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Click here to read Why So Many Games These Days Are “Japan-Only”

Tales of Xillia is a great game—perhaps the best JRPG on the PlayStation 3. It was the second best-selling PS3 game in Japan last year (ninth best-selling in Japan overall), with 660,000 copies sold. And in a country where anything over 100,000 copies sold is considered a financial success, Tales of Xillia was a run-away hit. It was so popular that it is getting a numbered sequel coming out next week. Yet, despite its incredible level of popularity in Japan, it still hasn't come west. More »

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Tommo Inc.

When Tommo Inc. first announced a new portable version of the classic Neo Geo hardware last month, we balked a bit at the $200 asking price for what is a more than two-decades-old system. Now, the company has announced a bare-bones version of the portable for the somewhat more reasonable price of $130 when it is released December 6.

The cheaper edition of the system, as described on the official website, doesn't include the cool docking station and replica arcade-style joystick of the $200 bundle (now being called the "Neo Geo X Gold"), but does come loaded with the same 20 classic Neo Geo games that were previously announced. It appears that the docking station will be necessary to play games on your TV through an HDMI output, though. It will also be required to play two-player games using a joystick that can be purchased separately (Tommo has yet to announce a price for additional joysticks).

We also have some more details on the upcoming portable's hardware specs, thanks to a report from Japanese site Inside Games. The report suggests the system is running a Linux OS and sports a 3.7V/2200mAh battery that is capable of playing games for about six hours after charging for three hours. The system's 4.3", 16:9 display runs at 480x272 resolution, the same size and resolution as the original Playstation Portable.

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Star Soldier

Title : Star Soldier
Publisher : Hudson
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PSP

Price : £19.99

First shoot 'em up release on the system and what a way to start the party with this update of the timeless PC Engine series that actually has more in common with the GameCube and PS2 cracker. Still the timed high score challenge is kept in there with its roots in the PC Engine Caravan contest. Speed of hand eye co-ordination is the key to clocking up a big score as bonuses are awarded for rapid destruction of incoming waves of enemy ships. The code has been optimized to fit the PSP's dimensions with the console being held vertically suiting the genre perfectly. And ergonomically it works like a dream too. Additional ships have been constructed and its now autofire so you don't have to worry about being able to see whilst frantically hammering the fire button. A very nice shooter, another medal to the Hudson lapel.

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Click here to read This PSP Beat 'Em Up Will Kick You in the Face

In Japan, where the PSP isn't dead, the latest Kenka Bancho will be out this summer. Check out the game's trailer. Warning annoying guitar music. More »

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 A Hacker Speaks

Among hackers and modders, Sony's PSP is a favorite for its hack-ability. Depending on one's knowledge, the portable console can be altered to play custom games and programs (homebrews) as well as pirated games. Taking all it's learned from the weaknesses of the PSP, Sony developed the PS Vita with safeguards against such hacks and mods. But recently, a hacker in Japan has utilized a security hole to hack into the Vita and successfully run his own custom program, much to Sony's chagrin. The hacker known as "Wololo" recently talked with Kotaku about the Vita's security. More »

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Sony's track record for supporting indie development is mixed, boasting some notable successes on the PlayStation Network Store, and some that stumbled from the start, like the downloadable Minis for PSP and PlayStation 3. Which approach will it take with the new PlayStation Vita, a machine that some would argue already faces a battle for survival in an iOS dominated market?

The answer will be found amongst the booming independent development scene, which has snaked its way into every viable platform on the market looking for outlets that will accept a new breed of experimental, left-field, single-minded and funky game play.

Ricky Haggett and Dick Hogg from Honeyslug admit to being "bewildered" by the machine at first, even after they were specifically approached by their account manager at Sony (Honeyslug had previously created the charming Kahoots Mini for PS3) and attended a special Sony developer's presentation in London. They eventually settled on a game, Frobisher Says, that used all the available inputs, from smile detection to the back touch pads and cameras.


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Sony's track record for supporting indie development is mixed, boasting some notable successes on the PlayStation Network Store, and some that stumbled from the start, like the downloadable Minis for PSP and PlayStation 3. Which approach will it take with the new PlayStation Vita, a machine that some would argue already faces a battle for survival in an iOS dominated market?

The answer will be found amongst the booming independent development scene, which has snaked its way into every viable platform on the market looking for outlets that will accept a new breed of experimental, left-field, single-minded and funky game play.

Ricky Haggett and Dick Hogg from Honeyslug admit to being "bewildered" by the machine at first, even after they were specifically approached by their account manager at Sony (Honeyslug had previously created the charming Kahoots Mini for PS3) and attended a special Sony developer's presentation in London. They eventually settled on a game, Frobisher Says, that used all the available inputs, from smile detection to the back touch pads and cameras.


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It's a confusing time in the world of mobile and portable gaming. Consumers seem to be moving away from the idea that they need an entirely separate device to play games on the go, settling for cheap, generally simple touchscreen games on their cell phones and tablets. Nintendo, following up the insanely successful DS system that rested on a seemingly gimmicky double screen design, added a newer glasses-free 3D gimmick to its Nintendo 3DS—only to see extremely slow sales force it into a premature price drop. Sony's PlayStation Portable, meanwhile, has carved out a niche for itself as a serious gamer's system, especially in Japan, but is beginning to show its age as a system designed in the pre-smartphone era.

For the new PlayStation Vita, Sony responded to this confusion by throwing everything and the kitchen sink into the system. For hardcore gamers, there are two analog sticks—a first for a portable system—and a gigantic screen loaded with pixels. For casual players, there's the now-ubiquitous touchscreen as well as a unique rear touch panel to enable new tactile, touchy-feely gameplay. The Vita has two cameras, a GPS receiver, and a 3G data option. There's music and video players, a Web browser, Google Maps, and even a proximity-based social network. Oh, and it also plays games, I guess (more on those in a separate post).

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Nope. Still not got a clue.
Is it a puzzle game? Is it a platformer? Why PixelJunk Eden is a bit of both, even if it hides it under the sort of abstract silliness that makes it impossible to describe in a precis. I’ve rewritten this intro three times already, and still haven’t managed to fully understand what the hell you do.
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