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Psychological resilience

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Ruins of an Alternate Future (Jinhua Architecture Park)

“One of the great, if seldom realized, promises of architecture is its capacity to affect change. The best architects seem to have this potential in mind constantly as they structure career-length narratives around the social impact that good design can achieve. While this is often hyperbole, and most projects are driven by functional or economic considerations, there is the occasional opportunity for artists and architects to create purely speculative work, where radical departures from established typologies suggest alternatives to the status quo.” - Photography and text by Evan Chakroff (via Tenuous Resilience | Ruins of an Alternate Future: Jinhua Architecture Park)

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Gloriann Liu went to Afghanistan to photograph people with disabilities, but her series, "Forgotten Afghanistan," is more relationships -- both familial bonds and the bonds she forged with her subjects.

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Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience, a portfolio of more than 30 photographs by Marco Grob, are on display at New York’s Milk Gallery. The black-and-white images first appeared in the September 19 edition of TIME, a special commemorative issue for the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. The photos, some measuring 60 in.-by-120 in., appear alongside videos of Valerie Plame, Donald Rumsfeld, James Yee and other participants from TIME’s issue, as part of the multimedia exhibit.

The Swiss photographer, who is based in New York, spent nine weeks traveling across the country for the portfolio, including stops in Dallas, Texas– where he photographed George W. Bush alongside Bob Beckwith, the firefighter who stood beside the President on his first visit to Ground Zero following the attacks—and New York City, where he captured the only four people to have survived from above the impact zone in the South Tower. The project broke new ground for Grob, as each subject was not only photographed, but interviewed and filmed in the same session. “For 25 years I’ve gotten the shot quickly and walked away. It stopped right there,” he said. “This time we did the shot, and people stayed and cried.” After each interview, Grob and his assistants often ended up in tears as well. “We had a hard time containing ourselves. To cry during the interview would have been unprofessional,” says Grob. “But in the editing, it was hard to handle our emotions.”

Seeing the portraits printed in a large format, where the details intensify some of the subjects’ fragile state of mind, was overwhelming for the photographer. Though Grob has since turned to other work—next week, he heads to Cambodia to begin a new project that will be a companion piece to his earlier photographs of Afghanistani land mine removal workers with the United Nations Mine Action Service—the photographer can’t quite leave the 9/11 portraits behind. “There’s so much still in my head,” says Grob. “I’m still digesting the stories.”

Kira Pollack

From left: Photographer Marco Grob and TIME's Deputy photo editor, Paul Moakley during the installation at Milk Gallery. Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience is on display from Sept. 22-Oct. 7 at the Milk Gallery, located at 450 West 15th St. in New York. The show’s opening reception will be Thursday September 22nd from 7-10 pm.

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TIME contract photographer Marco Grob shares an intimate look into the making of the portraits and oral history series that comprise Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience.  The project reveals the astonishing testimonies from over 40 men and women including George W. Bush, Tom Brokaw, General David Petraeus, Valerie Plame Wilson, Black Hawk helicopter pilot Tammy Duckworth, as well as the heroic first responders to Ground Zero. After looking into one of America’s greatest tragedies, Grob now shares his side of the story, and what it was like to be on the other side of the lens.

To visit TIME’s Beyond 9/11: A Portrait of Resilience, a project that chronicles 9/11 and its aftermath, click here. TIME: VOICES OF 9/11, a full length film of Grob’s work will be screened at Film Forum, located at 209 West Houston Street, New York, NY 10014. For more information go to their website by clicking here.

See more of Marco Grob’s work by clicking here.

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On September 11, 2001, photography editors across the world, overcome with a deluge of devastating imagery, faced the daunting task of selecting photos that would go on to define a catastrophe like no other. A decade later, TIME asked a wide variety of the industry’s leading photo editors, photographers, authors, educators, and bloggers to tell us which image moved them most—and why.

Some couldn’t choose one single image. Vin Alabiso, head of photography at the Associated Press on September 11, 2001, said, “Of the thousands of images that were captured, I thought only a handful would truly resonate with me. I was wrong. As a document of a day filled with horror and heroism, the collective work of so many professionals and amateurs leaves its own indelible mark on our memory.”

Holly Hughes, editor of Photo District News, said she was moved most by the photographs of the missing people that blanketed the city in the days after 9/11. “The images that can still move me to tears are the snapshots of happy, smiling people looking out from the homemade missing posters that were taped to signposts and doorways and mailboxes,” she said. “How those posters were made, the state of mind of the people who stood at Xerox machines to make copies, it’s too painful to contemplate. Those flyers stayed up around the city for weeks, through wind and rain, and became entwined with the sorrow and anxiety we carried with us day after day.”

Alabiso added, “A decade later, I could only wish that the most memorable photo of September 11, 2001, would not have been memorable at all…simply two towers silhouetted against a clear azure-blue sky.”

To visit TIME’s Beyond 9/11: A Portrait of Resilience, a project that chronicles 9/11 and its aftermath, click here.

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