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Spanish illustrator Jaume Montserrat has recently shared via email his new series titled, “Emptyland.” His pen drawings all have a “ribbon effect” that relate to a “void” of each animal. To understand this better, we have to travel back in time. While on a flight back home from South America to Spain—Montserrat falls asleep and imagines waking up on an island where he lives for 29 days with other animals. He explains: “On this island, there was only one animal from each specimen [kind of like Noah’s Ark]. All of them were empty, asexual and immortal. They didn’t need to hunt, nor were they scared of being hunted—so there was a perfect symbiosis.” He and the wildlife lived free from worries, and that empty paradise is what sparked these images.

Iguana and giraffe Ribbon flamingo by Jaume Montserrat

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Every year, farmers in Indonesia clear large swaths of forest by setting deliberate slash-and-burn fires, sending clouds of smoke into the atmosphere, choking neighbors, including Malaysia and Singapore. This season has been the harshest in years -- in Singapore yesterday, the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) rose to the highest level on record, reaching 371, prompting government officials to warn residents to stay indoors, and urging the Indonesian government to take action. Indonesia accused Singapore of acting "like a child", and warned it to stay out of domestic affairs. Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the haze could persist for weeks or longer, as the two nations prepare for emergency talks to ease the crisis. [18 photos]

A woman wears a mask as the Singapore Central Business District is covered with haze Thursday evening, June 20, 2013. Singapore urged people to remain indoors amid unprecedented levels of air pollution Thursday as a smoky haze wrought by forest fires in neighboring Indonesia worsened dramatically. (AP Photo/Joseph Nair)     

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Reuters photographer Yannis Behrakis, based in Athens, spent several weeks documenting the unemployed and homeless in Greece as the continued economic downturn has impacted the numbers of homeless. Since the debt crisis erupted in 2009, hundreds of thousands of Greeks have lost their jobs -- the unemployment rate in the country reached 26.8 percent, as the economy contracted by another 5.6 percent in the first quarter of 2013, and even stricter austerity measures are being urged. See also Portraits of Greece in Crisis from last year. [23 photos]

Alexandros, a 42-year-old from Serres in northern Greece, sits in the abandoned car he lives in, at the port of Piareus near Athens, on April 10, 2013. Alexandros owned a plant shop in Athens until 2010, when it was forced to close, he became homeless soon after. According to Praxis, a non-governmental organization, the number of homeless in Greece has nearly doubled to over 20,000 from 11,000 in 2009. (Reuters/Yannis Behrakis)     

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Staff

NOWNESS have debuted Gold Panda's video for his new single "My Father in Hong Kong 1961". Directed by longtime collaborator Ronni Shendar, the dreamy visuals were shot in Hong Kong and capture myriad aspects of Hong Kong life, "from the mystery of its shoreline to its bustling streets." Taken from forthcoming album Half of Where You Live, the song references Derwin "Gold" Panda's father, who lived in the region when it was under British control. "He was doing military service in HK in the 60s which must have been such a crazy time," he says. "I think he had to give police support on days when there were pro-communist marches." Check out the video above.


www.iamgoldpanda.com

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Guy Martin

Two years ago, after being wounded in Libya, I made a promise to myself, my family, friends and loved ones to never cover war, civil unrest, protests or even a particularly robust political debate ever again. After witnessing the unfolding of the Arab revolutions in Egypt and Libya, my desire to witness and photograph violent events had never been lower. In short, I had turned my back on anybody and anything that I thought would cause me harm.

However, I do live in Istanbul — a huge, bustling Turkish metropolis that is currently at the center of mix of foreign policy dilemmas, political strife and internal debates.

And this weekend, I’ve witnessed a burgeoning protest movement against the construction of another mall and shopping precinct on one of the few slivers of green space in a city that is increasingly urbanized. Corruption seems to be endemic, and any spare green area is quickly developed without any public consultation.

I wanted to join the protestors to see for myself what was happening 25 minutes from where I live. As I stepped on the metro, I was hit with a knot in my stomach — that swirling, vomit-inducing feeling that only happens when you are utterly petrified. Istanbul’s locals aren’t known for being particularly outgoing, chatty or forthcoming on public transit, and Saturday was no different. It seemed just like any other normal day.

But then the train came to a stop, and every carriage erupted with loud clapping and banging on any object that came into view. It continued as the people made their way up the escalators into the burning mid-day heat.

For the next two days I followed them from the peripheries. Tear gas was fired, barricades were constructed, fires burned and stones thrown. Angry anarchists confronted police in Gezi Park — where I saw mothers bring their young children to witness a momentous event happening in their city.

These pictures were made with no assignment in hand and no particular desire to even make a coherent body of work. My purpose was to just witness and to observe with a sharper eye from experience.

Guy Martin is an English documentary photographer living in Istanbul. Represented by Panos Pictures, Martin previously covered the Caucuses, Georgia and Russia as well as the uprisings in Egypt and Libya.

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Ken Lyons

A tornado touches down near El Reno, Okla., Friday, May 31, 2013, causing damage to structures and injuring travelers on Interstate 40. Another series of deadly tornados swept across Oklahoma injuring hundreds and causing multiple fatalities including a team of storm chasers. Smoke rises from the International Red Cross building after a gun battle between [...]

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Artist and photographer Richard Mosse reveals the stories behind the making of his latest film, 'The Enclave' (2013), in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which will be shown in the Irish Pavilion at this year’s 55th Venice Biennale.

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