Skip navigation
Help

Popular culture

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Plenty of movies use some version of the “nerd experience” to create comedy and sympathetic characters. The lovable loser who learns to fit in with society — or who teaches society how to get along with him — is a standard archetype at this point.

But no other film nails the emotions of being a hardcore nerd like Zero Charisma. The film is the story of Scott, a domineering but lonely guy who controls his own little geek clique as the dungeon master of a long-running role-playing game. His minor social standing is threatened by the intrusion of the funny, good-looking Miles, a guy who seems to be everything Scott cannot become.

Zero Charisma is right on the money when it comes to capturing the personal interactions, obsessions, and insecurities of nerd culture. It can be uncomfortably familiar, but it is hilariously funny as it simultaneously skewers and embraces members of true nerddom. Check out a trailer below.

Zero Charisma is available digitally October 8, and in theaters October 11. Apple has the trailer.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Staff

The members of Odd Future are continuing to take over the hip-hop world with a new seven track EP from Hodgy Beats entitled Untitled 2. A sneak peak of the album was released last week in the form of introspective lo-fi track "Years", on which the rapper (aka. Gerard Damien Long) talks about the visions he had for his life, the direction it's currently going in, and the goals he hopes to achieve. You can stream Hodgy Beats' Untitled 2 below and let us know your thoughts in the comments.

0
Your rating: None


The Viral Video Manifesto: Eepybird at TEDxDirigo

From their first online video featuring the explosive combination of Coke and Mentos that Advertising Age called the most important commercial content of the year, to their viral campaigns for OfficeMax, ABC Family, and more, EepyBird's videos have been seen over 150 million times. EepyBird has received four Webby Awards, two Emmy nominations, and was voted "Game Changer of the Decade" on GoViral.com. EepyBird's founders, Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz, have appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman (twice), Ellen, The Today Show, Mythbusters, and more. They have performed in Las Vegas, New York, Paris, London, and Istanbul. They come by their rigorously analytic approach to Internet video honestly. Stephen has a law degree from NYU and practiced as a trial lawyer in Boston for twenty years. Fritz studied mathematics at Yale University until he dropped out of school to become an award-winning circus performer. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
2

10
ratings
Time:
19:17
More in
Nonprofits & Activism

0
Your rating: None

In July 2012, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (MOCA) asked me to compile a playlist of videos directed by photographers for their new online series, MOCAtv. Launched last week, MOCAtv bills itself as the “Global Contemporary Art Channel,” providing a wide range of content related to the arts. Looking to see if photographers’ skills translated into music videos was one of the most enjoyable commissions I have ever had.

My personal interest in music videos is mainly autobiographical. I was a teenager in the 1980s—the heyday of the music video. Videos were crucial to bands’ identity; it was really the only way, apart from photography, that an image was disseminated to the world. MTV was the dominant force, but if you grew up in Britain, it was the quaintly titled BBC show Top of the Pops that was one of the only ways to see them.

Looking back at these videos has evoked amazing memories, but at times, I view some videos with a new perspective and appreciate them now because of who made them and how they look. For example, the mesmerizing Addicted to Love by Robert Palmer was always incredible – but now that I know it was directed by the great British fashion and portrait photographer Terence Donovan, all I can see are the similarities to his later photographs of the 1980s with their strong, almost aggressive, female glamour.  It’s interesting to note where the photographer’s hand is so apparent and successful, and elsewhere, when they lose something of their signature flair by having a moving camera instead of a still shot.

Like many, my introduction to music came via my older brother. Always one step ahead of me, he had very sophisticated taste. My first concert was Souxsie and the Banshees when I was 14. Somehow I managed to persuade him (and more miraculously my parents) that I should go along with him and a gang of heavily hair-sprayed goths. It was not the music that I particularly remember, but the amazing beauty of this particular strand of post punk music. From that moment I was addicted to live concerts and the performance of dressing up.

I knew about New Order due to my brothers liking of Joy Division. I saw them perform that summer and their shortened remix of Blue Monday (1988) is like a backing track to those heady months, which were incredibly hot and renamed by many of my contemporaries as ‘the summer of ale.’ I was 18.

When I was asked to put this playlist together I couldn’t believe that I had never seen the video. I was so delighted that it was done by William Wegman. It is full of lovely references for me. Wegman is an artist who manages to have conceptual credibility and respect in the art world and also make calendars with puppies. I can’t think of any one else who manages such success in both commercial and art worlds with such ease and lack of compromise on either side. His ABC video Alphabet Soup featuring Fay, Batty, Chundo and Crooky is my favorite gift to all new parents; my daughter’s go-to bedtime book is Wegmonolgy and my brother has Weineramas. It’s like all good things in my life are condensed into this one video.

A year after Blue Monday, New Order released Run and asked Robert Frank to direct it. This video combines many different kinds of video techniques into one film. It has both live footage and a narrative. It also uses still photographs many times. Nothing is really explained but it has that coldness, disconnect and mystery which is so crucial to a Frank photograph. The song is not the strongest, but you are held utterly by the video. The ending is pure Frank: it stops on a still photograph where everyone is looking in different directions and the scene is chaotic but happy. In two takes he goes closer in to the black-and-white photograph with a woman clutching a book titled listen to god. About two seconds of existential anxiety almost lost as the song fades out.

Staying in the 1980s is Chris Isaak’s Wicked Game, directed by Herb Ritts. This song, which came out in 1989, was reinserted into popular culture when it was used in a scene of Wild at Heart by David Lynch. The video is trademark Ritts. The female body (Helena Christensen) is Amazonian—sexy, strong and very much associated with the 1980s before the AIDS crisis (although of course the AIDS crisis had very much gripped huge swaths of society by this time). It’s crisp, clean and erotic. He shoots from many angles so the body, although always sensuous, can also become abstracted. This photographic technique, which Ritts has become so famous for, was most eloquently played out in a photograph of five of the most famous supermodels gathered together naked (Stephanie, Cindy, Christy, Tatjana, Naomi, Hollywood, 1989) their limbs lending graphic strength and dynamism to the composition of the picture.

Die Antwoord, I Fink U Freeky directed by Roger Ballen (2012) practically went viral among photography circles recently. The video starts with “Die Antwoord in Association with Roger Ballen.” This is the first time I have seen musicians and the director on equal footing, especially when the band has a much bigger global presence than the photographer.

Ballen has lived and worked in South Africa for most of his life. His work is a swirling mix of reality, fantasy, documentary and personal investigation. He photographs in the poorest white areas of South Africa, and his work is immediately recognizable for its disturbing almost nihilistic qualities, which are confusing in terms of ethics and morals of representation. This video is like a zooped up, hammy musical journey through his work and is so well suited to the band, who have a trickster element to them. They are the perfect artistic combination.

Another South African photographer, Pieter Hugo, has directed Spoek Mathambo, Control which was originally recorded by Joy Division and has again been introduced to a younger generation through the biopic of Ian Curtis in the film Control by Anton Corbijn (who has also done a large number of music videos). Again this has similar elements to the Ballen video in that reality has been pushed to appear fantastical. Of all the videos selected it is the most ‘photographic,’ and you can really see Hugo’s skill in using backdrops to create scenes. If you were to go through freeze framing it each scene could work beautifully as a photograph. It reminds me of his Nollywood series about the horror film industry in Nigeria. For this he took costumed actors and put them into the street causing a tension between reality, fantasy, horror, staging and theater. This video has all of those elements and similar references to the genre, but was filmed in a township in Cape Town. It’s the best cover of Control I have ever heard, making it absolutely belong here in South Africa and not the North of England.

Music videos act as lightening rods to memories. Headier than photographs they possess the most potent Proustain links to the past. When they are at their very best, like the ones I have mentioned here, they are like stills come to life. Photographers can offer a particular way of looking at the world. When that coincides with a similar musical vision the results can be spectacular.

Susan Bright is a New York-based writer and curator. You can see more of her work here

View more of MOCAtv’s programming on their YouTube channel.

0
Your rating: None

#10 Bavaria Beer Bikini Babe - Isn't it amazing how looking at hot girls wearing thongs always makes you incredibly thirsty.

#9 Apuana Beer Bra Bottler Opener - I think it would've been even more impressive had she opened it below the equator, but that's just me.

#8 Tui Beer Female Brewery - It's every man's dream come true... I think?

#7 Guinness Share With Your Friends - This commercial is so unrealistic. There's no way a beer would stay on a woman's back while she's getting tag teamed.

#6 Stampede Beer Goes Down - The genius part about this commercial is that the cleavage complete distracts you so you don't see the obvious sexual joke coming... that's what she said.

#5 Brahma Booty Beer - Sure beer and butts have a long history together, but it's usually for all the wrong reasons.

#4 Isenbeck Ballet Class - So apparently most ballet classes involves a lot of butt sniffing.

#3 Kamenitza Walking Booties - You can't truly appreciate a female booty until you see it walking in slow motion.

#2 Hahn Super Dry - They had me at bouncing bikini boobies.

#1 Miller Lite Catfight - You know a commercial is awesome when it has an uncensored version.

1
Your rating: None Average: 1 (1 vote)

About

Computer Reaction Faces are reaction face images used to express the emotions of someone sitting in front of a computer screen, which often take the form of comic illustrations and animated GIFs.

Origin

The first computer reaction face instance is currently unknown. The Long Neck Reaction Guy image (shown below) is rumored to have originated in the /v/ (video games) board on 4chan in 2009, where it would be used in reaction to threads involving disturbing video games like Katawa Shoujo, a dating game in which the player romances a women with crippling disfigurations.

Spread

On March 28th, 2010, a thread was created in the /a/ (Anime & Manga) board on 4chan,[1] in which a template image featuring a computer monitor sitting at an empty desk was provided for other users to create their own computer reaction images (shown below). Prior to being archived, the thread received over 200 responses.

Computer Guy

On April 5th, 2011, Redditor _hellojello submitted a post to the /r/funny[2] subreddit titled “The awkward moment when you spell a common word correctly, but it just looks so wrong so you stare at it forever,” which featured an illustration of a man sitting at a computer with his hands on his face (shown below, left). Prior to being archived, the post received over 995 up votes and 100 comments. On October 17th, Redditor Bmxing85 submitted a post titled “I knew it… This is how I always saw computer computer guy,”[3] featuring a comic illustrating the computer guy’s arms as a large Fu Manchu mustache (shown below, right).

NSFW Guy

On June 26th, 2011, Redditor thexnotoriousxlmg submitted a post to the /r/funny[4] subreddit titled “NSFW You Say,” which featured a four-pane vertical comic of a man sitting at a computer with an erection wearing a smiley face (shown below). Redditor Tasteless_Gif replied to the post with an animated GIF version of the comic, which became the top-voted comment with 61 points. Prior to being archived, the post received over 1,840 up votes and 30 comments.

Notable Examples

Search Interest

External Links

[1] 4chanarchive – Archived Thread

[2] Reddit – the awkward moment when you spell a word correctly

[3] Reddit – I knew it… this is how I always saw computer guy

[4] Reddit – NSFW You Say

0
Your rating: None