screen, was the most exciting video game in the world.

Improbably, a dozen or so people from a north west England developer called Psygnosis had conspired to stomp on Mario's head and speed past silly Sonic onto the cover of style magazines. WipEout steered into the slipstream of a dance music-fuelled drug culture, leaving its racer rivals in its wake. Forget beeps and boops - WipEout on PlayStation had heavy beats. WipEout was for grown ups. WipEout was cool.

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24 Caret Games' reverse rhythm-shooter Retro/Grade is coming to Steam on March 20th, offering up exclusive support for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Wii guitar controllers.

The port otherwise boasts all of the features that made the original PS3 release such a standout, including a broad selection of challenge levels and difficulty settings that range from "doable" to "ridiculously challenging." Seriously, don't underestimate the hardest difficulty setting. It will humble you.

It's worth noting that the PS3 version of Retro/Grade is currently on sale for $3.49, or $2.44 if you're a PlayStation Plus member. It's definitely worth the cash -- I really enjoyed the time I spent with the game, and it easily ranked among my favorite PlayStation Network releases of last year.

[via Joystiq]

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Click here to read Why So Many Games These Days Are “Japan-Only”

Tales of Xillia is a great game—perhaps the best JRPG on the PlayStation 3. It was the second best-selling PS3 game in Japan last year (ninth best-selling in Japan overall), with 660,000 copies sold. And in a country where anything over 100,000 copies sold is considered a financial success, Tales of Xillia was a run-away hit. It was so popular that it is getting a numbered sequel coming out next week. Yet, despite its incredible level of popularity in Japan, it still hasn't come west. More »

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Just another day in the pixel mines.

Queasy Games

Music games can generally be divided into two broad categories: games that ask you to take part in making the music, and games where the music drives the gameplay. Sound Shapes straddles the line between those two types of games while layering an incredibly satisfying, abstract take on 2D platform games on top as well.

As you know if you've read our previous coverage, Sound Shapes turns you into nothing more than a small, sticky circle, caught in a world full of simple, abstract shapes rendered primarily in stark, solid colors. The goal is to roll and hop around to collect floating coins dotted around the game's rooms while avoiding enemies and their attacks, which are helpfully highlighted in a deadly red.

It sounds simple, and it is, as far as the gameplay is concerned (though the designers do a good job of stretching the simple concept as far as it can go, with levels that force you to make smart use of the jumping and sticking mechanics). But what makes the game really stand out is the way that each coin you collect activates a note that gets layered into a constantly evolving, mesmerizing backbeat that follows you from room to room.

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New submitter Serapth writes "Sony recently released the PlayStation Suite SDK to open beta. Using PSS, people are able to write games for various PlayStation certified devices in a C#/Mono based environment. This post takes a look at what's included in the SDK, which, surprisingly, is quite a bit."


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PlayStation Vita delivers what many thought impossible: a current-generation HD console experience in the palm of your hand. It's an exciting achievement, made possible by the most advanced gaming architecture of any mobile device on the market today combined with what many believe to be the most varied, high-quality launch line-up we've seen for any console launch.

While Uncharted: Golden Abyss has gone on to achieve considerable critical and sales success, many believe that the true star of Vita's launch line-up is Studio Liverpool's WipEout 2048 - a title that delivers a full-fat console experience and even improves upon WipEout HD in terms of game design and raw playability.

In this special Digital Foundry tech interview, we talk with Studio Liverpool's technical director Stuart Lovegrove and technical director of graphics tools and technologies Chris Roberts. We wanted to know just how closely Vita development mirrors that of PlayStation 3, what assets and coding techniques can be shared across the two platforms, and how closely involved the team was in the development of the platform.

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OnLive doesn't do enough to convince us that cloud gaming is ready to be the next big thing, but the fact that it works as well as it does is undoubtedly a major technological achievement. The company has set the standard for "first gen" performance in this field, and it's now down to others to enter the market and compete. And that's exactly what upstart rival Gaikai has done - with intriguing results.

Although based on similar principles, the implementation is very different. OnLive launched with a full games service, while Gaikai specialises in offering playable demos with plans to expand beyond that when the time is right. OnLive uses widely spaced datacentres to address a large area, whereas Gaikai offers more servers closer to players. The technology behind the video compression is also very different, with OnLive using hardware encoders while Gaikai uses the x264 software running on powerful Intel CPUs.

Gaikai reckons its approach results in more responsive gameplay, better base visuals and superior video compression. So how can this be tested?

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