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Quantum field theory

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In this article from the April 2012 issue of Game Developer magazine, Radical Entertainment senior rendering coder Keith O'Conor describes the nuts and bolts of the game's particle system -- detailing exactly how it produces great looking effects that perform well in the open-world adventure game. One hallmark of the Prototype universe is over-the-top open-world mayhem. We rely heavily on large amounts of particle effects to create chaos, filling the environment with fire, blood, explosions, ...

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recluse:

“I don’t run away from a challenge because I am afraid. Instead, I run toward it. Because the only way to escape fear is to trample it beneath your feet.” 

— Nadia Comaneci

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Higgspeople_thumb

Of course you know what the Higgs boson is — it’s the theorized particle that composes the energy field that endows every other particle with mass. It’s the particle that makes the universe possible, let’s nature construct things, like humans, or the massive particles that make up humans. You don’t have to be a particle physicist to know that much, and to appreciate something about how significant finding it is to our still-sketchy model of the universe. (Okay, to be fair, even if you were a particle physicist working at the LHC, you probably couldn’t really explain what the hell a Higgs boson really, really is; just listen to some of them try).

And yet, today’s announcement of evidence of a “Higgslike” particle at the CERN research center outside Geneva prompts us to ask what, if anything, does the rest of the world (or, really, the rest of Williamsburg) know about this Higgs boson? Wonderful Motherboard interns Andre and Michelle took to the streets with cameras yesterday to ask some of the good people there. The results are a bit of a bummer, but maybe things will be different by Monday, when the news has reached full Higgs saturation, and everyone around the world will know what it is, and mainstream poets and rappers will be writing odes to the thing. Then again, maybe the world has better things to do than trying to understand itself.

Also see The Higgs Boson as Explained by YouTube.

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cms (cern)

Scientists at CERN say they've found a new particle consistent with the Standard Model Higgs boson with 5-sigma certainty — a false positive probability of about 1 in 9 trillion. Evidence of the particle's existence in the 126GeV mass range was gleaned from the CMS (video below) and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva. CMS spokesperson Joe Incandela explains, "this is indeed a new particle. We know it must be a boson and it’s the heaviest boson ever found."

Definitely a new particle, but is it the Higgs?

Before the particle can be determined to be the Standard Model Higgs, scientists will need to find out more about its properties in order to rule out the possibility that it's something "more exotic." While the...

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MrSeb writes "Today's groundbreaking entry into the Uncanny Valley is a pair of mechanical, robot legs that are propelled entirely by their own weight: they can walk with a human-like gait without motors or external control. Produced by some researchers at Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan, all the legs require for sustained motion (they walked 100,000 steps, 15km, over 13 hours last year) is a gentle push and a slight downwards slope. They then use same 'principle of falling' that governs human walking, with the transfer of weight (and the slight pull of gravity), pulling the robot into consecutive steps."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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In my blog I'm talking about my life and experiences as a student, trying to become a games programmer and getting a job in the industry.

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In which Joey comes to a startling realization, storms a bit, and settles down to nurture his latent creative side.

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This project is my attempt to create a stippling algorithm for reproducing images as dot patterns. The image is loaded and the pixel information is stored in an array. Then I begin to populate the space with magnetic particles. Each particle pushes away other particles so they begin to spread out.

The particle checks the pixel array to see what shade of grey it needs to represent. If it needs to show blackness, it grows smaller and its magnetic charge diminished accordingly. If it needs to represent white, it grows larger as does its charge. Once you throw a few tens of thousands of particles into the scene, eventually they spread out in an organically pleasing manner. There seems to be no patterning, but its certainly not a random spread.

I added an additional feature which allowed the particle to scale down small enough that it becomes invisible to the naked eye. I then allowed adjacent particles to stretch a thin black line between them if their distance is short enough. I changed the background color to grey so that the particles and lines could paint in the light and dark parts of the image.

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