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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher


MWE Lab's Emperor 1510 LX—don't call it a chair.

MWE Labs

Science fiction is filled with cherished seats of power, workstations that put the universe a finger-touch or a mere thought away. Darth Vader had his meditation pod, the Engineers of Prometheus had their womb-like control stations, and Captain Kirk has the Captain's Chair. But no real-life workstation has quite measured up to these fictional seats of power in the way that Martin Carpentier's Emperor workstations have.

The latest "modern working environment" from Carpentier's Quebec City-based MWE Lab is the Emperor 1510 LX. With a retractable monitor stand that can support up to five monitors (three 27-inch and two 19-inch), a reclining seat with thigh rest, a Bose sound system, and Italian leather upholstery, the Emperor 1510 LX looks more like a futuristic vehicle than a workstation.  And it's priced like a vehicle, too—it can soon be yours for the low, low price of $21,500.

Tale of the Scorpion

In 2006, Carpentier was slaving away as a web designer when he reached a breaking point. He was tired of his tangle of cables, the struggle to manage multiple monitors, and the horrible ergonomics that came with a standard computer desk. Inspired by the emperor scorpion, Carpentier modeled his workstation after its tail, with the monitors suspended at the stinger.

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It’s tough being an action hero; you’ve always got a target on your back. That is basically the premise of Everybody Wants to Kill Bruce, which assembles footage from over two dozen movies to create a ten-minute all-star reel in which Bruce Willis flees from danger at every turn. This cut doesn’t limit itself to footage from Bruce Willis movies, however. There are bits of Death Proof and Heat in there, among many others. (More than one Back the the Future movie? The Dark Knight? Sure, why not?)

You’ll see clips from the Die Hard movies and 12 Monkeys, as well as many more Willis films, but they’re all glued together with other action. Props go to the creative use of Kurt Russell’s Death Proof character in tandem with ‘Testarossa Autodrive (SebastiAn Remix)’ from Kavinsky’s 1986 EP.

There’s not much of a unifying principle here beyond the basic idea. No real plot, and no real commentary implied about how these films all play similarly enough to cut together to some extent. It’s really just a fun exercise for action fans. Sad thing is, this scattershot edit is more coherent than some action movies I’ve seen in the past couple years.

Here’s the ten-minute edit, which is NSFW for a bit of sex, and William Sadler’s ass. (Not seen in the same scene.)

The Pierre-Alexandre Chauvat page that presents the supercut on Vimeo offers:

When he wakes up one morning, Bruce Willis finds himself pursued by an entire city: or how to give him a hard time in 39 movies ! Don’t be mistaken, it’s just an action movie … old fashioned style !

Editor : Pierre-Alexandre CHAUVAT
Sound Mixer : Sylvain Denis

 

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Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life. Regular readers of The Big Picture will recognize his distinctive work from his previous entry here on the Mustang region of Nepal. Weidman writes of the threatened nomadic culture in Mongolia: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land. Due to severe winters and poor pasture, many thousands of herders have traded in their centuries-old way of life for employment in mining towns and urban areas. The ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar house a permanent population of displaced nomads. There, they live without running water or a tangible use for the skills and crafts that were practiced on the steppes. The younger generation is no longer learning these essential aspects of their nomadic heritage." -- Lane Turner (29 photos total)
A young nomad herds his animals by motorcycle after an early spring snowstorm. Mongolian herders adopt technology quickly and it is not uncommon to see trucks and motorcycles replacing work animals. (Taylor Weidman/The Vanishing Cultures Project)

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SpaceX Merlin 1D booster

Entrepreneur Elon Musk has made it his business to take on spaceflight, an alluring but sometimes painfully stagnant area of technology. After helping to found PayPal, he moved on to Tesla Motors and SpaceX, which recently made the first commercial supply mission to the ISS. Now, Wired's Chris Anderson — who is himself leaving Wired to focus on startup 3D Robotics — has interviewed Musk about his original plans for SpaceX, the process of building and launching his rockets, and the possibility of a truly reusable spacecraft, which Musk calls "the fundamental thing that’s necessary for humanity to become a space-faring civilization."

Musk isn't the only man with a plan for space travel, but his company has seen a level of success...

Continue reading…

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Entry
There’s a reason why Elon Musk is being called the next Steve Jobs. Like Jobs he’s a visionary, a super successful serial entrepreneur having made his initial fortune with a company he sold to Compaq before starting Paypal. Like Jobs, he saved his beloved baby Tesla Motors from the brink of oblivion. Like Jobs, he’s a genius generalist with “huge steel balls” (according to his ex-wife) and a knack for paradigm-shifting industry disruption. Which means he’s also hard to work with. “Like Jobs, Elon does not tolerate C or D players,” SpaceX board member and early Tesla investor Steve Jurvetson told BusinessWeek.

But while Jobs was slinging multi-colored music players and touchable smartphones, Musk is building rocket ships and electric-powered supercars. It’s why his friends describe him as not just Steve Jobs but also John D. Rockefeller and Howard Hughes all wrapped in one. His friend Jon Favreau used Musk as the real-life inspiration for the big screen version of Tony Stark. Elon Musk is a badass.

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On May 28, 1993, a remote and dusty thicket of the Australian outback shook for hundreds of miles around. Deep reverberating explosions could be heard far and wide, the night sky illuminated by sporadic flashes of unexplained light—all this allegedly witnessed by heavy goods drivers, gold prospectors and nomads traipsing the bush. Three truckers even spoke to an Australian geologist about the lights, claiming that they’d seen a “moon-sized fireball” which flew “from south to north with the speed of a jet plane.” They said “it was yellow-orange in colour and had a small blue-white tail, which lit up the sky as it headed immediately west for Banjawarn station.”

The strange event registered just shy of 4.0 on the Richter scale. Its blast could be heard over a radius of 90 square miles. The Australian government later dismissed the mysterious temblor as “probably being natural in origin”. IRIS, the U.S. federal seismology agency, said that the Earth-shaking detonation was “170 times larger than the largest mining explosion ever recorded in that Australian region” and was proven to have the force of a nuclear bomb.

Some scientists speculated that it could’ve been a meteorite. But authorities found no signs of a crater as they searched for one via helicopter. Despite the fact that the epicentre of the ominous blast pointed in all directions to a remote research facility manned by Aum Shinrikyo, the notorious Japanese death-cult noted for its attempts at mining uranium and its grim obsession with alternative weapons technology, the whole event was eventually shrugged off and forgotten about.

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